Help For Bent Pivot

Petec

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Is there anything I can do about the end of this shaft that won't destroy it?

IMG_20210323_154004.jpg
 

Willie X

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You may be able to carefully straighten it. Look up "straightening pivots". If it breaks off, you can send it out and get it re-pivoted. Willie X
 

bruce linde

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I change the name of the thread to be more accurate… That’s a pretty extreme band, I think you would be fortunate if it doesn’t break off. If you look through this forum you’ll find the number of current recommendations to people who can replace pivots.

and, , if it does break off make sure you save the piece and send that along with the gear for repair
 

Tim Orr

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Good afternoon, all!

Willie: What do you think? Would it make sense to try to anneal what is left of the pivot and arbor before trying to straighten? Might be that it's already pretty soft, if it got bent that much and didn't break?

Best regards!

Tim Orr
 

Willie X

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Tim,

I probably wouldn't heat it. I'm thinking the outcome is going to be the same either way.

If you do heat it, I would put the heat on the shaft. When the shaft and pivot go to barely dull red (in a darkened room), remove the heat and quickly work it hot. This operation will require removing the wheel/pinion assembly, which may become more of a problem than the pivot!

Willie X
 

wow

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Sometimes a hollow punch that fits the pivot tightly will work. It’s bent pretty bad and may break, but that arbor looks fairly large and should be easy to re-pivot. What movement is it out of?
 

Petec

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I change the name of the thread to be more accurate…
Thanks, I didn't know it was called a pivot so I was searching all over using "shaft". I have now reviewed 3 threads about bent pivots and someone re -titled this one, Thanks.
Many people have used many techniques. And the ones in this thread all sound feasible.

Many times I have needed to bend or flatten a piece of metal and I always got it red hot and bent of hammered the part. But never anything this small.

If you do heat it, I would put the heat on the shaft. When the shaft and pivot go to barely dull red (in a darkened room), remove the heat and quickly work it hot. This operation will require removing the wheel/pinion assembly, which may become more of a problem than the pivot!

Willie X
Willie,
You say remove the wheel and pinion. I can see why that would be a big problem. What would be the problem with them getting some heat...I'm not challenging, I'm just trying to understand? Do you thnk I could rig up some kind of heat shield or heat sink to keep the heat from reaching those parts?

Pete
 

Willie X

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Well, pinion caps are made of "half hard" brass and they are lightly pressed on the shaft. When you heat the cap to a dull red it will be annealed, or relaxed. Relaxing the cap will likely make it loosen on the shaft, if not now probably later.
A heat sink would probably be counter productive, as you would then need way more heat to get the area of the bend up to temp. It's a good chance (using a common torch) you would overheat the pivot and either melt it or produce a lot of oxidation.
So, for me, it would be much better to simply remove the pinion and wheel, do the deed, score the shaft a bit and press it back together.
For an amateur, back to post #2 and #3. Don't take a chance on creating a second (more serious) problem. Heck, a broken pivot isn't such a big problem anyway. Willie X
 
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kdf

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Look under the 5x or 10x magnification. If there are some tiny cracks on bent part of pivot, it probably will brake, heat will not help...
 

shutterbug

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That pivot was not hardened (or it would have broke), so I wouldn't heat it. Try straightening it with a hollow punch, and prepare yourself mentally for having to send it out for re-pivoting. If it breaks, you can have a local machinist re-pivot it, or send it out to a clock pro. My go-to guy is David LaBounty. You can call him to get a quote.
 

Petec

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Finally! I went through more trouble then it is worth to get this pic. I must have taken 50 snaps with two different programs.
Anyway, any opinions on the odds of this surviving a straightening?
Of course as shutterbug points out, "if it breaks, re-pivot it".
I don't have a hollow punch. I was thinking I would grind the end off a 16 penny nail and drill the right size hole in the end.

What is the possibility of just using the hole it came out of to straighten it? 2021-03-25-13-4249417.jpg
 

RJSoftware

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Nah, just any pair of pliers and steady hands. I use to try elaborate methods, torching while spinning in lathed, push with soft wood. None of that worked for me. All the survivors I used needle nose pliers perpendicular and more towards tip away from base. Do a bunch of small tweaks.

Now, you can repivot without a lathe, look up magic center finder. Once you understand that then realize you can chuck other end in drill and drill the hole holding drill bit by fingers.

The trick is that when you spin the object to be drilled, you can hold a drill bit reasonably in line. The spinning object forces drill bit to center itself, given you create a dimple with magic center finder to guide the drill bit on the initial start.

