Hands turn a little tightly and more.

POWERSTROKE

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Jan 11, 2011
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I've asked this question before and there never seems to be a definitive answer on this problem. On an older her eight day Herr from the 50s the hands are off by about a minute or two when it strikes I see no way to correct that. I have adjusted the lift lever a couple times with no real solution if I tighten the inner nut it helps a little bit. That's the first problem the second thing is the hands seem a little stiff when you turn them, not super stiff but more than I personally like. I've tried new nuts doesn't really work the movements been completely overhauled. One thing that I noticed works is if you turn the outer nut upside down it seems to work properly is this a valid way to cure this problem?
P.s there is also a very thin brass washer with a square hole when I received this. What is the correct spot for it? Between the two nuts? Between the cannon and minute hand, between the hand and inner nut? It looks homemade, not sure, I've seen it once before
 
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Dells

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Oct 18, 2019
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P.s there is also a very thin brass washer with a square hole when I received this. What is the correct spot for it? Between the two nuts? Between the cannon and minute hand, between the hand and inner nut? It looks homemade, not sure, I've seen it once before
Is that not the hand tension washer if so it goes on centre arbor before cannon pinion and sits on a shoulder , I have just made one for a skeleton clock I am repairing.
Dell
A5E1EAE9-CB49-43D6-8851-658BE32B20DA.jpeg
 

svenedin

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Could we see the hands and how they are attached please? The minute hand may have an adjustable collet. If it doesn’t then you are probably stuck with the clock striking a minute or two early. If it bothers you a lot you could have a minute hand made that does have an adjustable collet.
 

Mike Phelan

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Dec 17, 2003
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PS,
I think that the oval hole and the washer with the square hole you're referring to are wrong - there shouldn't be anything between the hands and dial; - the oval hole is doing nothing. What you should have is the oval brass washer sitting on the centre arbor clear of the front plate, then the cannon pinion.

Have you got a picture of the complete front plate without the hour wheel? Is the warning lever lifted by the minute wheel as is usual?
 

Bernhard J.

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Jan 10, 2022
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P.s there is also a very thin brass washer with a square hole when I received this. What is the correct spot for it? Between the two nuts? Between the cannon and minute hand, between the hand and inner nut? It looks homemade, not sure, I've seen it once before
This brass washer with square hole fixes the minute hand to the cannon pinion. The cannon pinion has a square cross section and if you have a very close look, you will notice that near the outer end all four edges have a small notch. This allows to put the washer on the cannon pinion and to turn it by 45°, so enganging with the notches and fixing the brass washer to the cannon pinion and so the minute hand underneath the washer.

For removing the minute hand you need to grab the washer and turn it by 45°. Off it comes and the minute hand can be pulled off.

At least this is how it is intended in case of old clocks. E.g. my Knox clock has exactly this. Some botcher additionally put glue between the washer and the minute hand, for whatever reason. If there is slack with the minute hand, this should be removed otherwise.
 
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POWERSTROKE

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Jan 11, 2011
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This brass washer with square hole fixes the minute hand to the cannon pinion. The cannon pinion has a square cross section and if you have a very close look, you will notice that near the outer end all four edges have a small notch. This allows to put the washer on the cannon pinion and to turn it by 45°, so enganging with the notches and fixing the brass washer to the cannon pinion and so the minute hand underneath the washer.

For removing the minute hand you need to grab the washer and turn it by 45°. Off it comes and the minute hand can be pulled off.

At least this is how it is intended in case of old clocks. E.g. my Knox clock has exactly this. Some botcher additionally put glue between the washer and the minute hand, for whatever reason. If there is slack with the minute hand, this should be removed otherwise.
I've seen two herrs with this square metal washer, none of the others had it I've worked on.

67AF2BF6-945C-43D2-AE24-E706CE3CA0B5.jpeg CC6A5ECB-EDD1-40D9-8ABC-B6C08D62F636.jpeg
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Both hands should be tight on their respective cannons but both cannons should wiggle freely, in & out plus to & fro.
Willie X
 
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POWERSTROKE

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Jan 11, 2011
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Yes, I know. What is the brass square thin washer for and where does it go. I've only seen it twice.
 

Willie X

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Which hand square does it fit? It would probably go behind that hand. Willie X
 

Bernhard J.

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Hi Wilie,

I believe that the minute hand is originally not only held by friction on the cannon pinion, since at least larger and older clocks are usually set by turning the minute hand by hand. I have seen this kind of "locking washer" on several clocks. I do not suppose that the (small) knotches near the end of the cannon pinion and engaging with the square in the washer upon turning are purposeless (or later additions, for whatever reason).

Best, Bernhard
 

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