Help With Hamilton Identification

X6StringerX

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Jun 6, 2009
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I believe this watch most closely matches the looks of a 945, but I'm not sure that is the best way to identfy it, so I would like the opinion of those that know more about antique Hamiltons than I do. I don't know how to remove the back cover, so if someone could instruct me, that would be great as well. Anyway, this watch was awarded to my great-grandfather for 25 years of service to his place of work back in 1972. On the back of the watch, an incription reads:

Presented
To
Everett James Dawson
In Recognition of
25 Years Loyal Service
Union Carbide Corporation
[Union Carbide]
1972


On the rim of the watch, it reads:

*14k Gold 85670


The watch is fully functional, but the crystal was broken a couple of years ago. However, the watch spends all of its time in storage in its box, so hopefully this hasn't hurt it any. Any information about the watch would be greatly appreciated.


FrontDialComplete.gif

WatchInBox.gif

BackWords.gif

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WatchBox1.gif

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Robert Sweet

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Apr 29, 2004
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Hello X6StringerX,

Welcome to the NAWCC American Pocket Watch message board.

Click here and roll down to (Hinge Back and Bezel cases or snap back cases)
for instructions to gain access to your watch movement (the works).


(Instructions Courtesy of Kent Singer)

The grade and serial number will be engraved on the movement.

Robert



 
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X6StringerX

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Thanks so much for the help. Removing the back cover was really easy. The watch is, indeed, a 945. Unfortunately, I haven't mastered the art of taking macro shots with my point and shoot camera, so you can barely see anything in the pics.

The back cover reads:

Hamilton W. CO.
Lancaster .PA.
*14K GOLD
P754680
STAR W.C CO.

The movement has the following markings:

Hamilton USA
23 JEWELS
945

ADJUSTED 5 Positions


F|S
|
"""""

Here are the pictures:

DSC00441.gif

DSC00443.gif

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Robert Sweet

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Apr 29, 2004
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X6StringerX,

Click here for a thread on the Hamilton 945. Be sure to read all the posts.

Robert
 

X6StringerX

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That was an interesting read. So from what I gather, not too much is known about the 945. I noted that production was shut down in 1969, yet my watch was engraved in 1972. Should this be taken as a clue that it was possibly new old stock?

I was searching Ebay to get an idea of how many of these are floating around and only came up with 3 hits. Of the 3 hits, one was listed as a circa 1950s, another as a 1960s, and the last with no date. Is there even a way to determine an exact production year?


EDIT:

I decided to read up on taking better macro pics. Here's the best I could come up with.

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WatchBack.gif

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RON in PA

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May 18, 2005
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I have a 945 that was presented for service in 1970, again another that was presented after production ended.

Not too much is known about the 945 because Hamilton did not serialize them, probably to save money. According to Lasser's list they were made from 1956 till 1969, replacing the earlier 3/4 plate size 10 watch, the 917, and the size 10 bridge movement models 921 and 923.

This is speculation, but by 1956 I assume most pocket watches were purchased by companies for award purposes and not by individuals. It is likely that the awarding companies had purchased these watches in lots and maintained them in inventory until needed. It's also possible that Hamilton retained some 945s in stock until the early 1970s. Again all speculation.
 

Don Dahlberg

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Aug 31, 2000
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Here is your watch from the 1968 Hamilton catalog.

Award watches were a major source of income for Hamilton through the 70s.

Hughes68.jpg

Don
 

X6StringerX

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I apologize for asking so many questions, but what kind of crystal should I look for as a replacement? Is it as simple as just finding a Size 10 crystal, or is there more involved?
 

Ethan Lipsig

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I have an identical Hamilton 945, also a Union Carbide 25-year award watch. I bought it in March 2007 for $300. It is in seemingly unused condition, and has a crystal.
 

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Kent

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I apologize for asking so many questions, but what kind of crystal should I look for as a replacement? Is it as simple as just finding a Size 10 crystal, or is there more involved?
Crystal sizes are independent of movement sizes, except that cases of a given movement size will require crystals within a certain range of diameters. Always keep in mind that all cases made for the same size movement do not use the same crystal size. Also, the ranges of crystal diameters that might be needed for successive movement sizes will overlap.

A caliper, reading in thousandths (1/1000's) of an inch, or tenths (1/10's) of a millimeter, is needed to measure a bezel to determine the correctly-sized crystal. Bezels have slightly larger diameters inside the "bottom" of their groove, than inside their upper rim. To find the correct crystal size, one needs to measure that larger inside diameter. This is because the correctly-sized crystal is held in place by the upper rim, such that cement is not needed for a correctly-sized crystal. It simply 'snaps' into place.

Then, depending upon whether the measurement is in inches or millimeters, use the appropriate chart to find the right crystal size. Or, crystal suppliers ought to be able to furnish a correctly-sized crystal directly from your measurement. Depending upon the cost of the crystals, it might be advisable to get one or two sizes immediately larger and smaller than the one indicated by the measurement, especially if expect to continue collecting the same size watches.

Crystal Charts
The Crown crystal size chart, and its explanation,
Can Be Viewed Online. Also, thanks to Steve Maddox, we have access to a Crystal Size to Decimal Inch Conversion Chart.

You can avoid all of the charts and figuring sizes out by simply measuring the inside diameter of the bezel and contacting a supplier with the measurement. Anybody who sells crystals should be able to work from that

Watch Materials are available from:
Brian Cavanaugh, pwpartsetc@pwatch.com
Bryan Eyring, bdeyring@hotmail.com
Jules Borel
Dashto
Otto Frei
Past Time Pocket Watch Parts LLC
Uncle Larry's Watch Shop

Mounting the Crystal
When a glass crystal is sized correctly to the metal bezel that holds it, it is an interference fit. To fit a crystal into the bezel, set the bezel on a flat surface, facing upward, and place the crystal on top. If the crystal is slightly too small, it will drop right into place and be loose within the bezel. A correctly-sized crystal will "almost" fit within the inner rim of the bezel, appearing to extend beyond the rim of the bezel by a tiny amount. If this is a crystal that had previously resided in the bezel, it is correctly sized. If it is a new crystal, be careful that it is not too large for the bezel. The correctly-sized crystal can be "snapped" into place by placing your thumbs on opposite sides of the bezel, overlapping the crystal. As you press down firmly (but not excessively) and roll your thumbs together, the correctly-sized crystal will seat with an audible "snapping" sound.

Cementing the Crystal in Place
If the crystal is slightly too small, and a correctly-sized crystal is not immediately available, it can be held in place by the use of crystal cement. This is viewed as a less-than-ideal situation, but nevertheless, many of us go this route. Crystal cement, available from watch material supply houses - see above, is specially formulated to prevent the release of gases that can leave a residue on the crystal and also to stay slightly pliable. If you don't see crystal cement listed on the above websites, contact them and ask about it. Crystal cement is somewhat removable, more so than many household cements (which shouldn't be used).

Good luck,
 

X6StringerX

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Wow! This thread has been very insightful. I appreciate all of the replies.
 

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