Got My Covid Vaccination on Monday

shutterbug

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I still want more information. What kind of immunity is achieved? Is it going to be another yearly fiasco where they try to predict witch variant will hit your area? They are saying that even the recipients of the vaccine should continue to wear masks and practice social distancing. One interesting side benefit of the precautions seems to be a marked decrease in the common flu.
 

new2clocks

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Is it going to be another yearly fiasco where they try to predict witch variant will hit your area?
The virus and the vaccine are too new to be able to accurately answer these issues.

And if we will need yearly booster shots, what is the big deal? It is much better than shutdowns, masks, social distancing and trying to stay alive on a ventilator.

They are saying that even the recipients of the vaccine should continue to wear masks and practice social distancing.
The key is to have the vast majority of the world to get the vaccine, at which point masks and social distancing can be eliminated. The masks and social distancing (post vaccine injection) are precautions to protect people who have not yet received the vaccine. Once enough people have received the vaccine, masks and social distancing will be eliminated.

The more people who refuse the vaccine, the less chance the virus will be either eradicated or under control.

One interesting side benefit of the precautions seems to be a marked decrease in the common flu.
Which just proves that masks do work against the spread of viruses:).

Regards.
 

John Arrowood

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Covid is a terrible thing. The hospital is sending my sister home for hospice care today or tomorrow. She broke a bone in her thigh the week before Thanksgiving and went to a care facility for therapy and healing after surgery; a woman in the room with her tested positive for the virus after sis had been there two weeks and sis also tested positive and was treated in the care facility. She seemed to be doing fairly well but started being confused and unsure of where she was. Situation got worse as time went by and she was sent to a local hospital. They found she had internal bleeding in her brain and a clot in her lung. Things don't look good. She was 83 in Feb so I advise all older adults to get the shot even if it's not 100 percent effective.
 

new2clocks

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Sorry to hear about your sister. Hopefully, she can recover.

internal bleeding in her brain and a clot in her lung.
In my response, above, I used the example of a ventilator but, as you well know, there are many horrendous effects of Covid.

I advise all older adults to get the shot
I agree and will add that it is important that everyone gets vaccinated.

even if it's not 100 percent effective.
The Pfizer and Moderna shots have a 90 to 95 percent efficacy, which is outstanding and unheard of in any medical procedure.

Regards.
 

Dick C

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This chart was from the Daily Mail in the U.K.

Can someone from the U.K. explain to me why the Pfizer vaccine tends to lose its effectives from the 1st shot after 90 days?

Will this same effect happen after the 2nd shot and the next 90 days?

thank you,
Dick
 

glenhead

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This chart was from the Daily Mail in the U.K.

Can someone from the U.K. explain to me why the Pfizer vaccine tends to lose its effectives from the 1st shot after 90 days?

Will this same effect happen after the 2nd shot and the next 90 days?

thank you,
Dick
(Another TL/DR, sorry.) It doesn't lose its effectiveness per se. Getting the second shot within the window stimulates another heavy response from the immune system while the body is still incorporating the first shot. The first shot makes the body say "Hey! I need to fight this!", and the second shot makes the body say "Ermahgerd, there it is AGAIN, I'll really kick the response into high gear." Sort of like putting up 2-by-4s to back up the thin plywood covering the window in the zombie apocalypse. If you wait too long it gives the body a chance to come farther down out of combat mode, forcing it to start again (but not from zero). You still get a response, it's just doesn't have as much oomph. Sort of like some of the nail holes in the plywood getting a bit loose, to carry on the analogy.

The two-shot sequence is based on the one that was developed for the Ebola virus, where it was found that two "attacks" (shots) make for a very robust response. In the Ebola vaccine "robust" means 97%+ effective. The Ebola vaccine has been available for less than three years, so there's no hard long-term data, but follow-on research has shown continued effectiveness after over two years.

