Marine: HAMILTON 21 transport

Discussion in 'Chronometers' started by artbissell, Sep 22, 2015.

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  1. artbissell

    artbissell Registered User
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    #1 artbissell, Sep 22, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2015
    The well treated 1944 Navy 6459 has balance secured for transport both axially and radially. Instructions were only for narrow corks? Notice here corks not under spokes as diagrammed. artbissell

    IMG_3456x.jpg IMG_3484ax.jpg IMG_3444a.jpg
     
  2. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
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    Art, what is the big chunk of metal for in the bottom left of center attached to the barrel bridge?
     
  3. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

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    Tom,

    That appears o be a metal tab with a wire soldered to it. The tab is under a plate screw, and the wire goes through a vacant screw hole on the balance rim. As Art says, "secured axial lay and radially".
     
  4. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
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    With the very large corks in place, it is a bit like having a belt ans suspenders. I do not recall seeing that locking mechanism on any other Model 21.
     
  5. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

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    Tom,

    And you won't. That is something Art has put together, I'm almost certain!
     
  6. itspcb

    itspcb Registered User
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    Guys,
    When transporting the chronometer, as in using public transport, do you favour dismantling the unit from the gyro ring and filling the box with stuffing or do you believe in transporting with the unit in gimbals? My concern is the fragility of the gimbal pivots.

    Peter
     
  7. artbissell

    artbissell Registered User
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    I got it originally as is from collector of antique scientific instruments who got it from antique dealer. I suppose the broad cork surfaces alone would prevent rotation. but not if they slipped or shrunk. art
     
  8. Paul Regan

    Paul Regan Registered User

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    Peter, I always remove the "tub" from the gimbals when shipping any chronometer.
    Paul
     
  9. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
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    I agree with Paul. I never ship one in the gimbals. The U.S. Navy had special aluminum shipping containers for the Model 21 and the boxes were not necessarily kept with the chronometer they started out with.
     
  10. itspcb

    itspcb Registered User
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    Tom, I wonder if they were delivered from new in their boxes? Movements involving tubs may have been to ship items to/from repair, the tub system being a necessity to deal with the large numbers moving around at any one time.

    I bought a Russian MC that was advertised as 'in its original packaging' and so it was. The movement was removed from its gimbals and placed on a piece of 8mm rubber in the bottom of the box. A collar formed from 3 layers of rubber was wrapped around it tightly, then a board was placed on top of the movement and the gimbal ring laid upon it. The movement was wrapped in brown paper that totally disintegrated into a thousand pieces as I unwrapped it. This packing got the MC from a Baltic state to the UK in one piece that worked.
    I wonder if we could produce a 'packing sticky for MC's? Could be useful for those attempting to ship a MC for the first time. Problem is always there though, 'do you trust an auctioneer or seller to cork the movement'?
    Peter
     

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  11. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
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    If I do not think they know what they are doing but do know how to open the tub, I ask them to use pieces of paper rather than corks. They are not likely to have wedges and they may be clumsy. The paper is not as good, but it is safer and, I think, good enough.

    I really would rather the box and tub be in separate packages both placed in a larger carton. If they are separated in shipping, they may not both get to the destination.

    Chronometer stickers that can be placed inside the lid ot the box or on the bottom of the tub would be a great small project for someone. We could post the image here for printing onto self stick mailing labels.
     
  12. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

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    The U S Bureau of Ships manual on the model 21 is quite explicit that the chronometer should be run for 48 hours prior to securing the balance wheel in a neutral position using cork wedges. But in clumsy hands, cork wedges could cause damage. Folded thin cardboard wedges might be a safer alternate choice.

    "Transport" to me means the chronometer is to be shipped by a commercial carrier to another location, as opposed to transporting it by hand carrying it. The manual outlines procedures for both hand carrying a chronometer, and also surrendering it to a commercial carrier for transport.

    Procedures for hand carrying a chronometer either running, or not running, differ notably, and differ from country to country. But as to surrendering the chronometer to a commercial carrier, the manual is explicit that the chronometer should be removed from the gimbals, allowed to run 48 hours after a winding before the balance wheel is secured, then the tub with the chronometer packed separate from the case.

    If I were shipping one, I would remove all the gimbal hardware from the case, prepare the chronometer in the recommended way, then wrap the tub and pack it securely in the case with foam rubber or bubble pack. Then wrap the case in sturdy paper, enfold it in foam rubber or bubble pack, then pack it securely into a stout carton, assuring it is packed tightly enough to prevent shifting in the carton. Then to package the gimbal hardware separately, and insulate it well enough to eliminate risk of contacting anything else in the carton, then pack it all together. The carton should allow lots of room for insulating material, and packed tightly enough to eliminate risk of shifting in the carton. The carton securely wrapped, then FRAGILE labels stuck, one to each surface of the carton.
     
  13. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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    My preference is, the tub/movement removed from the gimbals and packed face down. I believe the wedges provide more protection with the movement face down.

    Ralph
     

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