• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Gustav Becker Grandmother clock with issues

Devillish1

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Dec 30, 2020
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Hi I wonder if anyone at all could help me please? I have got a Gustav Becker grandmother clock that works well and keeps good time but will not strike or chime when the lever is positioned for the Whittington chime.

When the lever is positioned for the Westminster chime the clock stops at 7 minutes to 2 so i don't use that setting and it also never chimes or strikes on that setting either.
Today we tried to get the striker and chimes to work but the clock will strike 13 and then the next hour it will strike 8 or 2 or 3 anything but the correct time. It will not chime on the 1/4 1/2 hour either and if you move the lever over to the Westminster chime and i press the lever to manually start the chime it starts to chime and then stops leaving the strikers in mid strike and do not return to their rightful position.

This clock worked perfectly in every way until it was moved. It was cleaned and serviced just before it was moved so whatever has gone wrong may have been when it was moved but any help to hear those wonderful chimes again would be wonderful.
 

Isaac

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Aug 5, 2013
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We will need to see pictures of the movement in your clock to better help you. (Pictures of the front of the movement would be the best!) Sounds like a control cam or lever could have been jarred during shipping, potentially causing some of the issues you're experiencing.

This would also do better in the Clock Repair forum.
 

Devillish1

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Dec 30, 2020
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We will need to see pictures of the movement in your clock to better help you. (Pictures of the front of the movement would be the best!) Sounds like a control cam or lever could have been jarred during shipping, potentially causing some of the issues you're experiencing.

This would also do better in the Clock Repair forum.
Thank you very much.
i will take some pictures and attach them but i will also
add them to the forum as you suggested.
 

Devillish1

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Dec 30, 2020
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We will need to see pictures of the movement in your clock to better help you. (Pictures of the front of the movement would be the best!) Sounds like a control cam or lever could have been jarred during shipping, potentially causing some of the issues you're experiencing.

This would also do better in the Clock Repair forum.

Hope these pictures are of help in helping us rectify some of the issues with our clock. Thank you.
IMG_1669.JPG IMG-1663.jpg IMG-1665.jpg IMG-1666.jpg
 
Last edited:

kinsler33

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Aug 17, 2014
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There are three weights, weights which you would have removed when you moved the clock. The weights are probably not identical. Make certain that the heaviest weight hangs from the chain that powers the chimes (that is, the musical stuff.) Probably the lightest weight belongs on the strike chain, and the remaining weight on the time chain. Note that the weights may have been marked as to their position or function. In most--but not all--clocks, they're arranged (from left to right) Strike, Time, and Chime. That would but them in ascending order of heaviness from left to right.

If weight re-arrangement doesn't help then you have unfinished business with whoever serviced the clock last. It sounds like the chimes were never adjusted properly. Let us know what you find.

Mark Kinsler
 

shutterbug

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Did your repairman set this up for moving for you? I looks like he did, because your chime rods are all locked up for moving. You'll note that they are all being held in their full up position. Those locking bars are made for that very purpose. You just need to move them out of the way so the hammers can operate again. (Third picture)
I'm confused about your description though, because the clock should not chime or strike anything when it's locked up.
 

Devillish1

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Dec 30, 2020
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Did your repairman set this up for moving for you? I looks like he did, because your chime rods are all locked up for moving. You'll note that they are all being held in their full up position. Those locking bars are made for that very purpose. You just need to move them out of the way so the hammers can operate again. (Third picture)
I'm confused about your description though, because the clock should not chime or strike anything when it's locked up.
Thank you for your response. The clock was moved a good distance and it has worked and kept good timing since it has been in our home but has worked just as a clock with no chiming or striking. We locked the chimes to take the clock out of its case to see if there was anything obvious that would stop the strike and chimes working correctly and to take the photos.
 

shutterbug

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OK. If possible, take a video from the front side as it tries to operate. Post to Youtube and link here. Also, a pic of the front from farther away would be helpful. There's a mystery lever there that I can't see clearly.
 

Devillish1

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Dec 30, 2020
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There are three weights, weights which you would have removed when you moved the clock. The weights are probably not identical. Make certain that the heaviest weight hangs from the chain that powers the chimes (that is, the musical stuff.) Probably the lightest weight belongs on the strike chain, and the remaining weight on the time chain. Note that the weights may have been marked as to their position or function. In most--but not all--clocks, they're arranged (from left to right) Strike, Time, and Chime. That would but them in ascending order of heaviness from left to right.

If weight re-arrangement doesn't help then you have unfinished business with whoever serviced the clock last. It sounds like the chimes were never adjusted properly. Let us know what you find.

Mark Kinsler
Hi Mark,
Thank you for your comments. The clock was moved a considerable distance but has kept perfect time since being moved and the weights were numbered and red tape was put on the r/h weight and red tape was put on the corresponding side of the clock so we do know they are in the right position.
I am happy to use it just as a timepiece but if it chimed like it used to it would have been lovely.
Thank you
 

Devillish1

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Dec 30, 2020
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OK. If possible, take a video from the front side as it tries to operate. Post to Youtube and link here. Also, a pic of the front from farther away would be helpful. There's a mystery lever there that I can't see clearly.
Thank you I will give it a go as i have never posted to Youtube but we have not put the clock back in its case but will not strike or chime automatically but will do both if you press the lever on the left to get it to manually strike and chime but it will not do it in any methodical order.

IMG-1670.jpg
 

shutterbug

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That lever on the right side, slightly hidden by the minute hand - what does that do? The U shape on the end of it is puzzling. Perhaps a chime stop lever? or does it interface with the front dial to change the tunes? It seems to be in an odd place.
 

Devillish1

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Dec 30, 2020
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That lever on the right side, slightly hidden by the minute hand - what does that do? The U shape on the end of it is puzzling. Perhaps a chime stop lever? or does it interface with the front dial to change the tunes? It seems to be in an odd place.

It seems to slot into the back face of the clock and controls which chime plays on the clock or if you wish to have it on silent.

IMG-1672.jpg IMG-1671.jpg
 

shutterbug

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OK. That makes sense.
 
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