• The online Bulletins and Mart and Highlights are currently unavailable due to a failure of a network piece of equipment. We are working to replace it and have the Online publications available as soon as possible. Thank you for your patience.

Help Me Decide Please

projump2001

Registered User
Aug 30, 2021
12
0
1
40
Country
I have two options.
a 10-15 year old HM that is in great condition for $300 said he has the manual and instructions and it was his mothers who did not wind it much so it was not used as much as typical for the age.
or
1987 Sligh in great condition. for $950 but will try to get for $700 which is my max.

I just cant decide, i worry that sligh is out of business and howard miller is still in business and best if needed parts in the future.

pictures attached.

my wife is upset with me because i am obsessing about these clocks.

sligh.jpg 00A0A_jkyDDaWcJP3z_0t20CI_1200x900.jpg
 

Ticktocktime100

Registered User
Nov 11, 2012
1,439
144
63
France
www.collectorsweekly.com
Country
Hi,

In my opinion, the clocks are much of a muchness and from that perspective, also taking into consideration the fragile market for these clocks, I would certainly go for the Howard Miller which is decently priced. The other is far too expensive, before or after negotiation. Furthermore, your thinking regarding HM and potentially needed parts is wise.

Regards.
 
  • Like
Reactions: projump2001

projump2001

Registered User
Aug 30, 2021
12
0
1
40
Country
Hi,

In my opinion, the clocks are much of a muchness and from that perspective, also taking into consideration the fragile market for these clocks, I would certainly go for the Howard Miller which is decently priced. The other is far too expensive, before or after negotiation. Furthermore, your thinking regarding HM and potentially needed parts is wise.

Regards.

thank you so much, ill go with the HM, not to mention the seller saw that i was a realtor and he is in the process of getting his house for sale and wants me to look at it, win win..

thanks so much.
 

ChimeTime

Registered User
May 4, 2021
224
80
28
71
NE Georgia
Country
Region
The $300 is in the top end of what these clocks go for in my area. And the prices are dropping, not rising. While both parties may have paid several thousands way back when, the price today has to reflect today's value.

Before you get too carried away, I'd look on FB Marketplace and Craigslist for comps. One way to make the spouse feel better is to buy the same clock for $125 !! I kid you not, there are 2 GF clocks in my local area where the ad says to come pick them up. True, a lot of them under $100 are missing expensive pieces, like weights, but they are there.

Hope this helps.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dave T

new2clocks

NAWCC Member
Apr 25, 2005
3,644
587
113
Pennsylvania
Country
Region
I have two options.
a 10-15 year old HM that is in great condition for $300 said he has the manual and instructions and it was his mothers who did not wind it much so it was not used as much as typical for the age.
or
1987 Sligh in great condition. for $950 but will try to get for $700 which is my max.

I just cant decide, i worry that sligh is out of business and howard miller is still in business and best if needed parts in the future.

pictures attached.

my wife is upset with me because i am obsessing about these clocks.

View attachment 669954 View attachment 669955
Welcome to the forum.

Are you looking for a piece of furniture or are you looking for a well made clock that also looks good?

For the same price or less, you can purchase a true antique tall case clock, made with movements that have lasted 100 plus years and will last 100 plus more years with the proper service.

The movements in clocks from 1987 and newer are not well regarded and some would state that the movement will need to be replaced soon. The replacement movements are also not held in high esteem.

If you are looking at the clock as a piece of furniture and do not care about the clock works, it is my belief that you can acquire an antique with a similar looking case and with a movement that will function for many, many years. And this will be at the same or lesser price. Clock prices, especially for tall case clocks, are very depressed now and bargains can be found relatively easily.

Regards.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bruce Alexander

projump2001

Registered User
Aug 30, 2021
12
0
1
40
Country
The $300 is in the top end of what these clocks go for in my area. And the prices are dropping, not rising. While both parties may have paid several thousands way back when, the price today has to reflect today's value.

Before you get too carried away, I'd look on FB Marketplace and Craigslist for comps. One way to make the spouse feel better is to buy the same clock for $125 !! I kid you not, there are 2 GF clocks in my local area where the ad says to come pick them up. True, a lot of them under $100 are missing expensive pieces, like weights, but they are there.

Hope this helps.
I've been looking on FB and CL on file now it seems like in my area 300 is the lowest I've seen.

Can't find anything antique for less
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
15,010
1,867
113
I would keep looking.

If you spring for the H-M, beware that 10 to 15 years can easily become 20 to 30 years! And, keep in mind that the post 2000 H-M/Kieninger movements are pretty crappy at any age.

An older (pre 1980) non working modern clock will usually have a much better case than the newer ones and you can easily replace the movement. So, you can come out with a nicer case and a brand new movement for around 3 to 5 Benjimans. 100 max for the case, 200 to 360 for a new movement.

The Sligh clock would not be a consideration for me, basically you're only buying a case.

Willie X
 

Ticktocktime100

Registered User
Nov 11, 2012
1,439
144
63
France
www.collectorsweekly.com
Country
I've been looking on FB and CL on file now it seems like in my area 300 is the lowest I've seen.

