• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Help identifying this glass ball or loupe watch

Rob_GER

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Jun 9, 2020
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I have this glass ball watch and would like to know the manufacturer and the official name of this kind of watch. The glass ball is about 2.5 ich or 6 cm in diameter. On the rearside the only marks I could find were an „M“ a cross and the serial or Model number 7032 ( or 7082 the 3/8 is hard to read) . Any help is appreciated.
BTW yes I know that the hand for the seconds is not in its spot, it fell off and floats around the dial but so far I have not yet managed to open it to reattach the hand.

Thanks in advance!
Rob

FAF8D737-540D-423F-ABDD-3DC13B045AFC.jpeg 4DFC0EE0-0AC9-4211-9A0F-45CA5FDEB302.jpeg 2A127420-8424-4BB6-B76D-FB1F0DA88A25.jpeg A144BBDA-4E37-4491-9B78-056DB9112CBB.jpeg
 

JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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Swiss Patent (which is what the cross stands for) No. 7032 was granted to Amédée Douard (Snr.) in Bienne (Switzerland) in Jujly 1893.

I have always called these 'glass ball' watches - I don't know if there is a more official name.

Hoped this helps.

JTD
 
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Rob_GER

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Thanks JTD for the information, this helps. By coincidence you wouldn’t know how to open this kind of watch ( as I would like to reattach the seconds hand) but I don’t want to use too much force to break it.
Rob
 

JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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Thanks JTD for the information, this helps. By coincidence you wouldn’t know how to open this kind of watch ( as I would like to reattach the seconds hand) but I don’t want to use too much force to break it.
Rob
I think it depends on the watch. There are a lot of modern reproductions made in India and China and with them, the domed glass and bezel unscrews (anticlockwise).

With yours, I am not sure. There may be a catch you can press to release it. I had a look at the patent, but that does not have much to do with the actual case, so there is nothing there. Or perhaps it may just unscrew?

Sorry not to be more help. Others may have a better knowledge.

JTD
 

Rob_GER

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Hi JTD,
Thanks, yes mine is over 70 years old. . I tried to unscrew but nothing moved. I tried to simply pull but nothing moved. That’s why I’m scared that something might break if I use more force. I looked carefully and couldn’t find any knobs to press or catches.
i found a French version of the Patent online and read it but it was just about the movement.
But thanks for your input.

Rob
 

JTD

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Could you show us a photo of the edge of your clock?

JTD
 

Rob_GER

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Of course, here they come , left and right side. The button on the side moves something in the movement. there is a small gap visible and I tried to pry it open but no success.
Thanks
Rob

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JTD

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I have asked a clock maker friend of mine and he says that these usually are in two halves which are just a (tight) press fit and should come apart.

The little button may be to allow you to set the hands, if the crown is only for winding.

JTD
 
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Rob_GER

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Ok than I will try it again with a bit more force. Thanks for your help! If I’m successful I will post it .
Rob
 

roughbarked

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Force is too strong a word for any such watch. It is more about the edge of the tool. If the angle ground on the edge of the knife or tool is right then it should ony need a gentle pressure to pop the top and bottom off. Try not to lever or pry. You can see the damage that does in your pictures.
 
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Dr. Jon

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The small opening in your photo on the left is where the prying tool goes. A knife will work but the damage to the dial suggests what can go wrong. a single edge razor is good for doing this. The methid is to get the blade well into the groove and then twist the blade. There is some danger the blade will snap off so wear glasses to protect your eyes.
 
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roughbarked

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The damage to the dial is from being dropped or hit from the side. The enamel cracks and chips. If from the case knife, the damage would be scratches across the dial towards the hands. All such opening slots should be at the one and eleven sites so as to allow the and of the blade to hit the pendant and crown before skidding across the dial.
 

Rob_GER

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Thanks for the additional information, I think I will try to use razor blades once I bought some. I value this watch so I would never use excessive force on it as I fear to break it. Would it help to apply some oil to make the sliding easier or is there the risk that the oil moves somewhere where it would be difficult to clean it away from?
I would rather leave it in its current condition on the shelf.

But maybe you could advise me on how to remove some scratches it has in the glass (in the flat bid it stands on / wouldn’t dare to touch the round bit which luckily doesn’t have scratches). The scratches are not too deep but clearly visible.

thanks again for all the help / advise!

rob
 

JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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I think I will try to use razor blades once I bought some.
Well, if you do, make sure you buy the single edged ones, as has been said already by Dr. Jon. Ordinary razor blades are too thin and brittle.

Personally I would use a case knife, it seems from the photo you already have a space to get started, so it shouldn't be too difficult. I don't like razor blades for this job, but that's just my opinion.

JTD
 

Dr. Jon

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Do not apply oil. It will get into lots of things and it will make the blade slip. I suggest single edge razor baldes because they are thick and strong, easy to find and cheap. It you are willing to spend ore I prefer a special case opener which is a hook shape it unlikely to slip. They are available for watch tool suppliers.

Polishing out the scratches in the glass is not difficult but time consuming. It takes a bit if practice. I use auto body sandpaper which, in the US, is available as assortments you to 6000 grit. Put a piece of sandpaper on a flat surface. Iuse double sided tape to hold the sandpaper, and start with about a 400 grit and work up to the fines available. It takes a good touch to keep it flat.

There are specialists who grind scratches out of glass ware and one of them may near you and they can do this quickly.
 

Rob_GER

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Thanks Dr. Jon for your advise. I think I will give the polishing a try once I got the right sandpaper.
 

pmwas

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The small opening in your photo on the left is where the prying tool goes. A knife will work but the damage to the dial suggests what can go wrong. a single edge razor is good for doing this. The methid is to get the blade well into the groove and then twist the blade. There is some danger the blade will snap off so wear glasses to protect your eyes.
IMO the damage to the dial is a result of an attempt to remove the dial itself, not opening the case. These 3/4 (or full) plate Swiss watches often have a dial screw going through the top plates and someone might not realize. As he can’t find a screw on the side, he pries the dial off the movement causing serious damage.

There is a dial screw at 2 o’clock position indeed :)
 

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