Also you might consider either hss drill bits or carbide. Carbide cut easier but are brittle and can break off inside if you are not carefull. Hss (high speed steel) are less brittle but easily dull. Turning slow helps in either.

You can make your own magic center finder. Find a drill bit same diameter as your gears arbor. Then find a drill bit about your pivot diameter. Find any convenient chunk of brass or aluminum. Drill hole all way through with pivot sized bit, the drill same spot with thicker arbor sized bit half way through, let the small hole guide larger drill bit, shooting for center. You can do it all by hand drill but drill press would help. Now you have magic center findrr.

So, with other end of gear chucked in drill bit, file broken pivot remnant flat. Place mcf on arbor using wider hole. Spin the drill and insert pivot sized bit. Make a dimple. Remove the mcf and continue holding drill bit by fingers.

I thin k the rule is to drill 3 or 5 times deep as diameter. Epoxy is acceptable.
 

RJSoftware

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I do watch pivots on rare occasion, same rules apply. This tool I made employs mcf principles. The larger wood wheel drives smaller that has a pin sticking out to drive a dog attached to watch gear arbor or directly contacts gear. One picture shows how carbide bit inserts through mcf on right. That carbide bit has brown plastic collar. The tool uses turn by centers which promotes greatest accuracy.

View attachment 461383

View attachment 461392

View attachment 461381

View attachment 461390

View attachment 461387
 
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Willie X

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Don't use the clock plate, unless you can find a (non) pivot hole somewhere. The hole in a 16d nail would probably work but it would be better (and easier) to just drill a 1/16" hole in any kind of metal block. A clock anvil is made for this job and a pin vise ain't bad either.
Your bent pivot is also worn and that's where it bent, (nice photo). You would probably be better off to just send it off for a re-pivot. This would eliminate the chance of a catistropic failure when/if this damaged pivot fails. Willie X
 

Petec

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[snip]
clock anvil is made for this job and a pin vise ain't bad either.
[snip]
You would probably be better off to just send it off for a re-pivot. This would eliminate the chance of a catastrophic failure when/if this damaged pivot fails. Willie X
I think I'll do the pin vice method (which means I'm ignoring your "just send it off" advice).
If anybody hears me scream you know I'm regretting that decision.
 

shutterbug

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Do some practice on something else first. It's not as easy as it may sound.
 

RJSoftware

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Practice grabbing center with a graver by hand or even a drill bit. You can cut head off a nail, file/grind it flat, chuck it in a drill and practice catching center. Use carbide cause it cuts through steel like butter.

You can tell when you got center as it stops wobbling. Do it free hand. Push at various angles to test your skill.

When your turning, the perfect speed creates long strings of thin curly wire like fine hair. Beginners go way to fast. Go real slow and gradually go faster. The expression is feed and speed. The perfect cut is attained by correct pressure (feed, amount of surface presented to blade) and speed (the rotation and cutting time efficiency agreement). But it still works even if not perfect. So dont except curlies always.

Once you master catching center you can easily build the tool I posted above and/or repivot clock gears. To build the tool I relied on common hardware stock like 1/4 inch brass rods which have reliable manufacture accuracy as did the1/4 inch drill bit had to drill straight hole through the aluminum stock. So thing fit perfectly and maintained centers. That and the super cheap available micro carbide bits for pc boards have 1/4 inch dremel sized shanks that slide perfectly center in the tool. A win-win-win match for accuracy.
 

R. Croswell

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That pivot is probably going to need to be "cleaned up" after it is straightened anyway, so chuck the pivot in a lathe (if you have one) and carefully apply pressure to the arbor until the opposite pivot lines up with the center point in the tail stock. If no lathe, chuck it is a hand drill and straighten until it appears to run true when the drill is turning. As for odds, I give it 50/50. It should take a reasonable amount of force to bend the pivot but if at any time the force required to bend it should suddenly become less, the pivot is developing a stress crack and should not be used.

RC
 

RJSoftware

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Well no, maybe both wrong. The hole size remains same, but whatever dremel size is, have it in my head as 1/4, but yes maybe 1/8. Then 1/8th rod slides inside 1/8 hole drilled through aluminium stock which serves as the lathe bed. The brass rod is runners. A small concave cone is formed on runner end to hold other pivot. The business end contains the magic center finder. It's a smaller lengthwise section of same diameter brass rod (1/8 ?) which has a smaller pivot sized hole drilled through. It also is convex coned to guide maintain center of arbor to be drilled. The mcf is made shorter length so that drill bit can reach. The toothpicks hold the mcf and runner stationary. The dog turns the arbor and the bit stays stationary.

