Help mounting movement to case

Vernon

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Dec 9, 2006
835
90
28
Country
Region
This New England box clock came with the movement detached. When the dial was removed, everything just fell out. There was some small strips of wood with holes and shadow evidence on the brass movement of where the wood once was. It appears that small riveted nails held these wood strips to the brass movement. Am I right in this assumption? Do I need to remove these riveted nails and attach new wood as pictured with new riveted nails?
Thank you.

IMG_20190608_144537.jpg IMG_20190606_130915.jpg IMG_20190606_130915.jpg IMG_20190606_131025.jpg
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
12,774
987
113
Are the top 'nails' missing? Most will probably tell you to duplicate what was there. Although 'what was there' doesn't look so good, I would probably duplicate it, just to preserve the origanility and use the old holes.

These "nails" may be similar to cut tacks. Square cut nails and tacks are simply driven into an undersize hole and they bite really well. I would probably use small machine screws and nuts to make something a little more practical.

Looks like you may have 'bigger fish to fry' with that movement ...

Good luck, Willie X
 

Vernon

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Dec 9, 2006
835
90
28
Country
Region
I agree! Here are a couple more shots one showing the upper nails.

IMG_20190606_130817.jpg IMG_20190606_131644.jpg
 

Steven Thornberry

User Administrator
NAWCC Member
Jan 15, 2004
22,710
1,236
113
Here and there
Country
I believe you are correct in your assumption. The wood strips seem to have been held on much like they are on this movement.

Cottage Movement back.JPG

Unless you get lucky, you probably will not be able to re-use the original riveted nails, which leaves no alternative but to use new ones.
 

shutterbug

Moderator
NAWCC Member
Oct 19, 2005
44,264
1,346
113
North Carolina
Country
Region
Another possibility is that the thin strips were used to secure the movement at the edges of the back plate. In those cases though, the wood strips usually had grooves cut into them.
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
12,774
987
113
These old movements are always interesting to me. It's difficult to figure out the reasoning on a lot of the features. On this one it looks like they were determined to get the plates up against the top of the case? And what a reach to get the MS loop to that distant pillar. Those square cutouts at the top corners means they needed that material elsewhere ... looks like they could have used it where it was too. Ha

Glad you are restoring it, Willie X
 

Vernon

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Dec 9, 2006
835
90
28
Country
Region
Another possibility is that the thin strips were used to secure the movement at the edges of the back plate. In those cases though, the wood strips usually had grooves cut into them.
Shutterbug,
I had thought about that originally but in the first picture in post 1 is a piece of wood that I believe was used and there is no slot along it's length and it's too thin to allow for it.

Steven,
Thanks for your photo. It was interesting to view.
Willie,
Yes the movement is positioned at the very top. There is even a slot in the case to allow for the ew. although it's rather deep and wide.
Thanks all for your help and encouragement
 
Our 2021 National Meeting in Hampton Roads Virginia
Topic related ad experiment
Know Your NAWCC Forums Rules!
RULES & GUIDELINES

Find member

Forum statistics

Threads
160,783
Messages
1,394,999
Members
82,834
Latest member
machv5
Encyclopedia Pages
1,099
Total wiki contributions
2,778
Last edit
Beat Setting 101 by Tom McIntyre