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Help ID'g a 19th-Century Clock

Girl59

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Oct 31, 2021
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Haven't been here for weeks and weeks...caught up in holidays. During that time, I received an email from a distant cousin, with a picture of a clock (unfortunately, pic was taken in 1990s, he says). The piece was given as a wedding gift to an ancestral couple in the mid-1860s, as far as he knows; they lived in far southwest Virginia -- Wythe County. Not sure who has the clock now or if it's possible to get better/more photos. Any ideas? My primary interest is in pocket watches, which just starting to learn about, so I know nothing about clocks. Any insight on type, materials, movement, make, etc. appreciated. Big thanks, and good to be back.

Granny Eanes Clock.jpg
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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I'm pretty sure it's not that old. I'm thinking more like 1910? Others will have the details. Willie X
 

Steven Thornberry

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Jan 15, 2004
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It's a Sessions Clock Co. clock, called the Grand No. 1. Tran Duy Ly's book on Sessions clocks shows it from the 1915 catalogue. It may have been offered a few years earlier or later. The 1860's is far too early for this style of clock (steam pressed oak), which began to be popular about 1890. Sessions came into business in 1903 as the successor to the E.N. Welch Manufacturing Co.

The wood seems to have been darkened, unless that is a trick of the camera. The case would have been lighter in color.
 

Girl59

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Oct 31, 2021
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It's a Sessions Clock Co. clock, called the Grand No. 1. Tran Duy Ly's book on Sessions clocks shows it from the 1915 catalogue. It may have been offered a few years earlier or later. The 1860's is far too early for this style of clock (steam pressed oak), which began to be popular about 1890. Sessions came into business in 1903 as the successor to the E.N. Welch Manufacturing Co.

The wood seems to have been darkened, unless that is a trick of the camera. The case would have been lighter in color.
Willie and Steven, Thanks so much for the insight. My cousin will be disappointed to hear that the clock is not as old as he was told. Maybe it was a gift to "Granny Eanes" in her older age and not at her marriage, or to one of her children; she died in 1919. I'll pass along the good details. The knowledge here never fails to amaze me :)
 

Girl59

Registered User
Oct 31, 2021
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Willie and Steven, Thanks so much for the insight. My cousin will be disappointed to hear that the clock is not as old as he was told. Maybe it was a gift to "Granny Eanes" in her older age and not at her marriage, or to one of her children; she died in 1919. I'll pass along the good details. The knowledge here never fails to amaze me :)
Another quick question...Is this a decent-quality, middle-of-the-road clock? If it doesn't run, is it worth fixing? Any idea where it might have been made?
 

JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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Another quick question...Is this a decent-quality, middle-of-the-road clock? If it doesn't run, is it worth fixing? Any idea where it might have been made?
It's an American clock, Sessions took over E. N. Welch in Forestville Connecticut.

These clocks, which came in dozens of different styled cases and were made by several companies, were made in their thousands and were not expensive when new. However they are well made and run for many years if cared for. These clocks are often called 'kitchen clocks' and sometimes 'gingerbread clocks' (because of the fancy cases).

It's not a valuable clock in itself, the value for you lies in the fact that it is a family heirloom and it's therefore priceless.

JTD
 
Last edited:

Girl59

Registered User
Oct 31, 2021
62
45
18
59
Country
It's and American clock, Sessions took over E. N. Welch in Forestville Connecticut.

These clocks, which came in dozens of different styled cases and were made by several companies, were made in their thousands and were not expensive when new. However they are well made and run for many years if cared for. These clocks are often called 'kitchen clocks' and sometimes 'gingerbread clocks' (because of the fancy cases).

It's not a valuable clock in itself, the value for you lies in the fact that it is a family heirloom and it's therefore priceless.

JTD
JTD, thank you. These details will be great to pass along to my distant cousin, who I've never met. I'm sure he will want to know as much about the piece as possible, since it's, as you say, a family heirloom. Even though it's not mine, I hope someone will take it in for some cleaning and repair. I love imagining it in the home of my great-great-great aunt.
 

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