Help Identifying Hamburg American Clock Case

Johnretired

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Oct 12, 2020
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I inherited a wall clock that appears to be a Hamburg American model as the movement bears the HAC trademark (photo) with "42" above it. However, it's unclear to me whether the case is HAC or some other manufacturer. There is no label on the case; there are some handwritten numerals on the case back but think those are of little relevance. There is a small embossed plate (photo) below the pendulum.

- the embossed plate has an upward pointing arrow between the numerals; maybe consistent with arrow use in trademark?

- is "42" the movement model number? I cannot find any other numbers on the front or back plate.

- the suspension arm bears the initials D.R.P.

- the dial is approximately 7" diameter.

Looking through the HAC thread, I learned these clocks types could be ordered with various tops. I'm unsure whether the horse is original as it seems a bit out of scale.

Any help in identifying this clock case and approximate age is greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

John

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new2clocks

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Apr 25, 2005
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However, it's unclear to me whether the case is HAC or some other manufacturer.
The manufacturer of the case will most likely never be known.

Most German clock makers purchased cases from independent cabinet makers. Most German clockmakers also sold "loose" movements to the trade (retailers, wholesalers, etc.), so a wholesaler or retailer would purchase these movements and case them in their own cases. And some German clockmakers also produced their own cases. And some German clockmakers did all of the above. :)

the suspension arm bears the initials D.R.P.
DRP is an abbreviation for Deutches Reich Patent, meaning that the part is patent protected under German law.

Any help in identifying this clock case and approximate age is greatly appreciated.
The clock may be listed in an HAC catalog and someone may have a copy of that catalog. If so, they may be able to provide a name for the clock.

The style of clock is a free swinger and by looks I would estimate anywhere between 1895 to 1910 or so based on style and the period that free swingers were popular. HAC did not leave many clues to help date their clocks.

Regards.
 

Johnretired

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Thanks much for the reply and information. Do you know if the embossed plate serves some purpose or just an embellishment? I've noticed similar plates on other clocks as well (II I I II).
 

JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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Do you know if the embossed plate serves some purpose or just an embellishment? I've noticed similar plates on other clocks as well (II I I II).
This is called a beat plaque or beat plate. Theoretically it helps when you are setting the clock in beat, you can see when the pendulum is hanging exactly vertical.

JTD
 

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