Hamilton Movement Shipping Tins

Discussion in 'American Pocket Watches' started by Tref, Oct 5, 2017.

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  1. Tref

    Tref Registered User
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    So for (railroad), watches that Hamilton shipped to Canada, I believe they were shipped without cases reportedly to save duty or tariff fees. Other than that were they shipped complete?

    Also, what kind of packing material was used to protect the dials that were attached to the movements.
     
  2. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
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    The standard shipping containers contained springs and other fixtures to hold all the parts in place. I do not think it was customary to use any packing but someone will probably show up with a counter example.
     
  3. Tref

    Tref Registered User
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    I guess what I'm especially interested in is whether or not it was common practice to equip the movements with the 24-hour dials for those 992s being sent to Canada. If so then it would probably be safe to assume the springs and other mechanisms used to hold the movements in place would have also protected the dial from coming into contact with the container.

    It took me a couple of reads through your description to understand what you were saying. So I had to edit my initial reply.

    Thanks for the info.
     
  4. Kent

    Kent Registered User
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    Peter Kushnir, a CPR Time Service official once described to me Hamilton 992B grade watches arriving in shipping boxes from Hamilton with the movements and cases (equal amounts of both) being packaged separately and the whole package being labeled "Watch Parts". This was done because the import duties were less for parts than for complete watches.

    Terry Hall once showed me a picture of a Hamilton shipping tin, labeled for a 992B. I believe that the label listed a Canadian dial, but I can't remember and I can't find the picture. Perhaps Terry can enlighten us.
     
  5. Tref

    Tref Registered User
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    You are right Peter, there are Hamilton tins that are marked 992B as well as 992E that indicate a "24HR CP" dial on the label on the outside of the tin. And this is one of the things I'm trying to establish as being factual, that those movement shipping tins did originally contain the dial attached to the movement.

    Assuming that is so, and I have no reason to doubt it was not, the other thing I'm trying to determine is how they were secured inside the tin so as to prevent damage to the dial.
     
  6. Jim Haney

    Jim Haney Registered User
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    #6 Jim Haney, Oct 6, 2017
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2017
    s-l500.jpg

    This one went off on ebay yesterday . The way they work is that the complete movement & dial sit in the lower tin and it rests on the rim by the dial plate and when the top is locked down it touches the very edge of the dial like a bezel would and keeps anything from moving in the tin.
     
  7. Tref

    Tref Registered User
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    Hi Kent,
    I must be doing a very poor job at multi-tasking these days. Sorry for calling you Peter, and thanks for the info! <sheepish grin>
     
  8. terry hall

    terry hall Registered User
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    on the old MB i had a gallery i could pull up images from... but dont think it works now.

    I found this one that is not a 992b, and is courtesy of Larry Bucan think it is marked cp dial


    there is another i have an image of for a 992b, it says 090 dial and is not a very good image.


    got a lot on plate this weekend but will find my actual example and take a new image

    2652721 movement tin only l bucan.jpg 992b metal movement holder.jpg
     
  9. Tref

    Tref Registered User
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    090. Another 24hr dial. Thanks Terry
     
  10. terry hall

    terry hall Registered User
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    the c161xxx is the example i was speaking of that is here. I don't think i have another.
     
  11. Tref

    Tref Registered User
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    For 992B movements I would imagine that the vast majority that were shipped out in tins went to Canada.

    I don't recall when it became common for Hamilton to case their watches before they left the factory. But the practice of shipping in tins to places other than markets which included duty/tariff fees must have decreased as the years marched on toward the middle of the last century.

    I would also imagine that the larger share of the tins used most recently would indicate a 24hr dial, if in fact Canada was the destination for those railroad watches shipped out in tins.
     
  12. Tref

    Tref Registered User
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    Another observation, at least insofar as each of the examples shown in this thread shows, is that the paper label on each of the tins seems to be oriented 180 degrees out from the embossed letters on the tops of the tins, effectively making them upside down.

    Is this typical of all such tins? If so, does anyone know why they might have been applied that way?
     

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