It's not at all surprising that people are testing positive for the virus after getting the complete vaccination series. The tests are done with a nasal swab. A positive test means you have a sufficient viral load in your nasal passages to test positive. That doesn't mean you "have" COVID-19 or that your body is supporting the manufacture of the virus, it just means you have a viral load in your nasal passages. [Gross descriptions of how you might have picked it up redacted.] The test has no ability to indicate where it came from, when you got it, how long it's been there, whether the load you have is enough to spread it to others, whether it's multiplying, whether you just tripped across it and will test negative tomorrow, or anything else. It shows you have a viral load in your nasal passages at that moment in time. That said, it's far better to still err on the side of caution and do all the self-isolation and whatnot until we have a better idea of what it all really means. The vaccine teaches the body how to keep the virus from multiplying and stops its spreading throughout the body and getting easily passed along to others, but it doesn't stop the virus from showing up on body surfaces.

My wife and I (63 and 62 respectively) got our first doses of Pfizer two days ago on Monday (15 March) and are scheduled to get the second doses on 7 April. Neither of us had any reaction to speak of; we both had to hunt around and press hard on our upper arms to find the injection sites yesterday. I can't even find mine now, 54 hours after the shot.

Hope this helps. (I just noticed you wanted someone from the U.K. to answer this. Sorry about that. My wife is English and we visited there in October of 2019, does that count?)

Glen
 

novicetimekeeper

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There was an excellent bit on the BBC about responses to the vaccines. There are two types of immune response, one is an ancient one like fight or flight which is very different in different people. It responds all out to an attack and can over react. It explains in part why people react so differently to infection. The other is the more complex process of identifying the infection and creating antibodies to that specific threat.

That second one is what the vaccine is for, just giving that mechanism a chance to recognise a feature of the virus and the appropriate response by giving it a non replicating threat to work on and subsequently be prepared should that same feature be seen in another threat appearing later.

We need to vaccinate enough of the World before this virus mutates to a strain the vaccines don't work against.
 

shutterbug

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I'm still going to wait until enough time has passed to be sure the vaccine does what it should do, and not something else that it shouldn't. It was rushed through so fast that I'm concerned about it. And how long does it last? A year? A month? No one really has those answers yet.
 

musicguy

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I got my first shot this past week as well.



Rob
 

musicguy

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It was rushed through so fast that I'm concerned about it.
I understand how you feel. When I heard that just after few months (after
COVID had started in the US) they were already doing trials for the vaccine I was confused.
All the DR's I saw on TV and the internet said it could take
years to find the right vaccine or maybe never. One year later and China, Russia, US, UK
have all created a working vaccine independently and they are all a little different.
To me this says that they were actually much closer to fining a proper vaccine
than I had been led to believe. I believe the shot I took was safe and will
be effective for at least a year. There will probably be a booster every year
thereafter.


Rob
 

musicguy

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musicguy

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musicguy

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novicetimekeeper

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I'm still going to wait until enough time has passed to be sure the vaccine does what it should do, and not something else that it shouldn't. It was rushed through so fast that I'm concerned about it. And how long does it last? A year? A month? No one really has those answers yet.

The vaccines haven't been rushed through, in fact the testing has probably been more rather than less than usual. The reasons they were produced quickly fall broadly into two camps. Since SARS, MERS & Ebola a great deal of research has been done that has shortened vaccine development time and come up with new techniques.

The usual process of development and trials has long gaps between as proposals are put forward to get additional funding to move to the next stage. The process of getting companies to fund each stage of development, testing, and preparing for manufacture can be long and tortuous. This time around Governments paid up front, made contracts to purchase millions of doses before they even knew there was a vaccine that would work. That sort of money meant there was no risk for the companies. Rather than wait they could run trials of different types concurrently, even start manufacturing before approval knowing that if no approval came they would still be covered.

Unlike the suggestion that it was greed and capitalism that made the vaccines it was actually International co-operation based on years of research backed by enormous sums of money and commitments from Governments to reduce the risk to investors in the capitalist model.

