• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Gustav Becker 1906, 4 glass

instarclock

NAWCC Member
Mar 23, 2009
461
19
18
Galveston
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Region
Hello All,
I wanted to share a Gustav Becker I picked up a couple of months back. The anchor pin had been replaced by a steel taper pin which was too short ( even for a GB) and the anchor block was turned. A shout out to David Labounty. He fitted a replacement pin and straightened the block in record time.

The clock is now working properly. I cleaned the case up to the point I like them - not too new, not too old. It was nearly black.

Thanks for looking
Rt

F587D18C-6E0E-4AA3-8DD3-B54218CF9677.jpeg B1B22E63-F2F8-4BE8-858D-1AD679CC92A3.jpeg 672F19DE-6ACA-4896-BAEA-67B3E1719771.jpeg
 
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KurtinSA

NAWCC Member
Nov 24, 2014
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San Antonio, TX
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RT -

These clocks are always stunning with the glass and brass. Your clock dates to the later half of 1910 per John Hubby's numbering. I have a very similar clock but with more ornate hands. I also notice that the screw orientation on the back plate on yours is different than mine. Mine does not have the small hole that helps secure the click spring. Also the click is differently shaped. My clock dates to 1906. I don't remember if I've seen it anywhere, but it would appear that the click arrangement changed for GB between 1906 and 1910.

Kurt
 

instarclock

NAWCC Member
Mar 23, 2009
461
19
18
Galveston
Country
Region
Kurt
I agree, the brass cases give the clocks a lot of presence. I’ve wanted one for a long time. The only drawback I’ve found is getting to the movement to work on or adjust.

I suppose the dates are just appropriations. I bought the clock from John Hubby and used the date he provided. No worries. I’m happy to have the clock.

Thanks
Rt
 

KurtinSA

NAWCC Member
Nov 24, 2014
4,147
216
63
San Antonio, TX
Country
Region
Rt -

John's list/post was last updated in 2014, so if you bought the clock before then, maybe he modified his numbering scheme since. I do notice that he edited the post in 2019 but don't know what type of changes he might have made.

I agree trying to adjust these in the case are hard. So far, my glass case clocks are in beat and all I've had to do is regulate the time with the key on the pendulum...even still hard to get two hands in there! I had a different clock that needed to come out for cleaning. I realized I wasn't going to be able to do any adjusting inside the case, so the forum's suggesting was to do all that outside the case. I had to rig up some what of holding it like it would be in the case. Once it was comfortable about the clock, I could then install in the case and begin with minor regulation.

Kurt
 

instarclock

NAWCC Member
Mar 23, 2009
461
19
18
Galveston
Country
Region
Kurt

I got the impression that John had owned the clock a long time before I bought it. He probably put the 1906 date on it sometime before he updated his list. I’ll change my notes to 1910.

I had to disassemble my clock and, like you, found it was easier to adjust it outside of the case. I used an old standard 400-day clock base to hold the movement for adjusting. I saw a four glass clock posted here the other day where the whole top of the case lifts off. That’d be a lot easier.

Thanks for looking.
Rt
 

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