Why I bother to explain this is because many feel the only way they can do this is by investing in watchmaker lathe. Few know that they can make their own turn by centers lathe.

This is even better than buying an old turns as taking advantage of modern standards which gives access to dremel drill bits with standard 1/8th inch bits (especially carbide), and standard 1/8th inch brass or steel rod makes for more convenient use.

This I found out the hard way. Old tools designed for this purpose lead to using Mascot pivot drill bits to drill. Even small clock arbors was a serious waste of time. Old technology too difficult, tiny shafted, scarce, etc..

There is very little that cant be done on a turns that a collet based lathe can do. Just different arrangement some including wax chuck.

Even more surprising is turn by centers based lathe has greater accuracy than collet. But a collet is easier.

You'll find this out if you ever turn any serious small stuff under the microscope. When you remove something you turned from the collets grip and then re-insert, you will find it difficult to re-establish center. Microscopic differences magnify when center is lost.

Turning by center establishes center by spinning the object between two points of cones. Center is always established. No matter how many times insert/removed. This is better arrangement for more precise measurements.

You can even make modern turn by centers base with wood. Why not? All required is enough strength for runners to slide reliably.

On a standard watchmaker lathe an easy way to make mcf it to put a flag in tool post and drill hole in flag to make mcf.
 
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svenedin

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Fascinating but I do wonder whether the OP will actually attempt to straighten this pivot or maybe the thread will still be going in two years......
 
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Petec

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Fascinating but I do wonder whether the OP will actually attempt to straighten this pivot or maybe the thread will still be going in two years......
I (the OP) also ask this question. A few other higher priority things "popped up". Last week, to prepare for summer I opened the valve that supplies water to the faucet outside the garage. It was closed and drained for the winter. A while later smoke alarms began going off. This house has about 10 smoke alarms netted together so I'm running around looking for one blinking red. I finally remember there is one in the garage. Yep, there is water pouring out of it and the seams in the ceiling board are very visible because they are drenched. It seems the previous owner decided to add the line by taping into the upstairs bathroom water line and running 1/2 PVC across 40' of crawlspace above the house and garage. The PVC was just laying across the ceiling joists. Apparently there was a low spot that didn't drain last fall so it froze and cracked the pipe.

Then you might have heard about the flooding around Nashville. I had no problem but Saturday night (two days ago) my son called to say he had 2' of water in the crawl space below his house and more coming. So yesterday was spent installing a pump and drying out the HVAC unit. More of the same today.

I hope it isn't 2 years until I can get back to this. I sure miss the chime going off every 1/2 hour.
 

RJSoftware

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Ooof, I know that's a mess. Have an X mother-in-law 's house I lived at a short while (long story) but her upstairs tub leaked. Took forever to find leak cause it was intermittent. Turns out it was the tub overflow connection loose. All that ceiling drywall repair, texture and painted. The mother-in-law complained the whole time was eye opener.

As to the vids, nah, I can take progression pics. It's the extra energy and/or expense. I got the micro pc camera but that doesn't work hands free or adapt to my binocular microscope on my lathe. For that you need the special eye piece that has digital output to monitor or similar, otherwise how you going to view and turn same time? You wind up with some system where you turn your head without eyes to hands. I supposed I'd get use to it. But that's micro view, macro (regular vid) would need whole other setup.

It's the energy thing. I got tons of unfinished projects. Watch and clock repair has become more of a "in the mood" thing. I got people who peck at me to get their projects done. They spice the deal with warm conversation, coffee and donuts even after I have openly declared "no more"...
 

Petec

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Well, it didn't survive. I couldn't even feel it move before I heard "click". The two pieces "stayed together" but the slightest pressure and it would bend back.

So I think I will try the repair. I will try some practice runs, perhaps with similar diameter nails or something.

What do I use for pivot material? The pivot piece seems to measure 0.04 inches in diameter while the arbor measures 0.074 inches.
 

Willie X

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Yep, as already mentioned, starting clock repair with a re-pivot is not recommended by me ... especially with highly capable people ready to do this work for a reasonable price.
Just wondering how that pivot got bent like that. I would guess that someone parted the plates with the springs wound up? :( Willie X
 

Petec

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[snip]
Just wondering how that pivot got bent like that. I would guess that someone parted the plates with the springs wound up? :( Willie X
Yeah, some idiot.....the idiot was me. You are going to force me to fess up aren't you.

