• The online Bulletins and Mart and Highlights are currently unavailable due to a failure of a network piece of equipment. We are working to replace it and have the Online publications available as soon as possible. Thank you for your patience.

Help - Identify German Tambour clock

keef74

Registered User
Dec 2, 2011
110
0
0
Australia
Country
Region
Hi everyone,

I was hoping someone could help identify this clock

Its a german Tambour clock no makers mark or information.
Just has made in germany on dial.

Id like to know appox age of the clock and any information thanks ...
 

Attachments

chimeclockfan

NAWCC Member
Dec 21, 2006
4,699
545
113
WI
Country
Region
We'll need a picture of the movement. Some had traits only a few makers used, despite not being signed.
 

soaringjoy

Registered User
Feb 12, 2009
7,238
37
0
Germany, North Rhine-Westphalia
Country
Region
Keef,
as CCF already stated, we will need acouple of good pics
of the movement.
These styles were made from about mid 1920s to mid 1950s
at least.
Is there a tapered pin holding the hands? I can't see exactly.
Jurgen
 

keef74

Registered User
Dec 2, 2011
110
0
0
Australia
Country
Region
Hi Everyone sorry for the late reply.

On the back plate all there is marked -

12cm
19066

No makers mark etc. The face has stamped Germany on it.
 

Kevin W.

NAWCC Member
Apr 11, 2002
23,275
587
113
64
Nepean, Ontario, Canada
Country
Region
As said pictures are needed to help identify what you have.
 

harold bain

NAWCC Member
Deceased
Nov 4, 2002
40,853
184
63
73
Whitby, Ontario, Canada
Country
Region
Can't tell for sure who made it, but it looks to me to be from the 1920-30's.
 

Kevin W.

NAWCC Member
Apr 11, 2002
23,275
587
113
64
Nepean, Ontario, Canada
Country
Region
I think its a fair bit older than the 1960,s.
 

keef74

Registered User
Dec 2, 2011
110
0
0
Australia
Country
Region
Hi everyone. I personally think its older than 1950.

If the clock was made during 1950's - 1970s the face/movement would state "west Germany" as origin not "Germany" as that country was split during that period.
Another clue is the use of brass flat nuts to secure the movement in the case.
Not Philips head style screws or later metal style screws.
The bezel is also brass. And was very green almost black when I received the clock from a friend.

I have seen with some clocks foreign stamped on the face and or movement.The clock was not stamped "foreign" as some clocks made Post WW2 - because of anti war sentiment towards Germany.

My guess is 1930s. Its not from the 60s. The style is tambour not a Deco looking piece.

Thanks everyone for the input, Its no a present for my mother who is 65 she loves the piece. It was heading for the rubbish bin (previous owner said it was old junk) and I had to clean the movement/re-stain the case/re set the beat.


Thanks !!
-> posts merged by system <-
I'm going with 1966.

Willie X
Hi Wilie, maybe 19066 is the serial/model number/product or part number of the back plate. Its all a bit of a mystery, All I know its German and its very well engineered. Cheers ..
-> posts merged by system <-
Keef,
as CCF already stated, we will need acouple of good pics
of the movement.
These styles were made from about mid 1920s to mid 1950s
at least.
Is there a tapered pin holding the hands? I can't see exactly.
Jurgen
The hands are metal the pin is not tapered. I would assume 1930s late 20s. As I know Deco was coming in very popular at that period and clock cases would reflect that style, where as this is a more traditional tambour very basic/comman house hold mantle. My grandma who is 85 said that these clocks cost a small fortune when she was a child, most families could only afford the one. Because they were left on fireplace mantles she said, the cases and the movements have been exposed to some torture over the years. Cheers
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
15,013
1,871
113
If the clock was made during 1950's - 1970s the face/movement would state "west Germany" as origin not "Germany" as that country was split during that period.
Not necessarily, something that is not there is not a good indicator of age.

The white dial with open center is common for a post WWII clock and to me the general look of your clock is post WWII. So, I zeroed in on the last two digits in the serial number and guessed 1966.

Yes you have a mystery clock there. Everyone wants to know exactly what they have but quite often you have to be patient and let the mystery unfold.

If this is a 'family' clock, then the family might be your best source of good information about when and where it was purchased. Your mother was born in 46, she would have been 20 in 1966. So it should be easy for she, sisters, brothers, cousins, to know something about the clock IF it was made in 1966.

A pre WWII clock would likely be pre 1936. This would go back more than another generation and make the job of finding 'family' information much more difficult, or imposable.

A good close up picture of the front and back of the movement might be your best bet to tighten the date of manufacturer.

