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Gustav Becker P14 Info

sparky1606

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Apr 12, 2015
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Hi all, This is my very first time at looking at any clock like this.
Basically i found this clock in my Grandfathers garage after he had past away 31 years.
Im guessing it is a mantel clock all i have left of it it the workings which has 3 winding's on it and 5 hammers on the back.
Im looking for a pendulum and the thin wire spring for the pendulum.
Also the casing which it was housed in some bird made a nest in there so thr casing just fell apart when i moved it..
Also need the glass for the clock face.
I know your all thinking whats the point but i would just like to get it running for old time sake and some history of the family.
I have the symbols GB set in a anchor like thing with P14 stamped below and a number 2506602.
Any help when be great full
 

bangster

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Welcome to the message board, Sparky. Take some pictures of the movement front & back, and post them so we can see what you have.

(I dig the Welsh dragon.)
 

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
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Calif. USA
I assume you need the three parts of the pendulum.
There would be a suspension spring, a pendulum leader and
the pendulum rod/bob.
Being a GF clock, it most likely had a 1 second pendulum or
slightly faster. The length of the pendulum from the center
of the suspension spring to the center of the bob would most
likely be about 39.5 inches. Some have a slightly faster
rate and would be shorter. This length includes the pendulum
leader. Better to start long and then shorten to match.
You are not likely to get an exact match from a clock supply.
You will most likely have to go some creative work.
Do a search on the message board here for movements of the same
manufacture for ideas as to what to look for.
Suspension springs are standard items at clock supply houses,
like timesavers.
Tinker Dwight
 

Randy Beckett

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NAWCC Member
May 23, 2012
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I assume you need the three parts of the pendulum.
There would be a suspension spring, a pendulum leader and
the pendulum rod/bob.
Being a GF clock, it most likely had a 1 second pendulum or
slightly faster. The length of the pendulum from the center
of the suspension spring to the center of the bob would most
likely be about 39.5 inches. Some have a slightly faster
rate and would be shorter. This length includes the pendulum
leader. Better to start long and then shorten to match.
You are not likely to get an exact match from a clock supply.
You will most likely have to go some creative work.
Do a search on the message board here for movements of the same
manufacture for ideas as to what to look for.
Suspension springs are standard items at clock supply houses,
like timesavers.
Tinker Dwight
I don't think it is a GF movement Tinker. The P14 marking would likely be the pendulum length(14 CM), rather than the movement number.
 

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
13,666
72
0
Calif. USA
Your right Randy, I saw Grandfather and didn't notice mantel
clock.
14 CM would be a short pendulum for such a clock if measured
from the suspension. From the picture, I'd suspect that was the
length of the crutch.
I think he'd have to make an experimental pendulum to
get in the right range.
Tinker Dwight
 

John Hubby

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Sep 7, 2000
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Hi all, This is my very first time at looking at any clock like this.
Basically i found this clock in my Grandfathers garage after he had past away 31 years.
Im guessing it is a mantel clock all i have left of it it the workings which has 3 winding's on it and 5 hammers on the back.
Im looking for a pendulum and the thin wire spring for the pendulum.
Also the casing which it was housed in some bird made a nest in there so thr casing just fell apart when i moved it..
Also need the glass for the clock face.
I know your all thinking whats the point but i would just like to get it running for old time sake and some history of the family.
I have the symbols GB set in a anchor like thing with P14 stamped below and a number 2506602.
Any help when be great full
Sparky, welcome to the NAWCC Message Board and thanks for your inquiry and posting the photos of the movement of your clock. First of all, based on the movement serial number your clock was made about March-April 1925, shortly before GB changed their serial numbering system in May that year. Your clock is one of the last ones made with the overall sequential serial numbering system; we estimate the highest serial number under that system was around 2510000. From May 1925 onward they restarted the numbering of this type of movement with the number "1". From a dating standpoint the problem is that they also restarted at least three other types of movements with the number "1" so there are hundreds (thousands, actually) of duplicate, triplicate, and quadruplicate numbers, making it a real challenge to project accurate dates between mid-1925 and the end of 1932 when all production was stopped at the Freiburg factory.

Your movement is a GB Westminstergong No. 7 that was first introduced in 1912 with a pendulum length of 18 cm (P18), measured from the suspension to the bottom tip of the pendulum rod. The pendulum length was changed in 4th quarter 1924 to 14 cm length (P14) and remained that size until Freiburg production was stopped at the end of 1932. The movement design did not change, only the pendulum length and it "is" quite short but that is the correct length. I think this change was made because the "napoleon hat" mantel and table clock designs became popular and they needed a shorter pendulum to fit the shorter cases. Is it possible to see what is left of the case of your clock? We might be able to find a model number in one of our GB sale catalogs that would show what it originally looked like, and from that you could find a suitable case. Also, do you still have the rod gong for the Westminster chime? It would have been mounted to the right side of the rear door opening of the clock case and would have five rods. It may have the number 1041 cast into the gong mounting block or just the letters "GB".

Here are some photos of a model No. 347 GB Westminster Chime Table Clock (Napoleon Hat) to show something that could be similar to what your clock originally looked like:

2507522 Front.jpg 2507522 Logo-P14.jpg 2507522 Mvmt Back.jpg From these photos you can see exactly the pendulum you will need, it may be possible to find one from a parts clock or as a part on the internet auction sites. There are sometimes good cases to be found as well and the gong rod assembly if yours is missing. I should mention there were a large number of models and designs so would not be surprised if your original case looks different from this one.

Good luck with getting your clock back in operation, keep us posted on your progress.
 

Homer Santo

New Member
Nov 14, 2020
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Greetings everyone! I found a Gustav Becker clock with a p14 movement at the home of a relative who recently passed away. Could anyone help me with the history of this watch? follow the photos. The Gustav Becker logo was removed and I don't know why. The serial number is 3249 and has the zero number engraved on the right.Thank you all for your attention! 20201105_143556.jpg 20201110_184122.jpg 20201105_143455.jpg 20201110_193240.jpg 20201110_193647.jpg 20201110_184800.jpg 20201114_211537.jpg
 

shutterbug

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Oct 19, 2005
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I can't tell you much. The Tambour clocks like yours were popular in the 1920's and 1930's. That might help in determining how old it is.
 
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