I put cable clamps around both springs and released the pressure (I thought) on both. The time spring still had some tension I guess. Anyway, when things popped I heard something hit the cabinet next to me and saw this piece with the bent pivot on my workbench. It took me three days to find the other part. See the pics.
dsc_0203Small.jpg
dsc_0204Small.jpg
I plan on repairing that part just like I did back in 1974. See second pic.
IMG_20210330_153615.jpg

This clock was a wedding present to my grandparents back in 1911. My mother said it was always in use until one day it stopped. Unfortunately my grandfather was a very rich man until the market crashed in 1929. Then he was broke and wouldn't pay to repair the clock so it was moved to a spare bedroom in my grand parent's house. As kids we would wind up the chime spring (the time spring was what broke) and move the hands around and around to hear it chime.

When I was a teenager I thought maybe I could fix it so I just took it to my parents house. I saw that the main spring was broken right at the innermost point. I didn't have the skills to do anything about it so there it sat.

Then as an adult in 1974 I thought I would take another shot at it. I found that:

(1) The time mainspring was broken.
(2) The metal strip that suspended the pendulum was broken
(3) A number of gears had the teeth broken off. In perhaps three or four places.
(4) The nut for the hands was missing.
(5) The case was totally encased in cigar smoke residue.
(6) Some of the gold paint in the scroll work was missing.

This was before the internet so I didn't know I could buy mainsprings. I worked with a bunch of guys that knew a lot about metal work so they gave me a lot of great advice. I managed to soften the mainspring and pull out enough that I could drill a new hole in it. I resembled the mainspring assembly.

Another friend gave me a strip of steel and I soldered it in place of the broken pendulum piece.

For the broken gear teeth I soldered pieces of brass shim stock to each side and filled in the space between with solder. Then I filed in new teeth.

I made a new nut from a piece of brass.

I couldn't find anything to cut through the cigar smoke until I tried Turtle Wax. That brought out a beautiful shine.

The guys told me the best way to restore the gold paint was to use Bronzing Powder and it worked great.

I reassembled the clock and found it would run for a few days then stop. After I don't know how many hours I borrowed a dial feeler gauge and discovered that an arbor was bent and would bind up. A few taps to straighten it and I was off and running. This story must have you guys cringing.

But this clock has been running continuously since 1974. I did have to replace a mainspring or two along the way and do some amateurish oiling. But it kept running.

For the last year or so it wouldn't keep steady time. I would wind it on Sunday and set it 3 minute behind. By Wednesday it was 3 minutes ahead, then by Sunday it was 6 minutes behind. About a year ago a friend gave me two new mainsprings. I had some time now so I thought it was time for a good cleaning and new mainsprings. Then the idiot in me came out.

So that's my story and I'm sticking to it.

I will see if I can re-pivot a few nails or something.

If I feel confident that I have mastered it I will try for the real thing.

But again, what do I use for the pivot?
 
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MuseChaser

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I, for one, loved the story, and really appreciate how much the clock meant to you and your family. You exemplify the old saying, "If there's a will, there's a way." You're kind of the opposite of me.. I tend to put everything off until I'm sure I've figured out the best way to do something... which means, a great deal of the time, NOTHING gets done. Compared to that, your attitude and approach is much better. Sure, things get damaged once in a while....but on the other hand, things get done and accomplished where stuff sits on my bench for days/weeks/months/years, waiting until I KNOW what I'm doing. That stinks. A hearty toast to you.
 
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Willie X

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Pete,

Nice story there. Confession is good for the soul and I knew what had happened anyway. :)

I've been repairing clocks since the late 1950s and as a profession since 1987. I've seen the general condition of old clock's slide down the hill quite a bit over that time. So, I made it my mission to restore 'short cut jobs' whenever and wherever I find them. I do have a big advantage in that the customer pays for this work ...

No offence but your clock is pretty far "down the hill" and if you keep patching it up, eventually it will stop for good, or throw it's guts out for the last time. That's why I was pushing you to have that pivot restored by a pro and hopefully, on any future work, try to move your clock back in the direction of good health and happiness. One step at a time can get you there eventually.

Best wishes, Willie
 
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RJSoftware

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A same movement from ebay around $30. Swapping out a few gears won't kill sentimentality, just as installing fresh tires on your favorite car.

