Help identifying pocket watch

Josixpak

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Jan 22, 2021
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Hi all i would like some help if possible identifying this watch.
I would like to know what type of watch it is.
As well as the date it was made.
It has been in my family since new.
Any help will be much appreciated.
Thanks Trevor

20210123_124409.jpg 20210123_124504.jpg 20210123_124609.jpg 20210123_124626.jpg 20210123_125929.jpg
 

netsch20

Registered User
Nov 26, 2020
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It's 1898 based on the datemark, and it's an english (obviously) lever escapement.
 

netsch20

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Nov 26, 2020
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Thank you very much
I apologise that I don't have time this moment to do some more looking, but I googled Rotherhams London and found quite a few sources and threads on here you might want to check out
 

John Matthews

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Sep 22, 2015
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Your watch was made and cased by Rotherhams in their Coventry works. The case is hallmarked Birmingham 1927/28 and carries their maker's mark.

Can you please confirm the serial number? - I believe it to possibly be 408185, which would be compatible with the case hallmark date.

It is a typical Rotherhams three-quarter plate keyless going-barrel movement of the period, jewelled to the 3rd. There is a cap jewel on the balance; your photographs are not of sufficient resolution to confirm, but possible the lever and escape are also capped. The escapement is a single-roller detached lever escapement with a ratchet-tooth escape; it has a compensation balance, carrying a balance-spring with overcoil.

John
 

gmorse

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Jan 7, 2011
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Hi netsch20,

It's 1898 based on the datemark,
Because each assay office had its own specific series of date mark letters, the first thing to look at when interpreting English hallmarks is the town mark, which in this instance is Birmingham, (the anchor), and which changed its letter each year in July, so your case could have been assayed in either of the two years mentioned by John. The font and the shape of the cartouche are also relevant when establishing a date, because it's hard with some letters to distinguish between uppercase and lowercase.

Regards,

Graham
 

Josixpak

New Member
Jan 22, 2021
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1
3
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Your watch was made and cased by Rotherhams in their Coventry works. The case is hallmarked Birmingham 1927/28 and carries their maker's mark.

Can you please confirm the serial number? - I believe it to possibly be 408185, which would be compatible with the case hallmark date.

It is a typical Rotherhams three-quarter plate keyless going-barrel movement of the period, jewelled to the 3rd. There is a cap jewel on the balance; your photographs are not of sufficient resolution to confirm, but possible the lever and escape are also capped. The escapement is a single-roller detached lever escapement with a ratchet-tooth escape; it has a compensation balance, carrying a balance-spring with overcoil.

John
Hi yes that is the serial number on the watch
That is amazing that you know all this
Thank you so much for the information
Trevor
 

netsch20

Registered User
Nov 26, 2020
26
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Hi netsch20,



Because each assay office had its own specific series of date mark letters, the first thing to look at when interpreting English hallmarks is the town mark, which in this instance is Birmingham, (the anchor), and which changed its letter each year in July, so your case could have been assayed in either of the two years mentioned by John. The font and the shape of the cartouche are also relevant when establishing a date, because it's hard with some letters to distinguish between uppercase and lowercase.

Regards,

Graham
Ah yes, my apologies, I accidently clicked on the London datemarks chart rather than Birmingham one. Also looking at the correct chart, it's surprising how similar the 1902/27 marks are.

1927:
1611442604528.png

vs 1902:
1611442626553.png

With some wear, those could easily be indistinguishable from each other. I'd think they'd at least use a different shape in successive letter runs, but apparently not.
 

John Matthews

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Sep 22, 2015
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With some wear, those could easily be indistinguishable from each other.
You are correct - this is why you need to be very careful. The distinction is clear when they were originally stamped (the upper termination of the 'C')

1611470889293.png

1611470922319.png

John
 
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