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hairspring repair

Bill B

Registered User
Aug 12, 2004
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Apache Jct AZ
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Start at the inner most coil next to collet, gently untangling it coil by coil. once you have coils separated then you can start to make each coil concentric to the next one on the way out from collet. Good luck you will need it.
 

Samantha

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Jun 28, 2009
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Central Florida
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When you start putting the coils in the flat, you will want to make your adjustments 180 degrees back toward the collet from the highest or lowest point. You should have some good hairspring skills when you're finished! :eek:
Samantha
 

Samantha

Registered User
Jun 28, 2009
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I would start by working on the round first. It will probably take several times working on the round and the flat before it is finished. Take your time, and you may have to take some breaks, instead of doing it at one sitting.
Samantha
 

Kevin W.

NAWCC Member
Apr 11, 2002
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I dont envy anyone trying to straighten this.You need mega patience and many breaks.
Good luck to you and keep us posted on your progress.
 

Don Dahlberg

Registered User
Aug 31, 2000
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First I recommend you get a copy of Henry Fried's "Bench Practices for Watch and Clockmakers" and read pages 26-43. I can't imagine explaining it in fewer pages for this kind of tangle.

The first thing to do is to get the tangle out. I use tweezers, needle and a tissuel. A tangle near the collect is best dealt with using a needle. Farther out, tweezers and tissue paper work nicely.

One you have the tangle out, then you have to work on the round and flat. I start with the flat, but as others have said, you usually go back and forth, because you get one right, you distort the other. Each iteration gets better. It is important that you understand the theory of truing a hairspring and think about what you are doing. You have to plan each move ahead of time. If you do not take the time to thing, you will cause a new problem that you then have to undo. As Samantha said, out of flat problems are corrected 180 degrees before the worst of the problem, but out of round problems are corrected 90 degrees before the worst of the problem. It is really difficult to explain without pictures. Fried has great drawings to use as examples.

It also pays to practice on a rusty old hairspring. You create problems then correct them over and over.

Don
 

FredWJensen

Registered User
Feb 1, 2007
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I think that some of the problems are coned out of the plane. A seem to have gotten the tangle out but the out of plane coning is my main problem. I have to fried book and it works fine for simplistic deformations. When you combine coning with other defects there you have the complication. Fried shows pulling the collet through the cone in the opposite direction but it is not that simple here because it is not uniformly coned but only in sections so I guess I have to hold the collet and several coils and pull them through to straighten. It is true that you have to think ahead, hairspring straightening is like playing chess. Either way, I will work it until it is straightened good enough. Otherwise I may have to get a replacement.
 
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Don Dahlberg

Registered User
Aug 31, 2000
3,425
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38
Coning is a pain, but you can work it out. Work on the cone, the out of flat, the out of round. Go around and around and work from the collet out. Eventually you will be amazed what you can do.

It is nearly impossible to find a replacement hairspring and when you do, you have to get it to keep the right time. It is worth the time to keep the old hairspring if at all possible. In the long run, it is less work than replacing it unless you have a huge stash of raw hairsprings and the tools and experience to vibrate it.

Don
 

FredWJensen

Registered User
Feb 1, 2007
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In plane repairs are made at 90 degrees and out of the plane made at 180 degrees, is that right?
 

Genway

Registered User
Feb 20, 2009
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San Jose, California
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Before you start to work on hairspring, you need to close the collet so after you finish the hairspring you will not ruin your work by accidently touch the hairspring, the work force on collet is greater so it is harder to control the position.
Here I made one diagram based on your hairspring, basically when close to the center, you need to work on more area to closing the coil smaller, after that will be easy ob outer coils.
Set the collet on a pin vise smaller enough to hold from center. Do not worry about plane yet, after you true the coil, it is much easier to correct the plane.

58.jpg
 

jimtone

Registered User
Dec 28, 2011
15
0
1
This hairspring is from a clock, is this procedure also possible for a watch spring? I'm guessing not? I have 3 Ingersoll Mickey Mouse watches that have hairsprings less snagged than the one in the diagram above, and the shag is all closer to the outside of the coil where it is coming in to contact the balance.
 

glenhead

NAWCC Member
Nov 15, 2009
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Williamson County, Texas
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It's pretty much the same, yes. Start at the center, work your way around and out. It takes a LOT of patience and a very steady, delicate hand. Don't get in a hurry, and don't try to force things.

Glen
 

tkarter

Registered User
Apr 14, 2011
501
1
18
most helpful thread ever right here.
 

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