Gluing paper dials

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by johnboy, Jul 13, 2015.

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  1. johnboy

    johnboy Registered User

    Apr 15, 2007
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    What is the preferred adhesive for gluing paper dials to dial pans? An adhesive is needed that will not bleed through to the front of the paper dial. I am repairing an Ingraham short drop regulator that I need to replace the dial and I want to be sure the adhesive doesn't bleed through, which has happened in the past.
     
  2. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    I generally double-stick tape.
     
  3. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    johnboy. For what it is worth, there are "paper clock dials" and "paper clock dials"......paper that resists liquid absorption and papers that act like a blotter.

    I personally have used "wall paper" paste to attach clock dials I've made using "photograph" paper....the same kind of paper and paste that we used years ago in photo albums.

    I think that if I wasn't sure if the paper dial was somewhat moisture resistant, that I would apply a very thin coating of egg white to the back of the paper dial.....as a matter of fact, I suppose you could use egg white as a cement. The main thing is to assure the replacement paper dial is removable without damaging the original underlying dial finish.

    i'd avoid spray adhesives.

    "DO NO HARM"
     
  4. hookster

    hookster Registered User
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    I use a regular glue stick and make sure that I smooth the dial down on the base with a small flexible plastic scraper. Works fine and lasts and does not seep into the paper. Also does not dry or stick too fast, hence giving you some time to move the dial around a bit to center it.
     
  5. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
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    I'm also interested in what others are using. I have used 3M "Super 77" multipurpose spray adhesive with no problems, mostly with dials laser printed on photo paper. Have also used a 3M spray product intended for mounting photos. That product cost about four times as much and didn't hold any better. I would assume that the acidity of the glue would be important to prevent damage to the paper.

    Eskmill stated, " The main thing is to assure the replacement paper dial is removable without damaging the original underlying dial finish". I' curious why one would cover a dial that was worth protecting with a replacement? When I replace a dial the original is shot.

    I acquires a Japanese schoolhouse clock a few months ago and it had had three layers of paper dials. Whatever was used to glue the first (original?) apparently caused the steel pan to rust and pucker the and stain the original. The other replacements are just awful. Point is that perhaps one should also consider what the replacement is being glued to, and whether the glue being selected might promote rust.

    RC
     
  6. Fitzclan

    Fitzclan Registered User

    Jul 20, 2014
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    I only replace a paper dial l when the original is too far gone to be legible from a distance or warped or ripped so that I'm not interested in saving it.

    That being the case I remove the original so as to get good adhesion, spray both dial pan and back of the new dial with Krylon spray adhesive, replace old grommets and done. The dials I use are printed on card stock and I haven't had any bleeding through problems.
     
  7. lpbp

    lpbp Registered User
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  8. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    3M and other "spray-on" adhesives can be very aggressive, permanent and the "over-spray" is messy requiring a petro-chemical solvent to rid.

    Use it and create a problem for another generation to deal with the nasty stuff. :excited:
     
  9. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    Actually I have changes a couple dials that I glued with this stuff after creating a better quality print. There was no real problem. The glued dial just peeled off in one piece. It seem to have some elastic properties. As for the overspray, I agree it is nasty. Acetone takes it off of skin and other objects but don't get it on the dial. Also the alignment must be right at first drop - no second chance to reposition once down.

    RC
     
  10. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    FWIW, I've used rubber cement with good results, making sure at the outset that the dial pan is as clean as possible. None of the clocks have complained to date.
     
  11. SteveGus

    SteveGus Registered User

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    What I use for decoupage is a 1:1 mix of ordinary white Elmer's style glue and water, which I apply to both surfaces with a sponge brush. This makes positioning somewhat easier as well.
     
  12. wow

    wow Registered User
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    I, also use rubber cement because it does not draw and wrinkle the paper like other glues. It comes with a brush for spreading, which makes things very easy.
     
  13. johnboy

    johnboy Registered User

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    Wow . Thanks for all the response. I guess I should have said that I need to reglue the original paper dial. The dial is about half loose and needs reglued.
     
  14. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Not claiming that it's either good or bad, I also use a spray adhesive. It's much easier to control the amount of glue applied and when done carefully, will not bleed through. I glue the back of the dial only, and then put it on the clock. That avoids the over spray issue that Les mentioned.
     
  15. dAz57

    dAz57 Registered User

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    I do the same, never had a problem
     
  16. scott64a

    scott64a Registered User

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    I've used a dab of Elmer's on either a toothpick or a sliver of card stock to get it between the base and paper with good results. I've also used liquid nails in a pinch and spread it really thin.

    With any adhesive, and for full dial replacements, it'll start wet, and shrink back as it dries. Sandwich the dial between tow heavy books to keep the front side from curling inward. :)
     

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