Can't find anything antique for less
Others have volunteered advice on purchasing, which I certainly agree with. I thought your question was merely to choose between the two clocks shown. Personally, I too would always go for a good, dependable antique example which may take longer to find, and perhaps more money (or not), but it will give you far greater satisfaction and pleasure both as a clock and a piece of furniture.

Regards.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ChimeTime

shutterbug

Moderator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Oct 19, 2005
47,574
2,216
113
North Carolina
Country
Region
IF the HM has a Hermle movement, you might be able to get a manufacturing date on the back plate. That one is a better gamble than the other in my opinion.
 

projump2001

Registered User
Aug 30, 2021
12
0
1
40
Country
Probably going to pick this up on Saturday I'm pretty excited about it. I know it's nothing super fancy but it's a start. Eventually keep an eye out for something better and I could just donate this one or sell it hopefully for almost what I paid for it.
 

bruce linde

ADMIN / MODERATOR
NAWCC Member
Donor
Nov 13, 2011
9,279
1,525
113
oakland, ca.
clockhappy.com
Country
Region
don't want to dampen anyone's excitement, but i did buy this 1780 beauty off of my local craigslist for $500.... it came with three brass finials that had obviously been added later, so i sold them on ebay for $100-ish... bringing my total cost down to $400.

the movement in mine has been running for over 240 years... just sayin' there are quality clocks to be had out there for those willing to put in the time (so to speak)....

image_28.jpg
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
15,010
1,867
113
Nice 'between the wars' German GF clocks are some of my favorites. Generally available for about the same money the OP is talking about. I like the big simple strikers with low frequency gongs ... Yeah baby!

I worked on one a few weeks ago that had twin 10" gongs struck with a single giant hammer. Willie X
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

NAWCC Member
Nov 26, 2009
6,021
1,322
113
Country
I have two options.
a 10-15 year old HM that is in great condition for $300 said he has the manual and instructions and it was his mothers who did not wind it much so it was not used as much as typical for the age.
or
1987 Sligh in great condition. for $950 but will try to get for $700 which is my max.

I just cant decide, i worry that sligh is out of business and howard miller is still in business and best if needed parts in the future.

pictures attached.

my wife is upset with me because i am obsessing about these clocks.

View attachment 669954 View attachment 669955
Sorry, can't contain myself any longer.

WHAT?

I see good English and Scottish clocks selling for about what you're willing to spend.

The movements may require a cleaning/oiling and the cases some TLC.

You're getting a hand painted decorative dial and a case made by a cabinet maker, often with nice veneers. The movements have lasted > 100 years and unless abused, can last another 100.

That's not what you will get with the clocks you're considering. Quite the opposite.

But it's your money. Do as you will

RM
 

Schatznut

NAWCC Member
Sep 26, 2020
573
233
43
SoCal
Country
Region
Projump, I'm not a tall case clock expert by any means, and my pocketbook is more in the Ridgeway category, but this looks more like something to keep forever than a late-model clock with a throw-away movement in it.
 

projump2001

Registered User
Aug 30, 2021
12
0
1
40
Country
Projump, I'm not a tall case clock expert by any means, and my pocketbook is more in the Ridgeway category, but this looks more like something to keep forever than a late-model clock with a throw-away movement in it.
You would think the newer modern movements with the machined parts would be better than these older movements. What gives
 

Isaac

Registered User
Aug 5, 2013
1,185
300
83
Country
Region
You would think the newer modern movements with the machined parts would be better than these older movements. What gives
Plated pivots, thin brass plates. Newer movements are designed to be replaced easier than being repaired versus antique movements. If you take decent care of a antique clock movement with preventive servicing (and proper cleaning), there's a high chance that it'll last you your lifetime.
 

Schatznut

NAWCC Member
Sep 26, 2020
573
233
43
SoCal
Country
Region
Plated pivots, thin brass plates. Newer movements are designed to be replaced easier than being repaired versus antique movements. If you take decent care of a antique clock movement with preventive servicing (and proper cleaning), there's a high chance that it'll last you your lifetime.
Isaac describes the Achilles' heels of many modern clock movements. If you want a hair-raising adventure, research "plated pivots" on this site. Nickle plating of the arbors and pivots was a good idea in theory but poorly executed, which resulted in untold numbers of clock mechanisms made in the late 20th century grinding themselves to death in a matter of 10 to 20 years. By the time you had one of the original two clocks you posted in this thread either rebuilt or equipped with a new movement, you'd probably have about as much invested in them as you would pay for the 19th-century clock which has already survived for what, almost 200 years? Think craftsmanship versus bang 'em out as fast and cheaply as you can.

It is a certainty that all of the clocks you're looking at will need a major overhaul. But the decision should be based on what you'll have when you get done - a hand-built movement with a fine wood case or a throw-away movement with a mass-produced case.

The dial on the old one is exquisite! I hope it's original. Even if not, that clock looks like a real treasure.
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
15,010
1,867
113
Yep, the old clocks were made to last and the new ones are made to sell ...

To complicate things, the selling has become a major problem lately.