One part that should never be replaced (in my view) is the dial. The original dial is the heart and soul of the clock. The dial is testament of the hands who used and cared for it though the years.

The patina is the recorded life force that still continues with you the descendants. The value of sentimental varies much in different families. Some have so litte. When rummaging through Goodwill seeing discarded family photo albums of weddings and child birth etc. one can wonder what brought about all to common decisions to discard the memories. Finding discarded family photo albums was quite common occurrence. Did everyone die? Divorce? Perhaps a different type of cancer deep within the blood.

Luckily the wise know the value of forgiveness, so we can keepsake family heirlooms to honour remembrance.

 
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R. Croswell

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While almost anything can be fixed, in this case, it looks like you have an old Ansonia movement that's pretty beaten up. You might be able to find another old Ansonia movement on ebay.com for just a few bucks to harvest the parts you need. If the pivot was the only thing wrong I would say perhaps try your hand at repivoting, but this one has a bunch of trashed wheels as well.You can't get any closer to original than a part from the same make and model.

RC
 

MuseChaser

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I do watch pivots on rare occasion, same rules apply. This tool I made employs mcf principles. The larger wood wheel drives smaller that has a pin sticking out to drive a dog attached to watch gear arbor or directly contacts gear. One picture shows how carbide bit inserts through mcf on right. That carbide bit has brown plastic collar. The tool uses turn by centers which promotes greatest accuracy.

View attachment 461383

View attachment 461392

View attachment 461381

View attachment 461390

View attachment 461387
I am VERY intrigued with this... but don't understand the concept or how to use it. The belt-drive part makes sense, of course. Is there any chance you could elaborate?
 

Petec

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I, for one, loved the story, and really appreciate how much the clock meant to [snip]
MuseChaser, I am humbled by your message.

As for this pivot. I will look into a professional repair.
But this technique of repair looks like something I need to add to my skills. I have a drill press for my Dremel tool that I used to drill holes in PC boards with carbide bits. I guess I'm embedded. I will see if I can master it with scrap stock.
 

RJSoftware

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Normally when you spin an object, whatever yo place on it is usually forced off the edge by centrifugal force. Like a merry go round. Those who sit on the outside edge feel the greatest force. The on who sits in the center feels the least.

When you spin the object that you wish to drill a hole in and present the drill bit stationary, only applying forward pressure to drill will drift towards center or will wobble. If it wobbles you missed, too far away.

When you hit center (or close enough that the drill cut drifts to center), then the bit becomes still.

Once center is established even drilling at a slight angle (tip still in center) the bit will continue center, however, the hole will taper open wider. So if you miss with slight wobble you can still drift to center.

When people say they "catch the center", You test poke the tip looking for the still.

Sometimes when you think you got the center, but you dont, the evidence shows in the hole as a little pip, tit, dead center. A larger bit can chew past it.

Your supposed to drill perfectly center with bit perpendicular. Normally held by drill chuck on tailstock qill of a lathe.

But understand, the smaller you get the more critical the measure. You would be surprised to find that many watchmaker lathes are highly inaccurate when it comes to drilling dead center.

To give you an example, I used my Rivett watchmaker lathe to create the tiny brass magic center finders for a set of carbide pc board bits.

There was no issue with holding the 1/8th inch brass pieces in a collet. The manufactured round brass rod 1/8th inch was typically reliable and perfect. The problem was the lack of perfection of the lathe's quill. At the microscopic level the slightest runout at all would snap the tiny brittle carbide bits. Carbide has no flex.

The solution was to use small piece of neoprene to hold drill bit with and attach to quill. The hose flexed which allowed bit to find center of the spinning brass.

Understanding this you begin to see the invisible advantage of turning by centers.

I tell you quite frankly, it is like magic when you catch your first (and then on) center and the graver tip or bit goes still while it continues drilling.

Even more delightful is seeing those tiny curly string. It's amazing (no lie) when you see a string of curly hair fine as any spiders web and you'll find yourself betting to see how long you can make them grow.

Why this is significant is two fold. When you're turning with a graver or drilling, when the cut is going poorly chips/dust is produced. The edge of the blade is gouging/chipping not cutting. Correcting can be difficult. There are several factors, the sharpness of blade, the pressure and the speed of rotationcalled feed and speed. It is assumed the blade is sharp.

