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Help Identifying unusual clock Warren clock co for GE

MikeH1978

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Oct 24, 2016
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I recently picked up this clock but cannot find any information about it or what it was used for. Any help would be great. Inside plate warren clock co for General Electric type B-2 IMG_4436.jpg IMG_4448.jpg IMG_4447.jpg IMG_4446.jpg IMG_4445.jpg IMG_4444.jpg IMG_4439.jpg IMG_4438.jpg IMG_4437.jpg IMG_4451.jpg
 

chefk

Registered User
Jun 15, 2013
8
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Looks like a nice heavy GE commercial/industrial clock. B-2 is the rotor type, that tips you off it is old and anytime you find "Warren Clock Co." on the metal ID tag you know you have a very old Telechron, the name was changed to "Warren Telechron Co." in 1926. I have a somewhat similar but more recent version, labelled as a GE Type C-14, it has the same heavy glass lens in cast iron ring that twists off counter-clockwise but mine has a bakelite back plate and the crappy B-13 rotor.

Discussion and pictures of the C-14 here:

http://www.telechron.net/forager/index.php?topic=1295.0
 

ElectricTime

Registered User
NAWCC Business
Sep 28, 2002
245
25
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So you won this on ebay :(

I've never seen a clock like this before - and I've got a lot of telechron literature - I guess it's a interval timer - but it's a little weird - no indicator light when the circuit is on.
 

Dick C

Registered User
Oct 14, 2009
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Also at the top of the dial the "S" and "F" suggesting an adjustment possibility; however, I cannot see any way to adjust it?
 

Dick C

Registered User
Oct 14, 2009
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Is it possible that the dial and/or the movement were replaced at one time?

Also, it appears that on the bottom of the dial there is the indicator "NP 24118" or the 8 could be a 9.
 

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
13,666
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I can't see it clearly but I think the switch is for a power
failure indicator.
I could be wrong? is it actuated from a cam? It just looks like
a lever with a weight on it.
Tinker Dwight
 

Dick C

Registered User
Oct 14, 2009
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The best that I can come up with is an early/antique general electric "explosion proof" clock.

I did find a site with a later model for sale that had the same "N.P. ...." graphic on the dial.

If you google images for antique ge "explosion proof" clock later vintages of this type of clock can be found.

So how does it work?
 

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
13,666
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Calif. USA
I'm beginning to think it is a bell ringer.
It looks like it has a windup part that when
tripped would close and open the switch.
For mines, that would make sense. You wouldn't
want a normal bell with a switch in it.
Just another wild ### guess.
Tinker Dwight
 

Dick C

Registered User
Oct 14, 2009
1,762
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I'm beginning to think it is a bell ringer.
It looks like it has a windup part that when
tripped would close and open the switch.
For mines, that would make sense. You wouldn't
want a normal bell with a switch in it.
Just another wild ### guess.
Tinker Dwight
How would one set the bell time?
 

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
13,666
72
0
Calif. USA
It is probably not user settable. It could
be for shift and break times.
I think we need to hear from the OP. He is most
likely laughing at us now, talking about the options.
I would like to know what it does. It doesn't look like
the typical master clock. It would most likely be used
in mines or things like petroleum industry ( fire works? ).
Tinker Dwight
 

coldwar

Registered User
May 20, 2009
266
3
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www.hoagsclockshop.com
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This is a typical General Electric "A" case watt hour meter enclosure, of which I have many contemporaneous examples. My immediate hunch was the case and mech did not start life together, however I'd like to ask for you to snap a pic of the back of the case, and another of the mech removed from case, viewing the back of the mech. The dial appearance suggests Seth Thomas but I'd like to see pics of it a bit more apart, to offer a better opinion.

If this was made up for some purpose, it would not come as a surprise. "A" case meters were (are) customarily presented to retiring utility employees usually mounted and connected to some sort of table lamp, examples of which pop up on ebay on a regular basis. I have seen other special purpose meters presented this way which have complications, including those which have timepieces. This unit may have been a example of some kind of momento, but without a better look it's hard to know.
 

ElectricTime

Registered User
NAWCC Business
Sep 28, 2002
245
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I thought the same at first - but the electrical connections are not sealed - we used to make "Explosion proof clocks" - but there were very very serious sealing of electrical connections.
 

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
13,666
72
0
Calif. USA
I saw a lamp on ebay that had the exact same enclosure.
It had the watt meter in it.
Still, the instalation doesn't look like something someone
just hacked together.
Tinker Dwight
 

skruft

Registered User
Aug 5, 2002
300
1
18
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I have a few of these GE industrial clocks, not identical but similar. I could find no way to set them except with the hands. Some have a very basic mechanism that makes an electrical contact at one minute or one hour intervals. I have one that looks like a large size GE electrical meter, others larger that look like home electric meters.

I have never seen any literature or manuals for them. Does anyone have any?
 
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