• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Help to put it back.It dropped and not sure how to put it back in.Begging for a sample photo of

MuseChaser

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Feb 5, 2019
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Mary Pete ---

I'm very new at this stuff, so I might not have this exactly correct but I'll try and get you started. The short story is that I think there's a part missing... the suspension spring... that is not shown in either of your pictures. I've annotated your pictures and the letters and numbers below refer to those pictures..

backplate.jpg Parts.jpg

Okay.. the middle part, indicated by "A" in the picture on the right, is the anchor or verge that engages and regulates the escape wheel inside the movement. There should be a little thin pin, called a pivot, protruding from the spindle indicated by "A" and that pin would probably fit into the hole marked "B" in that other part (the "saddle," I think). It looks like the saddle would be held, through holes 1 and 2, to the backplate using screws 1 and 2 in the picture on the left, but I can't tell for SURE, and you want to look inside the movement to make sure those screws are not holding ANYTHING else in place before loosening them.

Under no circumstances should you loosen any screws that hold the front plate of the movement to the backplate of the movement (shown in the picture on the left) without FULLY releasing the mainsprings.

At the other end of the spindle ("A"), called an "arbor," should be another tiny pin that will go into a matching hole in the front plate that I can't quite make out in your picture, but it should be somewhere around where arrow "F" indicates. If the anchor is installed correctly, it should rotate freely and the two little tiny curved pieces of metal protruding from the anchor (called "pallets") should alternately engage teeth in the escape wheel just below it inside the movement.

Now.. between the part indicated by "C," and the part indicated by "D" at the top of the pendulum, there should be a flat spring of some kind, held in place by the pin at C, and usually a hook at D or another pin of some kind. I don't see that spring anywhere, and you need it. Others with WAY more experience can probably tell you exactly what movement you have just by looking at it, and what spring you need, but I don't have that experience or knowledge.

The parts indicated by the double headed arrow should fit together where indicated; the pendulum shaft rides inside that slot in the verge.

I hope that helps somewhat. I'm not sure you'll be able to just reassemble the clock, even if you had the spring, and expect it to run after having dropped it. Also not sure how that saddle came off the two screws holding it in place from a drop? My gut tells me you may need to take it to a shop.
 

bikerclockguy

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Jul 22, 2017
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I suggested your post be moved to the clock repair section, where you will be more likely to get the help you need. I’ve never seen an escapement like this, but I’m sure there are others who will jump in and point you in the right direction.
 
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JimmyOz

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Feb 21, 2008
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Follow Muse Chasers directions to put it back together.

To get the right size suspension spring, when you have the other parts on the clock (A and C) hold the pendulum in the slot at the bottom of A and balance the distance between the bottom and top of the narrow part of the pendulum while in that slot, then measure the distance from the inside top of the hook on the pendulum to the hole in C is about the right length of the suspension spring. Search Goggle forTimesavers and look at suspension springs with a hole in the top and a pin in the bottom and marry up the size as best you can.
Your clock is a Gustav Becker, a search will give you loads of info on him.
 

shutterbug

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There is usually enough adjustment on the pendulum to compensate for just about any suspension spring. You could get an assortment if you like.
 

bikerclockguy

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Jul 22, 2017
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I think we’ve all missed something here. See pic below; I think the crutch rod is broker 3ED723F0-AC34-45CF-AE27-06B6FD0E5772.jpeg
 

shutterbug

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I can't tell if it's broken or bent at a 90° angle.
 

MuseChaser

NAWCC Member
Feb 5, 2019
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I can't tell if it's broken or bent at a 90° angle.
I agree..looks like a pair of 90 degree bends to create on offset, although the corner is very well-defined and sharp for a bend.
 

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