• The Bulletins and Marts are again available online. The network connectivity problem has been fixed. Thank you all very much for your patience.

Help with fixing a Black Forest clock

Jessk09

NAWCC Member
Feb 27, 2020
265
38
28
Country
I have just acquired this antique Black Forest clock, which in turn needs a good cleaning, weights, chains, and a pendulum.


Measurements: Movement:
6 by 6 inch dial Wood, with brass gearing
10 inch total height. 4 inches in width
10 inch total width. 4 & 1/2 inches tall
Photo’s attached below:


image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg
 

Jessk09

NAWCC Member
Feb 27, 2020
265
38
28
Country
What i need help with is finding the correct size pendulum, chains, and weights plus taking out the movt. For cleaning and to fix the count wheel, [ it’s currently flopping around ]

image.jpg
 

Uhralt

NAWCC Member
Sep 4, 2008
5,293
706
113
Country
Region
You will need to do some measuring and experiments to answer some of your questions. In order to take the movement apart for cleaning, you need to remove the dial and the back plate. Once the back plate has been removed, there are two wooden panels that can be removed. One is for the time train, the other for the strike train. The panels are attached to the frame by a nail at the top of the panel. When the nail has been pulled, the panel can be pushed outwards from the top. The count wheel is usually held in place by a wire spring that puts light pressure on the wheel. That spring might be broken, lost or just not correctly attached. The weights will be in the 500 to 750 gm range. To determine the correct length of the pendulum it is best to make an experimental pendulum from some stiff wire and a little weight for a bob. Once you determined a length, you can look for a suitable pendulum at supply houses or places like ebay. The problem is that these clocks were made with different pendulum lengths, so one cannot give you a definite answer without doing the experiment or doing a full teeth count.

The correct size of the chains can be found by measuring the distance between the sprockets of the sprocket wheel. The chain must be such that the length of two links equals the distance between the sprockets, measured where the chain touches the sprocket wheel. The width of the chain links should be such that it fits nicely in the space the wheel provides.

i hope this is helpful.

Uhralt
 
  • Like
Reactions: Roy Gardner

Jessk09

NAWCC Member
Feb 27, 2020
265
38
28
Country
Thanks for the suggestion Uhralt, But the dial seems to be nailed in and so does the backplate.

image.jpg image.jpg
 

Uhralt

NAWCC Member
Sep 4, 2008
5,293
706
113
Country
Region
Thanks for the suggestion Uhralt, But the dial seems to be nailed in and so does the backplate.

View attachment 680701 View attachment 680702
You should be able to remove both the dial and the back plate. Your first picture shows two hooks that hold the dial. There will be another one or two on the other side of the case. These hooks can be pushed out to the site. Take a close look and you will see in which direction to push.
The back plate can be removed by sliding a thin, flat screwdriver (or a solid knife blade) between backplate and case and wiggle the plate loose. This is best done close to the nails to avoid damage.

Uhralt
 

Burkhard Rasch

NAWCC Member
Jun 1, 2007
4,994
243
63
65
Twistringen
Country
Region
the nails that hold the plates firmly in the cage sit in recesses of the top board, often filled with the grim of centuries.Take a loupe and a dry brush to find these recesses,sometimes the grim has to be scratched out with a knife before getting access to the nail head.HTH
Burkhard
 

Forum statistics

Threads
169,694
Messages
1,481,173
Members
49,098
Latest member
Heresolong
Encyclopedia Pages
1,060
Total wiki contributions
2,965
Last update
-