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help identify movement maker?

bruce linde

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this movement is in an edward gaskin tall case clock, made in dublin in 1840-ish... so why does it have 'H•P' and 'H' stamped in the front of the movement?

anyone seen this mark before? anything about the movement look familiar to a particular maker?

thanks,
smike


02_movement_front.jpg


etched.jpg


stamped.jpg

10_movement_a.jpg

11_movement_b.jpg

13_movement_and_bell_2.jpg

13_movement_and_bell.jpg

14_movement_c.jpg

15_movement_d.jpg

15_movement_e.jpg

02_movement_front.jpg 10_movement_a.jpg 11_movement_b.jpg 13_movement_and_bell_2.jpg 13_movement_and_bell.jpg 14_movement_c.jpg 15_movement_d.jpg 15_movement_e.jpg etched.jpg stamped.jpg
 
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harold bain

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Never seen a British tall clock with initials stamped in the movement like that smike. These movements were purchased as rough movement kits from foundries, and finished by the makers. It would have taken a fair bit of skill to put the kit together and turn it into a working movement.
 

bruce linde

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Never seen a British tall clock with initials stamped in the movement like that smike. These movements were purchased as rough movement kits from foundries, and finished by the makers. It would have taken a fair bit of skill to put the kit together and turn it into a working movement.

harold -

not sure those dubliners would appreciate you calling them brits! :cool:

dublin, 1840-ish. if it took a fair bit of work to pull the movement together someone definitely did so... it has a lot of nice little touches.

smike
 

novicetimekeeper

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harold -

not sure those dubliners would appreciate you calling them brits! :cool:

dublin, 1840-ish. if it took a fair bit of work to pull the movement together someone definitely did so... it has a lot of nice little touches.

smike

Ireland was British at the time, and is still part of the British Isles, which is a geographical rather than political description but yes, it is probably not going to be popular.

In the 19th century the names on the dial are increasingly the retailers rather than the makers, not so much the case in the 18th century when although parts would be bought in the chap on the dial was very much a clockmaker. (or often a metalsmith with a variety of trades)

You do see a few of these movements named in the 19th century but not many. That could help you, though, as that might mean somebody knows who did mark their movements.
 

bruce linde

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Ireland was British at the time, and is still part of the British Isles, which is a geographical rather than political description but yes, it is probably not going to be popular..

yes. i knew that. brain cramp. sigh...
 

novicetimekeeper

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oh, just about every five minutes! :cool:
I did that with my first one for a long time, just staring at the dial, It is in the hall so I walk past it all the time. Even now I have a house full of them I look on that one as an old friend. You probably realise by now that I'm not a huge fan of painted dial clocks but I think you have a really good looking one there, understated and elegant, it is a great clock.

I hope someone can shed further light on the movement maker for you.
 

novicetimekeeper

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Many movements were marked. John Robey did an article on them, relative to English movements supplied to American makers. He has a number of images with marked movements.

The article:

http://www.nawcc.org/images/stories/2000/articles/2004/349/349_147.pdf


Here's a couple of images of a Joseph Eberman , Lancaster, Pa Dial and it's movement.

271916.jpg 271917.jpg 271918.jpg

Ralph 271919.jpg

With thousands of makers, tens of thousands of clocks, none of us has much chance of seeing a very high proportion of them. I've only looked at a few hundred myself and I can only recall two that had makers marks on the movements. It certainly wasn't a usual thing.

Mind you, my interest is in early longcase, and obviously the later mass production that occurred in the middle of the 19th century is a different thing, when movements were sold on their own without a dial. Also I don't look at clocks that were imported to the US. However when you look at the watches that were made in the UK they weren't signed by their makers either, so it seems to be a trend that was well established.

Hopefully you will be able to tell us whose initials these are.