In the real world you cant assume the blade is sharp, the exception in general is carbide. If you ever use hss to cut with you will come to understand why people prefer carbide despite being brittle. Hss becomes dull if over heated. It can cut but you have to keep perfect feed and speed. To complicate matters the object desired to cut becomes hardened by the burnishing action of a dull hss blade, which means even if you restore/grind new edge on hss it wont cut the burnished result. This is easily solved by using carbide to cut past burnish.

When parts get real small you cant chip your way there. The object piece becomes too weak with micro fractures.

The secret is to slow down, way down. Have you ever seen a pipe threader. Rigid metal conduit is threaded with large dies. The pipe slowly turns the dies cut the thread gradually deeper as it turns. Feed and speed. Big fat curlies, same sort of thing just different proportions.
 
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RJSoftware

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View attachment 461380

This picture shows the brass magic center finders which is supposed to be one per each of the different carbide micro bits. One of the smaller bits busted though. The picture doesnt show it well but one side of each brass mcf has cone taper the holds the object spinning arbor center (the object spinning from the little wheels dog/wire) that arbor end is ground with tiny flat spot. The 1/8 bit shaft slides in aluminum lathe body and tip of bit fits snuggly in mcf hole. The mcf is perfectly aligned because its made of 1/8th round brass stock. Each mcf center hole is designated to a bit size.

The lathe was first created by drilling 1/8th inch hole all way through stock aluminum block. The bed was then cut out and the bed is one piece. This tool is a drill or a lathe. The small wheel and it's pin (aka dog) turn the piece. When used as lathe two runners are employed. The runners have inverted cones on ends to hold pivot tips. Other runners are employed for different reasons. Example a V notch runner allows pivot work. It provides a ledge for access to pivot. Similar to Jacot tool.

The tool also can be used to drive Jacot tool with
 
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shutterbug

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They also make center finding bits that will find center pretty well if you are close. They are used to establish the center hole, and then are switched out for another bit to finish the hole.
 
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RJSoftware

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Apr 15, 2005
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Let me state clearly this tool I made is no new invention, the turns has been around probably 200+ years, all I did was update mine to use modern, readily available, higher performance dremel (1/8th shaft) bits and 1/8th inch brass(or steel) runners.

I also made a cement chuck, which is basically like 3 or 4 jaw chuck or face plate, but the object is held by hot glue to the plate surface.

So basically I turned a bearing of brass and cut a groove on that bearing so the lathe's drive belt would spin it on a runner. I soldered a plate to that bearing which acts like faceplate/chuck to hold object.

I also designated a 1/8th vertical stub for initial loading/gluing. The problem was centering an object on the plate while working the hot glue. I like to use propane torch and spin to find center.

So say your trying to turn larger round object, you put pile of hot glue on faceplate(cement chuck, aka shellac chuck), set object on but then you have to center it while glue is hot.

You spin the chuck while turning and heating. While it's hot you can touch the object on perimeter, to center it.

Having a vertical stub to spin, heat and center avoids the issue of gravity when centering. Once cool it's then inserted on lathe for turning.

I don't generally use it because I have a dedicated watchmaker lathe that has 4 jaw chuck, faceplate and shellac chuck. It's just another way of expanding home made lathe capability that cost next to nothing.

The hot-glue shellac chuck, faceplate are good alternatives for the issues of microscopic centering accuracy and also beats collet's ability to re-establish center. This because the collet cant always be counted on to grip a turned object with exactly same centers. If you explore those who turn watch balance staffs you will see excellent collet held work but all done in one swoop without even flipping the stock. Also t is acceptable to flip once (turn one side, flip, then turn other side).

But hey, I have tendancy to miss the mark. And once you release that second collet grip kiss center goodbye (at least in my experience).

So, for forgoing the ease of using a collet we get the ability to remove measure and recenter.

So the good compromise is to rough out on the collet and fine tune on turns and or jacot.
 
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Petec

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Well, too put an end to this saga. I really wanted to learn to re-pivot but with all the irons I have in the fire now I realized I wouldn't have time for all the practice runs. I decided to see if a local clock repair shop would do it for me. I called a few but one said he didn't bother to do it because he knew someone that did a great job. I called the person and he said mail it to him so I did. The USPS said it would be there Saturday. I got the repaired part (see pic) on Monday. He didn't want any payment until I got the repaired part. Repaired.jpg

It turns out that it must have gotten there sooner because he mailed it back on Friday.

I don't know the terms for use of this forum.
Can I provide his contact information?
Can I say what I paid?

Thanks to all with really great ideas and methods.

Pete
 

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