Help on Jones & Frisbie Ogee

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by brunsonogee, Apr 25, 2014.

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  1. brunsonogee

    brunsonogee New Member

    Apr 25, 2014
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    I am asking for help on gathering information on a Jones & Frisbie ogee clock that has been in our family.
    It has brass works and is in need of some repairs. I believe it was made circa 1840.
    The instructions label is in relatively good condition, and the top part of the label reads:

    Improved Patent
    Brass Clock
    Made and Sold By
    Jones & Frisbie
    New Hartford, CT
    Warranted Good
    Directions for setting the clock.....(etc., etc.)

    Thank you for any further details on history, the makers, the company, how many were produced, etc. that you can provide.
     
  2. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
    NAWCC Member

    Jan 15, 2004
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    Seems to be the Jones & Frisbie (also possibly spelled Frisbee) who partnered in making and selling OG clocks in New Hartford ca. 1830-40. Frisbie is Isaac Porter Frisbie, but the Jones was not identified. This is the bit of information available from Spittlers and Bailey's Clockmakers & Watchmakers of America. Not much seems known, but apparently Frisbie also made wood works shelf clocks.
     
  3. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Jan 15, 2004
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    Searching further, I have found that the NAWCC Bulletin has had a few mentions of Jones & Frisbie over the years. This article (October 1985 issue, pages 608-09) identifies Jones as one Henry Jones. It is an interesting read, as it was an inquiry initiated by the great-grandson of Henry Jones. It places Jones' clockmaking ventures in the 1840's for a short period only. This information came from the grandmother of Henry Jones' great grandson, but is disputed by other family members who want to place the clockmaking ventures in the 1850's. Well, that's family memories for you.

    Unfortunately, the article is accessible only by members of the NAWCC.
     
  4. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Sep 4, 2005
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    A photo of the movement and the label (with any info identifying the printer) may help date the clock. According to Snowden Taylor's research, Jones & Frisbie made their own movements and may have purchased movements from others, as well (Elisha Manross and H. Welton & Co.).
    Mike
     
  5. brunsonogee

    brunsonogee New Member

    Apr 25, 2014
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    Copy of P1120334 ogee clock label.jpg Copy of P1120344 painted glass.JPG P1120335 clock works.jpg P1120332 ogee  Jones & Frisbie clock c1840.jpg
    In response to comments, I am attaching some pictures of the ogee. I have not been able to identify a printer's name on the label in the clock. Hope these pictures provide some clues. I have a picture of the clock face, but it exceeds the allowed memory capacity. Thanks for your comments.
    Sheldon
     
  6. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Sep 4, 2005
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    Sheldon,

    Thanks for posting images of the clock. Using a revised version of Snowden Taylor's movement ID table, your movement appears to be a type 5.42 by Jones & Frisbie. Snowden notes that the hole in the movement seatboard where the hammer passes through is round. Joseph Hurlbut of Hartford, CT was printing labels similar to yours for Chauncey Jerome around 1843. That's not to say that Hurlbut printed yours, but it's a possibility. The tablet has unfortunately seen better days, but it is a William Fenn. A slightly different version is shown on the inside back cover of the blue Fenn book. All things considered, not a common clock.

    Mike
     

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