Haswell's "Horology" vs Goodrich's "Modern Clock"

Discussion in 'Horological Books' started by eskmill, Jan 12, 2003.

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  1. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Aug 24, 2000
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    Admittedly it's unfair to compare these two books because they originated in different eras and although both in the English language, J. Eric Haswell's is decidedly an English publication describing English clock and watches and English maintenance practices. This in addition to the fact that Goodrich's "The Modern Clock" seems to be a collection of magazine articles said to have been edited by Hazlitt and Walker, creates an "apple & oranges" comparison but the scope and depth of both are so very similar that they sit side-by-side on my bookshelf.

    That being said, I've found Haswell's "Horology - The Science of Timekeeping and the Construction of Clocks, Watches and Chronometers" to be a similarly useful text like "The Modern Clock" book but written for Englishmen about English clocks and watches.

    First published in 1928, it was reprinted in 1951 and again in 1976. The topics are generally the same as in Goodrich but more said on the science of timekeeping plus a section on marine chronometers and one on English master clocks.

    The text is augmented by many excellent illustrations and crisp line drawings; 288 pages.
    It's a valuable addition to my working library.

    Les
     
  2. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
    NAWCC Fellow NAWCC Member

    Aug 24, 2000
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    Admittedly it's unfair to compare these two books because they originated in different eras and although both in the English language, J. Eric Haswell's is decidedly an English publication describing English clock and watches and English maintenance practices. This in addition to the fact that Goodrich's "The Modern Clock" seems to be a collection of magazine articles said to have been edited by Hazlitt and Walker, creates an "apple & oranges" comparison but the scope and depth of both are so very similar that they sit side-by-side on my bookshelf.

    That being said, I've found Haswell's "Horology - The Science of Timekeeping and the Construction of Clocks, Watches and Chronometers" to be a similarly useful text like "The Modern Clock" book but written for Englishmen about English clocks and watches.

    First published in 1928, it was reprinted in 1951 and again in 1976. The topics are generally the same as in Goodrich but more said on the science of timekeeping plus a section on marine chronometers and one on English master clocks.

    The text is augmented by many excellent illustrations and crisp line drawings; 288 pages.
    It's a valuable addition to my working library.

    Les
     
  3. Charles E. Davis

    Charles E. Davis Registered User
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    Nov 6, 2000
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    Les,
    I recognized the name Hasluck and I too have two of his books. One is "The Watch Jobber's Handybook."
    It has a preface signed by P. N. Hasluck and dated 1887. The title page has the same date but lists him as Paul N. Hasluck, A.I.M.E. The book is one of a series "Handybooks for Handicrafts." The series at that time included metal and wood turning and pattern makeing. In preparation were cabinet making, model engineering, mechanic's workshop and the "Clock Jobbers Handybook."
    Hasluck also is listed as editor in a book I have entitled "Practical Graining and Marbling." It was first published in 1902. It lists Haslick as editor of "Cassell's Cyclopaedia of Mechanics."
    The letters after his name lead one to think he may have been a real person rather than a house writer like Goodrich.
    There are so many intriguing questions about the past!

    Charlie Davis, La Verne, CA
     
  4. Charles E. Davis

    Charles E. Davis Registered User
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    Les
    My face is red!!! I went back and re-read your note and realize we are talking about two different people. I think I was responding more to our conversation last night than the message you posted.
    Sorry.

    Charlie Davis, La Verne, CA
     
  5. Charles E. Davis

    Charles E. Davis Registered User
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    Coleman deals with Ward L. Goodrich's identity in his discussion of the reprinting of "The Watchmaker's Lathe" in the July 1972 issue of A H & J. I quote:
    "Originally published by Hazlitt & Walker in 1903 . . .
    ", , ,It has been pretty well established that Ward L. Goodrich was the pen name for C. E. Walker of the printing firm of Hazlitt & Walker. This lathe treatise preceeded his famous "The Modern Clock" by a couple of years.
    "We have to conclude that Mr. Walker was a writer rather than a practicing bench horologist, and that while he was quite well acquainted with bench repairing, he had to rely on research and help from others to compiles such a work."
    He goes on to tell of one error in the lathe book which deals with the so called Dale lathe.

    Charlie Davis, La Verne, CA
     
  6. Charles E. Davis

    Charles E. Davis Registered User
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    Here is what he says about Dale:
    ", , , 'The Watchmakers' Lathe' contains one gross inaccuracy, of no serious import mechanically or technically, most likely explained by the above (Coleman's view of Goodrich-Walker) and we mention it only here for its 'amusement' tinge.
    "Upon bottom of page 40 we find: 'This lathe is known as the Dale.' The fact is: there never was a Dale lathe. This bit was pointed out to this writer several years ago by the late Sam Dale, son of Stephen A. Dale, inventor of the 'Dale' collet chuck. This chuck was a breakthrough in both accuracy and retail price to become the dominant seller of the 1900's. That name 'Dale' appeared upon so many chucks that to this day I can find you oldtimers who will swear that they have seen and used a 'Dale' lathe."

    Charlie Davis, La Verne, CA
     

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