H. Northrup: Another Quickie Post

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Jul 27, 2019.

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  1. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Nov 26, 2009
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    This forum is rather moribund so I thought it could use some activity.

    I am looking for more information about the maker of this clock and comments about the movement.

    The clock is a column and cornice:

    northrup ww.JPG

    It came along with 2 other clocks that I really wanted and it was all cheap. A bit beat up with some veneer repairs. I did like the case style which is not typical of ww clocks. I also liked the highly figured tiger maple columns. The wood dial with raised gilt gesso decoration wasn't in the worst shape I've seen.

    What also appealed to be is that the maker is H. [Herman] Northrup of Goshen, CT. Not a maker I have run across frequently. Here's the label with printer's credit:

    northrup ww 3.jpg northrup ww 4.jpg

    Also note the use of a gong, a feature of later ww clocks. Never had a bell.

    I couldn't find much about Herman Northrup. In Roberts' and Taylor's 2nd edition of their Eli Terry book, he is listed in a table on page 351. The first entry is as a principle in Northrop & Smith with the dates 1831-1836 then as H. Northrup 1837-1840. It also mentions that the latter firm produced cornice and column clocks. So the case style of my clock fits. The late date would also fit with the use of a gong rather than a bell??

    Here's the movement:

    northrup ww 2.jpg

    Based upon what I could find in the ww movement type supplement, not quite what I expected:

    northrup ww 5.PNG

    This is a brass bushed movement that looks to me more like a subtype 9?

    northrup ww 6.PNG

    It really does look like it's original. One proviso is that on the back board above and below the movement, someone added horizontal wood strips that I believe were meant to stabilize the movement. Nothing on the label about brass bushings.

    I actually once owned a very similar clock with, it is my recollection, a similar movement but labeled by Williams, Orton, Prestons and Co or Orton, Preston and Co (can't recall which).

    Any thoughts and comments appreciated.

    RM
     
  2. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    The conversion from bells to gongs happened very rapidly by most all makers right about 1835-1836. Gongs were very popular, as most of us can testify a gong is much easier on the ears than are bells, and some bell clocks were converted to gongs after the original bell installation, either by their owners or by their makers before thier sale, as the market shifted. Some of the lesser prolific makers/merchants tended to use movements by whomever had some available, so I am not certain we can draw many conclusions in that regard on this particular clock.

    It is an unusual case for a wood works, uncommon maker, nice tiger columns for certain, looks like another interesting clock you found, and have documented too! Thanks!
     
  3. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks for the information and kind comments.

    Any thoughts on the movement?

    RM
     
  4. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    I have seen these brass bushed movements used by so many parties of this approximate period I no longer have any opinions I can support. AS long as all the holes line up in the rails, the oxidation patterns fit, and the dial fits the movement\rails etc. I see no reason to think it incorrect for the clock. As to who made the movement I have to pass that on to the Snowden tables
     
  5. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks. My thoughts too. Meets the criteria you state.

    The Snowden tables are quite an accomplishment. There have been attempts over the years to issue updates but overall, I suspect that they are a work that will probably always be in progress as new info is discovered, e.g., who made and or used what movement, etc.

    RM
     
  6. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Yeah, by this point in time the clock business was a free for all and the pending depression of1837 was on the near horizon. I have documented a number of strange happenings in more my area of interest. Those happenings have no logical purpose other than people were using whatever they had, or could find on short credit, or get in exchange for a cow and two chickens. There were parties supplying hundreds of set of plates, while others did nothing but make pinions, and still others cut wheels, and still others put the movements together and then sold or traded movements to the folks who cased and labeled "their clocks." The idea of homogenous production of clocks from start to finish was not practiced by very many "makers." Even the cases were often made up of parts from several/many sources. For parties wishing to gain details on some of these operations may I suggest the book Erastus Hodges 1781-1847 by Theodore Hodges.
     
  7. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    RM,

    I love the fact that this attractively-cased clock was the one you were least interested in! If only I could run across such clocks of least interest!

    You're correct that the movement is a fit for the type 9 movements. The features are a match for the type 9.223, made by Chauncey Boardman and Boardman & Wells. Northrup is not listed among the users. But if all of the expected "tells" point to it being original, I wouldn't be too concerned at Northrup's absence on Snowden's list. Many of the listed users (at least as far as my flaky memory can recall) continued making wood works clocks almost until the bitter end, which is also consistent with the latter stage of Northrup's career.

    Snowden doesn't mention brass bushings on Boardman's movements, but I'm pretty sure I've seen them before. Were it not for the bushings, the movement is otherwise a match for the type 9.224 and 9.225 movements, which had rings or cups around the winding arbor pivots. Snowden does not list a maker for those movements. Northrup is not among the known users.

    Mike
     
  8. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks for the information and interest.

    RM
     

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