The vaccines have now been tested even further, because millions of doses have been administered and closely monitored. They are both remarkably safe and remarkably effective, and everybody who can be vaccinated should be, because that reduces the risk to those who can't be vaccinated or in whom there is less immunity gained by vaccination.

It also reduces the risk of mutations in the virus getting ahead of the vaccines we have, as the more of the virus there is circulating then the more mutations there will be.
 

musicguy

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well said


Rob
 

shutterbug

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It might be too early (as well) to take greed out of the picture yet. I heard the other day that the vaccine is recommended even if you've already had the virus. The yearly booster may or may not be a necessity - but it sounds like it will be recommended.
There was also a recent death of a woman who had received the vaccine two weeks before. That might just be a glitch, of course.
My main reason for holding off for awhile is my personal desire to see how people react after some time has passed. That and a great dislike of needles. ;)
 

musicguy

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There was also a recent death of a woman who had received the vaccine two weeks before.
And there has also been over 130 Million shots given just in the USA alone.


Rob
 

novicetimekeeper

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It might be too early (as well) to take greed out of the picture yet. I heard the other day that the vaccine is recommended even if you've already had the virus. The yearly booster may or may not be a necessity - but it sounds like it will be recommended.
There was also a recent death of a woman who had received the vaccine two weeks before. That might just be a glitch, of course.
My main reason for holding off for awhile is my personal desire to see how people react after some time has passed. That and a great dislike of needles. ;)
There are plenty of people who think they have had the virus but had no test at the time. From a logistics point of view it just makes far more sense to vaccinate everybody. People die all the time, and absolutely NO death has been linked to a vaccination.

The number of shots given across the World now exceeds any testing of any vaccine ever, there simply is no evidence that would suggest that it would be unwise to have the vaccination if you are eligible to receive it.

As to fear of needles well that's unfortunate, but you need you various jabs during life, and to travel, though I appreciate you may not travel. All I can tell you is that having this jab does not hurt at the time, so you need not fear the needle. I've had jabs that are painful to receive, this is not one of them, you probably won't feel it at all and you would be helping your community.
 

shutterbug

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Yeah, I get it. But I'm still going to hold off for a bit yet.
Another interesting tidbit though: Have you heard of any deaths from the common flu lately? It seems that Covid has wiped out the flu altogether.
You have to admit that there has been some statistical manipulation of the facts going on. All deaths are now Covid related.
 
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Tom McIntyre

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Here is 2019. I could not find 2020 yet.​
Deaths and Mortality

Data are for the U.S.
  • Number of deaths: 2,854,838
  • Death rate: 869.7 deaths per 100,000 population
Source: National Vital Statistics System – Mortality Data (2019) via CDC WONDER
  • Life expectancy: 78.8 years
  • Infant Mortality rate: 5.58 deaths per 1,000 live births
Source: Mortality in the United States, 2019, data tables for figures 1, 5
Number of deaths for leading causes of death:
  • Heart disease: 659,041
  • Cancer: 599,601
  • Accidents (unintentional injuries): 173,040
  • Chronic lower respiratory diseases: 156,979
  • Stroke (cerebrovascular diseases): 150,005
  • Alzheimer’s disease: 121,499
  • Diabetes: 87,647
  • Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis: 51,565
  • Influenza and Pneumonia: 49,783
  • Intentional self-harm (suicide): 47,511
Source: Mortality in the United States, 2019, data table for figure 2
 

novicetimekeeper

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Interventions to reduce Covid also work to reduce flu, which is less infectious than Covid. Here they lowered the age for free flu jabs to 50 to reduce demand on hospitals.

