Haikosha 31 day Automatic Calendar

PaoloGal

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May 5, 2022
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Thank you for accepting me into your group.
I have yet to get familiar with the forum so sorry if I posted the photos without any description.
I immediately come to my question: I found this Japanese watch from several years ago in an old box (in what year do you think it was built?) And I would love to refurbish it !!
Do you think this adventure is worth trying?
I have a small watchmaking workshop where for several years I have been repairing only quartz and mechanical wristwatches. I have never repaired pendulum clocks and this is a great challenge!
I await some advice from those who are much more experienced than me.
Thank you .
PaoloGal
 

Steven Thornberry

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I have merged the two threads on this clock. Please use the text box at the bottom of the thread to reply and add additional information.
 

tracerjack

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It is certainly a movement worth restoring. And, your experience with watches will help you to understand how the clock movement works. The only issue I see is the cost of tools that you will need that are specific to clocks. When I went from clocks to watches, none of my clock tools were useable. I had to purchase tools specific to watches. If you see yourself wanting to repair several clocks, the cost of tools would be acceptable. If you only want to restore this one movement, you would do better to spend about the same amount of money that you would need to spend on clock tools by taking it to someone who does clock repair.
 

shutterbug

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I have never encountered one like that. It looks a bit more Korean than Japanese to me, and the 31 day varieties are usually pretty poorly made. I usually convert them to typical 8 day clocks by using shorter mainsprings. Just for customer safety.
 

kinsler33

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It is certainly a movement worth restoring. And, your experience with watches will help you to understand how the clock movement works. The only issue I see is the cost of tools that you will need that are specific to clocks. When I went from clocks to watches, none of my clock tools were useable. I had to purchase tools specific to watches. If you see yourself wanting to repair several clocks, the cost of tools would be acceptable. If you only want to restore this one movement, you would do better to spend about the same amount of money that you would need to spend on clock tools by taking it to someone who does clock repair.
Really?? About the only big expense would be a mainspring re-winder and the let-down chucks that go with it. The rest can be good-quality electronics-grade hand tools--or the questionable substitutes I use.
 

tracerjack

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Really?? About the only big expense would be a mainspring re-winder and the let-down chucks that go with it. The rest can be good-quality electronics-grade hand tools--or the questionable substitutes I use.
Well, I was also assuming it would need some bushings, so there’s reamers, handle, broaches, and bushings. Altogether, I think you would be spending about $400, which is in the ballpark for professional repair. Yes, I agree there are ways around the expense, but I still think it really comes down to whether the OP wants to repair just this one clock or plans to continue with several more.
 

PaoloGal

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It is certainly a movement worth restoring. And, your experience with watches will help you to understand how the clock movement works. The only issue I see is the cost of tools that you will need that are specific to clocks. When I went from clocks to watches, none of my clock tools were useable. I had to purchase tools specific to watches. If you see yourself wanting to repair several clocks, the cost of tools would be acceptable. If you only want to restore this one movement, you would do better to spend about the same amount of money that you would need to spend on clock tools by taking it to someone who does clock repair.
What you say is perfectly right, but having some free time between one customer and another I think it helps me to relax and better understand the real world of watchmaking !!! I'm building a Mainspring Winder to be able to put those two "Monsters" of springs in total safety and then proceed with the disassembly of the movement!
I'm thinking of photographing all the disassembly phases because it would be impossible (at least for me) to reassemble everything.
Thanks for the nice words of encouragement!
 

PaoloGal

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Well, I was also assuming it would need some bushings, so there’s reamers, handle, broaches, and bushings. Altogether, I think you would be spending about $400, which is in the ballpark for professional repair. Yes, I agree there are ways around the expense, but I still think it really comes down to whether the OP wants to repair just this one clock or plans to continue with several more.
I must first wait how the adventure with this 30-day watch will end to conclude that I can like the world of pendulum clocks or close the parenthesis and continue with wristwatches.
 

tracerjack

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Sounds like you have a good plan and understand what you need to do. I wish you success on your first clock movement. If you are unsure of anything, you will get all the help you need from this great forum of generous people. And yes, take photos of everything as you disassemble. Doing so has saved me on numerous occasions.
 

Thomas Sanguigni

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PaoloGal, you are wise to use photos. Take from many angles and through the plates. Make sure you can study the functions before disassembly. When it comes time to reassemble, you can refer to your photos. When letting power down, the springs will still possess considerable strength. I usually will manually turn or pull out a few more feet. When you separate the plates, the springs tend to mess up your internal arrangements. Take photos at this point too. You will benefit greatly at reassembly.

What part of Italy do you live in? My family came from the Pisa area and are natives of Molina di Quosa.
 

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