Heat or not?

Discussion in 'Clock Case Restoration and Repair' started by tracerjack, Jun 1, 2019.

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  1. tracerjack

    tracerjack Registered User
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    Jun 6, 2016
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    I need to try and repair the top carving on this GB case. It seems to me it would be easier to repair the piece if I removed it from the case. It looks like hide glue was used to attach it. Heat would be the way to loosen the hide glue, but I'm afraid it might also loosen the veneer. I haven't really worked with hide glue (or veneer), other than to clean off bits from things that have already separated, so I don't know how much heat it would take to loosen this. I certainly don't want to make things worse. Any advice? On closer inspection, I not so sure it is veneer, at least not the ultra thin kind. It almost feels like it is 1/4 inch thick. Perhaps steam bent?
    DSC_1397.JPG DSC_1398.JPG
     
  2. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Would a thin razor blade work? You could even heat it and tap it, heat it and tap it until it comes loose.
     
  3. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
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    I don't think it's veneer. Look closely to see if you can find the heads of some nails. I'd try a thin knife or blade of some kind to see if it will start to loosen from the back side.
     
  4. tracerjack

    tracerjack Registered User
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    Took a half hour of pressing X-acto blades into the join, then short heating spells with a hair dryer, but it is off with both case and carving in good shape. Thanks for the tips.
     
  5. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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  6. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
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    FYI. Hide glue will fully become liquid at 140 degrees. It will soften at 90 to 100 degrees, which is enough to separate glued parts. Wood does not conduct heat very well. That charteristic will allow you to apply consentrated heat to small areas without affecting nearby areas. Apply heat up close to the parts to be seperated works quite well but you have to be careful not to apply too much heat to quickly. Time and patience to build up the heat in the target area will get the job done with out affecting close by parts or veneer. I've used this method even on small areas of veneer that were coming loose and needed to be reglued or replaced.
     

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