We have more than one way of counting covid deaths here, the Government goes for death withing 28 days of a positive test, so yes manipulated but manipulated down. Excess deaths is the more successful measure, though given that interventions have reduced deaths from influenza and reduced accidental death too the excess death figures are an understatement of death by covid.
 

zedric

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It seems that Covid has wiped out the flu altogether.
I am sure that most countries continue to monitor flu. Here, our stats are published annually, and can be found from https://www1.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/cda-surveil-ozflu-flucurr.htm

You can see that there were still over 21,000 flu cases that were lab verified, which means many more cases in total, but far fewer than other years due to COVID control measures reducing transmission.
 

leeinv66

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Here in Tasmania it has been 110 days since our last case of covid-19. And that case was a local in quarantine who had returned from mainland Australia. It's been 230 days since our last locally transmitted case. I'm very proud of how my state took the hard decisions early and got this virus under control. Even so, I had my first vaccine shots Saturday, two days after it became available here. Why? Because I am a believe in the old adage, it's better to be safe than sorry, especially when it comes to your health.
 

leeinv66

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Who knew that losing my spleen and most of my pancreas would be a benefit one day ;) Means I'm classed as immunosuppressed, so I got to jump the queue.
 

shutterbug

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Who knew that losing my spleen and most of my pancreas would be a benefit one day ;) Means I'm classed as immunosuppressed, so I got to jump the queue.
I suppose I'm in that class too. I just had my port removed a week ago. We were on the fortunate side of cancer patients. I'm happy to hear you are doing well without parts. Like some of the clocks I put back together! :chuckling:
They say that type O blood seems to have more resistance to Covid. I hope that's true, 'cause I am. Also vitamin D is supposed to help resist it.
 
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Mike Phelan

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We've had our Pfizers a couple of weeks ago at a local place who do them once contacted. Slightly sore arm for a day.
Final jab is early April, but we'll still stick to masks and keeping distances. We're both in late seventies.
Uncle Boris has decided that our Pfizer jabs need updating, so instead of ours being on the second week in April, they're now April 1st. Hope that's no significance in that! ;)
 
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roughbarked

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Well, as I said; underlying lung conditions mean I'm booked in for April 7. :)

As for benefits; Over the decades so many people have asked me why did I stay here where I was born?
Finally, I can say well, living in the outback of the styx can't be all bad. I've not had to fear the virus here at all.
 

roughbarked

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Well, as I said; underlying lung conditions mean I'm booked in for April 7. :)

As for benefits; Over the decades so many people have asked me why did I stay here where I was born?
Finally, I can say well, living in the outback of the styx can't be all bad. I've not had to fear the virus here at all.
Only strange effects I had from my first shot of the Astra Zeneca, were nothing indicated by the published data.
Difficult to describe but as I said, it was not one of the expected reactions.
Closest descriptions would be something like glue ear or otherwise like congestion of the eustacian tubes.
Weird but it is something I haven't experienced since childhood and as such was unusual. May not even be linked to the vaccine but it could be seen as odd that it coincided with the first day of vaccination.
 

Kevin W.

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Booked for April 28 for my first covid shot, second one will be in August, its great news for us here.
 

new2clocks

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Booked for April 28 for my first covid shot, second one will be in August, its great news for us here.
Kevin,

I thought the second Pfizer shot is 3 weeks after the first, Moderna is 4 weeks and the J&J is just one shot. You are receiving your second shot 3 months after your first?

Regards.
 
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Kevin W.

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Yes new to clocks, its Moderna or Phizer they are giving. Yes its that far apart i will get them. Happier that i wont be getting Astra Zeneca. Its the same for everyone that i know here.
 

Kevin W.

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I am guessing so, Canada is WAY behind everyone else in getting vacinations.
 

roughbarked

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I am guessing so, Canada is WAY behind everyone else in getting vacinations.
So are we but every person I spoke to had an appointment exactly 12 weeks after the first injection. The masses here are getting the Astra Zeneca, whatever. Only the politicians, the health workers and the super privileged are getting the Pfizer jab.
 

Kevin W.

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Roughbarked i cant answer your question. Just saying what i know.
 

novicetimekeeper

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We get a card stating what you get, batch number etc, you have to present it when you go back but they will have the information anyway.
 

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