Help Identifying Mantle Clock

Xtopher

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Dec 30, 2020
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I recently got this clock from someone who wanted it cleaned and running again who had never seen it run in the many years she had it. It's about 20 inches tall and has mother of pearl inlay with floral and gold painting. On the back of the dial there is writing indicating it was cleaned in 1867 and again in 1874. On the back where the movement is mounted there is more writing indicating a cleaning in 1850 and an address in Boston, MA. Sorry about the sideways images, I can't seem to get it to rotate.
IMG_7914.png IMG_7898.png

Movement has no markings but has a very interesting style of escapement that I have not encountered before. Anyone know more about this escapement and how to properly set the beat with it? After cleaning the clock runs twice as fast as it should.
IMG_7913.png IMG_7899.png IMG_7902.png IMG_7910.png

If you have any idea as to the maker of this clock or otherwise, please let me know!

Thanks,
~Chris
 
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rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Nov 26, 2009
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I recently got this clock from someone who wanted it cleaned and running again who had never seen it run in the many years she had it. It's about 20 inches tall and has mother of pearl inlay with floral and gold painting. On the back of the dial there is writing indicating it was cleaned in 1867 and again in 1874. On the back where the movement is mounted there is more writing indicating a cleaning in 1850 and an address in Boston, MA. Sorry about the sideways images, I can't seem to get it to rotate.
View attachment 659619 View attachment 659614

Movement has no markings but has a very interesting style of escapement that I have not encountered before. Anyone know more about this escapement and how to properly set the beat with it? After cleaning the clock runs twice as fast as it should.
View attachment 659618 View attachment 659615 View attachment 659616 View attachment 659617

If you have any idea as to the maker of this clock or otherwise, please let me know!

Thanks,
~Chris
You have a wonderful example of a papier mache painted and MOP inlaid decorated cased clock by the Litchfield Mfg. Co of CT. It has a marine movement of their making with a Sully-type escapement. They also supplied cases to other makers, including Jerome and Forestville.

See this thread for postings about these clocks and the movements with relevant links:

Marine clocks | NAWCC Forums

RM
 

Jim DuBois

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Jun 14, 2008
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There are a fair number of these clocks we have seen over the years that have no name on them, in them, or on the movement. The movement has definitely Litchfield connection, I have had one or two that were stamped "Litchfield". Most of these seem to have time only movements, or so it seems. The movement escapement is sometimes called a chopper escapement. It should respond well to correct rebushing work, good treatment of the pivots, and care given to the escapement itself. If running very fast then there is a good possibility that the balance spring is over lapped, or the cones on the ends of the balance staff worn, or the cups that retain the balance staff may be worn.

From Ken Roberts on Joseph Ives he says a bit about the Litchfield company.

The Litchfield Manufacturing Co. offered a line of cases made from papier-mache.
These were japanned, decoratively painted with various designs and stencils, and frequently
inlaid with pieces of seashells or ornamented with mother-of-pearl. Imitation designs of such
cases soon appeared in which the clock case was made of a thin section of cast iron. At the 1853
World's Fair in New York, the Ansonia Clock Co. exhibited such cases identified as "iron
papier-mache. "

The 1852 Jerome & Co. sales catalog for the firm's Philadelphia representatives provides
excellent illustrations of many of these new case designs and informative descriptions of
competition at the time. Plate I shows the Introduction to this catalog and also pages 6 and 8.
These latter two pages illustrate the "drop-octagon," pendulum movement clock. 8 Some of the
cases of the Octagon Eight-Day seen on page 6 of this catalog were furnished with fusee
movements similar to the type illustrated in Fig. 149. Plate II presents pages 15 - 18 from this·
Jerome Catalogue. Various detached lever timepieces are shown on these pages. The Tom
Thumb, Jr., with a metal case, pearl inlaid was only eight inches in height.
The Gilt Top and Column, shown on the same page, was a weight-operated clock with roller
pinions, and was undoubtedly made by the Birge, Peck and Co. in Bristol. The other small
pendulum timepiece, ten and a half inches high, was made by Silas B. Terry, then operating in
Terryville.
MATHEWS &JEWELL 1851-1853 produced MARINE MOVEMENTS FOR LITCHFIELD
Mathews & Jewell were in business at Bristol 1851-1853, consisting of the
partnership of David Mathews, Lyman Jewell and Samuel Botsford. Their factory
was on Union Street at the South Village. Movements were made for the Litchfield
Manufacturing Co. and others, including E.O. Goodwin at Bristol.
 

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