• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Haller movement

MuseChaser

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Feb 5, 2019
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Just got this clock a few days ago. It arrived completely locked up.. verge wouldn't move, no chime or strikes working. Most of limited experience is with 400 and 1000 day clocks. Noticed that this Haller had a similar looking anchor and escapement depth adjustment, so I started by raising the escapement and, once the anchor was free of the escape wheel, everything started spinning freely, the chimes sounded, etc. Adjusted the escapement as best I could with the movement still mounted in the clock, but couldn't really see if the drops were even or not, but got it so it would advance one tooth at a time smoothly while operating the verge manually. The verge still felt as if it wasn't moving real freely.. more friction/resistance than I'd expect... so I pulled the movement and removed the verge/anchor and bracket. Lots of crud on the pallets, the escape wheel, the pivots, and the bushings. Also noticed some pretty obvious wear on the faces of the pallets, as you may be able to see in the closeup pic attached. I was going to file/polish them flat again, but thought I'd wait and get the opinion of you folks who know what you're doing first... so i didn't. Cleaned up that portion of the movement (too scared/inexperienced/time-crunched to take the entire movement apart at this stage of my horological development), reassembled and adjusted, and put it back in the clock. It runs and sounds GREAT!!!

Except.....

1. I have never seen a pendulum operate on such a small amplitude. This thing travels MAYBE 1/2" total from side to side. Is this normal?!?
2. A very strange problem.. this clock does not want to STOP running. It even started by itself once with the pendulum hanging and centered.. just looked at it and it started to go!! If I take the pendulum off, there's no way to stop the clock. I guess that's good... but is it normal?
3. It runs fast, and I have the pendulum at the very bottom of its adjustment. Fast, as in it gained half an hour overnight. Now what?

I've got Conover's Basic Clock Repair, Striking Clocks, and Chiming Clocks books, but don't see this "Haller" movement mentioned or pictured anywhere, although I'm green enough that I may have missed it if it's a copy of another style movement.

Any information and help would be much appreciated. It's a very interesting clock, to me anyways. Sort of looks like a standard Tambour clock, but with the two sides sawed off. Triple chime, and it sounds beautiful.. very rich full tone, with almost an underwater/vibraharp dreamlike sound. Anchor.jpg Haller complete.jpg HallerBack.jpg HallerFront.jpg HallerClock.jpg
 
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wow

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Jun 24, 2008
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Sounds like the anchor is skipping teeth on the escape wheel. Lower the anchor slightly until it locks the escape wheel. Then raise is just enough to release the escape wheel. If it still skips teeth, the anchor may need work. Polishing the anchor may have removed enough metal to change the drops.
 
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MuseChaser

NAWCC Member
Feb 5, 2019
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Thanks for the reply, Will. If it's skipping teeth, and that's entirely possible, I'm surprised it only gains at the rate it currently gains, but that's entirely based upon my experience with torsion clocks... if those skip or flutter, they tend to gain a ridiculous amount of time in a short period. I'll go back in and see if I can lower the anchor a bit without binding and report back.

Other than the "Haller AE" logo, "Foreign," "EO," "12CM" and "190.66," on the back, I can't find a date on the movement. Does anybody have any more information about the maker, approximate year, and specific movement model of this clock?
 
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MuseChaser

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Feb 5, 2019
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Will... thank you! You were absolutely correct. Lowered the anchor until it locked, then raised only as much as necessary to get the clock to run.... and it ran fine overnight and lost about seven minutes. Plenty of room to correct for that with the adjustable pendulum. You're the best!

I've attached a closeup of the stamps on the movement. After doing a bit more searching, I found an old thread on this forum about a similar clock/movement which would date this clock sometime from 1929 to early 1930s, but that movement had a serial number stamped where mine just says "Oe" and nothing after "HALLER," whereas mine says "HALLER A5" or maybe "HALLER AS".. can't tell. Also that clock was a single westminster chime whereas mine is a triple chime movement.

Haller Stamp.jpg
 
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LenzkirchFan

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Aug 31, 2002
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Give the escape wheel a good looking over. Since the anchor was pushed down onto the teeth, it may have bent only one tooth. It would be best to take it apart, clean and do a complete inspection. You can take lots of pictures as you tear it down and there are lots of Utube videos on repairing and reassembling movements and of course, there is lots of great help on this board.

Good luck!
 

wow

NAWCC Member
Jun 24, 2008
4,800
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75
Pineville, La. (central La.)
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Will... thank you! You were absolutely correct. Lowered the anchor until it locked, then raised only as much as necessary to get the clock to run.... and it ran fine overnight and lost about seven minutes. Plenty of room to correct for that with the adjustable pendulum. You're the best!

I've attached a closeup of the stamps on the movement. After doing a bit more searching, I found an old thread on this forum about a similar clock/movement which would date this clock sometime from 1929 to early 1930s, but that movement had a serial number stamped where mine just says "Oe" and nothing after "HALLER," whereas mine says "HALLER A5" or maybe "HALLER AS".. can't tell. Also that clock was a single westminster chime whereas mine is a triple chime movement.

View attachment 634739
Glad you got it going. I wish all were that easy to diagnose.
 
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