Help Identify Seth Thomas Wall Clock

weehrs

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Dec 7, 2008
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Can anyone please tell me what model and how old this clock is?
 

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eskmill

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Aug 24, 2000
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Your photo resembles the Seth Thomas REGULATOR No. 4. They were offered for many years from about 1900 to about 1940 in both 80 and 72 beat pendulum length.

A more exact identification would require the case dimensions and a photo of the "works" with the face removed.

Missing the driving weight and pulley and the pendulum.
 

weehrs

Registered User
Dec 7, 2008
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The movement has 77D with a F under it and a ST in a diamond with a circle around it and U.S.A. I have the weight and pendulum I just kept them out so I would not break the glass. When I look at the movement it looks like a black coil spring is broken on the bottom, I've tried to show it in the picture. Could anyone tell me what the part is called and is it hard to find and fix?
 

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eskmill

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Aug 24, 2000
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That your Seth Thomas wall clock has the 77 movement is strongly suggestive of REGULATOR No. 4. It was offered with either 80 or 72 beat pendulum, the 72 beat being slightly longer than the 80 beat pendulum.

The broken spring is the pendulum suspension spring. Replacements are readily available from clock parts suppliers at minimal cost and are easily replaced, being held in the split stud with a pin. It's a common part used in the ST #2, 4 and many similar clock movements that have a reasonably massive pendulum bob.

The "green goo or verdigis" on various parts of the movement reveals a nice clock movement in serious need of cleaning. The green crud is the result of "rancid" oil lubricant that has become acidic enough to combine with the copper component of the brass alloy giving the slime a green hue. Probably an oil containing vegetable or animal fats was blended with petroleum based lubricant to minimize spreading. Too, it is obvious that the oil spread where it isn't needed or desired. Only the pivots or ends of the shafts should have only a miniscule amount of lubricant and never on gear or pinion teeth.

Fortunately, the No. 77 similar time-only-weight driven simple movements are easy to clean and maintain by a qualified clock repairer.
 

weehrs

Registered User
Dec 7, 2008
12
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Thank you very much for the information.
 

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