Willie X
 

keef74

Registered User
Dec 2, 2011
110
0
0
Australia
Country
Region
The clock was given to me by a friend. It has not been in our family.

From what I can take from German History From 1938 - 1947 Germany was very influenced to mass produce machines/equipment for the war effort

Post 1948 Germany was two separate countries - If the clock was made late 1940s onwards it would of been printed West Germany/East Germany on the dial. As during 1948 - 1989 there was no such country called Germany.
I have seen allot of clocks with West Germany as the origin of manufacture.
The clock is too old for something made in 1989 when Germany was unified.
If the movement was 1966 it would be West German.

Source - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_German_history

The number 19066 is not the patent for the clock - US Patent: 19,066 - Method of connecting the beveling-knives in circular-cutting barrel-head machinery

Source - http://www.datamp.org/patents/displayPatent.php?pn=19066&id=1314


There isn't many clues with this one, maybe there isn't really much more to add. Thanks everyone for your feedback.
 

harold bain

NAWCC Member
Deceased
Nov 4, 2002
40,853
184
63
73
Whitby, Ontario, Canada
Country
Region
The minute hand being pinned, rather than held with a nut, is a pretty good sign of an early clock. I have a Mauthe dated to 1934 with a somewhat similar dial. Note the tambour shape had evolved to a more full figure clock by then.
It was not compulsory for clock companies to use "Made In West Germany" on their clocks. Many from this period just had "Made in Germany".
But, I'll stick with 1920's to 30's on this one.
 

Attachments

chimeclockfan

NAWCC Member
Dec 21, 2006
4,699
545
113
WI
Country
Region
The minute hand being pinned, rather than held with a nut, is a pretty good sign of an early clock. I have a Mauthe dated to 1934 with a somewhat similar dial. Note the tambour shape had evolved to a more full figure clock by then.
It was not compulsory for clock companies to use "Made In West Germany" on their clocks. Many from this period just had "Made in Germany".
But, I'll stick with 1920's to 30's on this one.
My Haller uses a nut to keep the hands on, and it is a 1920's clock.

By the 1930's the classic "Napoleon Hat" case was generally superseded by either clocks like you show, or drum headed Art Deco tambours. There are exceptions, of course. :)
 

keef74

Registered User
Dec 2, 2011
110
0
0
Australia
Country
Region
Could be a Tambour revival style ? The trouble with dating items to a period is the styles overlap, and there was revival styles during say the Art Deco period.
Different areas/regions demanded different styles traditional or a more modern look. Its a tough one ! :eek:

At the end of the day Its a nice old clock, It runs well and looks good.
I really appreciate everyone s feedback :Party:
-> posts merged by system <-
The minute hand being pinned, rather than held with a nut, is a pretty good sign of an early clock. I have a Mauthe dated to 1934 with a somewhat similar dial. Note the tambour shape had evolved to a more full figure clock by then.
It was not compulsory for clock companies to use "Made In West Germany" on their clocks. Many from this period just had "Made in Germany".
But, I'll stick with 1920's to 30's on this one.
Very similar dials on your clock you have shown.
The problem is that a case style does not always reflect the correct time period.
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
15,013
1,871
113
The problem is that a case style does not always reflect the correct time period.
Yes we know ... ;)

Harold's just pre WWII Mauthe would look almost exactly like a just post WWII Mauthe, even though separated by about 16 years or more.

Again, good close-up photos of movement, front and back, and talk to the "previous owner", if possible.

Need more information and less supposition.

Willie X
 

soaringjoy

Registered User
Feb 12, 2009
7,238
37
0
Germany, North Rhine-Westphalia
Country
Region
May I once more quote D.K. Stevenson in his Clocks Magazine
article from Nov. 2009 "Made where, When?"

"The belief is widespread, that Germany or Made in Germany
are only found on clocks made before the end of WW 2 and after
German reunification."

May I also add, that this misbelief is especially widespread on the
internet.

In general, the style of the first tambour clock shown was almost
obsolete by the mid 1930s.
The use of hand nuts instead of tapered pins was introduced in the
early 1930s by most of the major German makers.
Also by the 1930s, silvered dials were slowly yielding to the favoring
of chapter rings, with arabian numerals.
These chapter rings evolved again strongly in the early 1950s and often
sported roman numerals by the mid 1950s.
Not to forget the exceptions to the rule.

Alas, these are nothing more than clues and hints, lacking a full range
of all catalogues from all makers, in order to ID the clock most definately.
There were several hundreds of "look-alike" models over the years and one
can't have all the luck all the time. :(

Jurgen
 

Forum statistics

Threads
168,903
Messages
1,473,860
Members
48,649
Latest member
steveal
Encyclopedia Pages
1,060
Total wiki contributions
2,955
Last update
-