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Help with identification (to start with!)

PeteW1959

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Jan 22, 2021
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My first post on here. I have recently got into refurbishing old cuckoo clocks, and have also discovered that my 2x great grandfather, Matheaeus Saettele, was a clock maker in Eisenbach in the Black Forest, early-mid 19th century.

I have been given what looks like a very old miniature cuckoo clock. It was partially dismantled, and in a terrible state.

I have dismantled and cleaned the mechanism, but now realise that there are some parts missing.

I would like to try and identify the maker/model so that I can try and source some spares. I have attached some photos (after cleaning the mechanism!)

Thanks in advance.

Thanks in advance. 20210122_135647edit.jpg 20210122_135819edit.jpg 20210122_135832edit.jpg
 

Ticktocktime100

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Nov 11, 2012
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Hi,

You have a little German novelty clock, modeled as a cuckoo clock - but with no cuckoo. It was made in the 1950’s, perhaps slightly earlier, so it isn’t immensely old. The movement is unsigned which makes it very difficult to identify specifically, as these clocks were mass-produced by a variety of Black Forest makers to be brought home by tourists. Ebay or Timesavers are good platforms for the parts you require, just look up novelty clock parts or cuckoo clock parts and you should find results.

However, the clock is of little value (what is more, the dial isn’t original or has been repainted) and the cost of parts will largely outweigh what it is worth. I would suggest you purchase these only if you are prepared to invest in a learning curve or the clock has sentimental value - these are good fun. Otherwise, save your money for another project.

Good luck!

Regards.
 

PeteW1959

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Jan 22, 2021
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It does have a cuckoo that moves up and down with an opening beak and at least part of what is required to produce sound. There is a wooden 'whistle' on each side of the case, each one producing a slightly different note, but there are no bellows, and nothing to make the cuckoo move. This is where I could really do with some pictures so I can try to work out what is missing.

The dial has been repainted; if you get the light right you can see the outline of Roman numerals under the paint.

I am using it as a 'learning' project and within reason don't mind what I spend. I have an engineering background, but never done anything with clocks before.

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Ticktocktime100

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Nov 11, 2012
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Hi,

The following video features an identical movement to yours complete and in working order. You should be able to see how it operates, despite the quality of the video which could be better. You might want to look into making the bellows out of Tyvek paper.


Regards.
 

Vernon

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Dec 9, 2006
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Do a search "German cuckoo clock single weight" or "Single weight cuckoo clock". These have some clearer pictures.
 

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