Willie X
 
  • Like
Reactions: Darrmann39

bruce linde

ADMIN / MODERATOR
NAWCC Member
Donor
Nov 13, 2011
9,279
1,525
113
oakland, ca.
clockhappy.com
Country
Region
Plated pivots, thin brass plates. Newer movements are designed to be replaced easier than being repaired versus antique movements. If you take decent care of a antique clock movement with preventive servicing (and proper cleaning), there's a high chance that it'll last you your lifetime.

they don’t make ‘em like they used to. clocks made in the 60s and 70s and on have movements with a built-in life span of maybe 25 years. the folks who made clocks prior to the early 1900s had different… and higher… standards.

and, to add to what willie just said, the market is softer than butter left in a hot sun.... you have more buying/bargaining power than you might think.... i doubt you will have a lot of competition, so you might try floating an offer of $1000 (for example), as you'll have to spend $300 (or more) to get it serviced....
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
15,010
1,867
113
What Bruce said.

If you want to buy some clocks, you are a very rare person and should be 'as happy as a clam', 'a lucky duck', etc. etc. etc. !

If you want to sell some clocks, you are in a very sad position. Ha

Willie X
 

Schatznut

NAWCC Member
Sep 26, 2020
573
233
43
SoCal
Country
Region
Put on your poker face and make a low-ball offer. The worst that could happen is they would say no. Then you can still go out and buy one of the modern ones. What have you got to lose?
 

Isaac

Registered User
Aug 5, 2013
1,185
300
83
Country
Region
Congratulations on your new acquisition. It matches the wood panels well.
 

projump2001

Registered User
Aug 30, 2021
12
0
1
40
Country
i moved it to the left a smudge. kitty corner will not work because you will not be able to see this when you enter the front door of the house. Ill consider it tho.

for oiling the clocks, HM sells clock oil for $33 is that a fair price or a money grab? what do you guys use?
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
15,010
1,867
113
That's a ridiculous price for oil.

Any of the oils sold by the clock supply places will be good, or you can buy a quart of Mobil 1, 5W-20 for about 7 bucks.
Use the rest in your car or lawnmower. You will only need a few drops for the clock.

Willie X
 

Schatznut

NAWCC Member
Sep 26, 2020
573
233
43
SoCal
Country
Region
What Willie said. Modern synthetic automotive oils are good choices for clocks because they don't evaporate or oxidize, they've always got the very latest lubrication technology in them, and they're incredibly cheap.
 

projump2001

Registered User
Aug 30, 2021
12
0
1
40
Country
any advice on how i can do this myself? what kind of tool do i use to get the oil on the parts being that its motor oil. i was thinking of just buying the $11 oil on amazon for the simple fact that it has the needle on the bottle. perhaps a syringe? or just use a tooth pic . let me know
 

steamer471

NAWCC Member
Nov 2, 2013
649
142
43
56
Charlotte NC
Country
Region
It's been my experience the needles on those bottles dispense way too much oil. Tooth pick or a sewing needle will give you more control.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ChimeTime

JTD

Registered User
Sep 27, 2005
9,184
863
113
Country
Yes, use a needle. Stick a sewing needle into a cork. The cork makes a convenient handle and gives you good control. The eye of the needle will hold just enough oil for one or two pivots.

You can make a set of oilers in this way, using needles of varying sizes. Or you can just buy a set of oilers from one of the materials suppliers - they are not expensive.

JTD
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bruce Alexander

Teckelhut

NAWCC Member
May 10, 2021
51
16
8
59
Oregon
www.teckelhut.com
Country
Region
Any good experienced clock smith can repair any of those. NONE of my clocks here are made by companies that are still in business yet they were restored and are being serviced when they need to be. The oldest one I have is a 1823 Eli Terry Connecticut Shelf Clock. My clock smith friend (50 years experience and proud NAWCC member) was able to restore it to fully functional.

NOTE: DO not buy a clock made in China or Korea. The movements were made in such a way that they can't be fixed. But they are throw away clocks anyway. Meaning that they are good runners but if they ever do go just buy another one.
 

ChimeTime

Registered User
May 4, 2021
224
80
28
71
NE Georgia
Country
Region
I have a set of used dental tools I picked up on Ebay for poking and prodding small things. Due to the length and oddly angled ends, some of those are excellent for applying oil in hard to reach places.

The problem with too much oil is the oil's surface tension. If the oil "runs", then the drip will pull the rest of the oil out of the pivot. So when oiling, less is more.
 

Bruce Alexander

Sponsor
NAWCC Brass Member
Feb 22, 2010
7,627
880
113
Hanover, PA
www.testoftimeclocks.com
Country
Region
If the movement and pivots are dirty, the oil won't lubricate, it will become a cutting fluid. If you would like advice on the movement, we'll need to see what you're working with and what kind of condition it is in (lots of well lit closeups).

Good luck and welcome
 

Forum statistics

Threads
168,897
Messages
1,473,772
Members
48,643
Latest member
john33g
Encyclopedia Pages
1,060
Total wiki contributions
2,955
Last update
-