Help identifying this pocket watch

Michael Goldman

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Aug 4, 2016
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Can anyone help me identify this pocket watch? Looks like it reads Eugene Tissot en Suisse. IMG_0166.jpg IMG_0174.jpg
 

gmorse

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Jan 7, 2011
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Hi Michael,

A watch very much in the English style of the period that Paul has suggested, but without any intent to deceive regarding its origins, unlike most other examples of Swiss products made in this pattern for the UK and American markets. Are there any markings inside the case?

Regards,

Graham
 

John Matthews

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Sep 22, 2015
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Michael - additional photographs of the case, dial and movement, would all help with identification.

Do you have a view of the side of the movement? One taken looking from the right hand side of the first photograph towards the cap jewel to show the movement between the plates would be helpful.

John
 

Michael Goldman

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Aug 4, 2016
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Hi Michael,

A watch very much in the English style of the period that Paul has suggested, but without any intent to deceive regarding its origins, unlike most other examples of Swiss products made in this pattern for the UK and American markets. Are there any markings inside the case?

Regards,

Graham
Thanks for the help. I usually stay with American pocket watches but buy the occasional unknown :) I have another mystery ( to me) I'll post soon.


B979C610-B173-4FB9-BC23-BC6E1E1E1E71.jpeg E414AEFB-122F-4032-9B4A-5281BE5B4AB3.jpeg 721F59B9-DB4F-47F3-885A-C946378332D3.jpeg IMG_0174.jpg
 
Last edited:

Lychnobius

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Aug 5, 2015
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This must be a very late verge, since British makers (whose style, as Graham has said, is being very closely followed here) rarely used the recessed seconds panel on enamel dials until the late 1850s – though admittedly the Swiss seem to have adopted it in the domestic market somewhat earlier.

Oliver Mundy.
 

gmorse

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Hi Michael,

Thanks for the pictures, which confirm, as Oliver has commented, that it's a verge fusee movement. Nobody knows who invented the verge, or when, (centuries ago), and they were largely superseded by various levers by the time this was made, but although effectively dead, they refused to lie down!

Regards,

Graham
 

John Matthews

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Sep 22, 2015
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If I ignore the lack of hallmarks on the case and the engraving on the back plate and barrel bridge, I would not consider that this was Swiss in origin. In fact, from what I can see in the photographs, I would not be surprised if the frame started life in Lancashire and it spent some time in Coventry.

John
 

gmorse

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Hi John,

I would not consider that this was Swiss in origin. In fact, from what I can see in the photographs, I would not be surprised if the
frame started life in Lancashire and it spent some time in Coventry
I'm not so sure that this watch did, but perhaps the maker did?

Regards,

Graham
 

John Matthews

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Sep 22, 2015
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Michael - we are struggling - it is definitely in the English style.

Graham has much more experience than me and he feels that it didn't start life on this side of the English Channel. However, I think it would be worth removing the dial to see if there are any identification marks on the pillar plate beneath.

John
 

gmorse

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Hi Michael,

So no good idea of where or when it's from?
The design of English watches evolved very slowly over much of the 19th century, and even if its country of origin is open to a little doubt, the date falls into the first half of the century as Oliver suggests, based on the design of the case and dial. The hands aren't a reliable indicator, not least because they've very often been replaced, being vulnerable to damage during setting.

There are a few factors which tend to suggest a Swiss rather than English origin, (although some may have been later alterations); the balance endstone is steel rather than a jewel, the barrel and fusee pivot holes in the top plate are unusually ringed, and the precedent of the Olivier Quartier watches mentioned by Paul. Although the vast majority of Swiss watches 'emulating' English ones were blatantly fakes, there were a few examples of Swiss products which were very hard to distinguish from the English article and even fewer which were actually signed for their Swiss producers with no hint of deception; I think yours sits alongside the Quartiers in this respect. The name 'Tissot' is very common in the watchmaking areas of Switzerland.

Regards,

Graham
 

Michael Goldman

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Aug 4, 2016
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Thank you very much! I will get around to taking off the dial to see if there are any other markings. It is worth the $90 US I paid for it just for the mystery. And it runs!
 

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