Glass holders for crystal regulators

jakematic

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Sep 26, 2014
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The little U shaped bumpers that go in the channels and hold the glass steady are what I need.
I can't for the life of me remember what these things are called, or figure out what material to use that will hold up over time.

Anyone have any suggestions as to what to use ? Thanks-Jake
 

Rob P.

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If what I think you're describing is what I think it is, it's called a "glass stop". Anything that fits works.
 

jakematic

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Thanks guys - my brain is already on vacation this week...

Fuel line sounds perfect.
Makes me wish I still had some air line leftover from when I kept saltwater aquaria.
 

jakematic

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At least now I can go to a section of Lowes instead of wandering around with a glazed look on my face :rolleyes:
 

MartinM

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Elmer's glue works well.
It has enough hold to keep panes from rattling, cleans up easily, is essentially invisible and is completely reversible.
 

MartinM

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I generally assemble the case after whatever restoration/lacquer work is done and then apply the glue to all of the glass/brass connections (both sides.) letting it run well into the brass channel.
Let it dry, in place on the clock as it will be 'in use' for an hour or so and then hit the whole case with some glass cleaner, used sparingly.
If you get great globs on the glass, you can use a razor blade to speed the clean-up.
You can install the brass leaves some cases include (to stop the rattling, ostensibly) as normal.
I can attest that when the time comes to take it apart, that some warm water is all that's needed to liberate the glass.
I found this out after some 'teenage antics' occurred involving a golf ball.
It was on an American Cuckoo Clock Company triple chime in a great massive case with thin brass channels and thin glass panes.
The noise the clock would make on strike and chime was horrible. Now, 'glazed' like this, it's sound is very pleasant and rich and the clock just feels more expensive.
I'm sure that on the crystal regulators I've done this to, that the glass is much 'safer', now, as well.

ETA: I suppose a cleaner way to get the best result would be to do just the bottom edge of all the vertical panels, first, let that dry and then invert the case and do the top edges of them all, follow-up by doing the other four sides, the same way.
That would allow maximum product to stay in the channel and ultimately, make less of a mess.
I just don't have that kind of time or patience.
 
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jakematic

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That makes sense, and I think judicious application would make for easy cleanup.
Was thinking that a water soak might loosen it but I've never unglued anything that was this delicate before.

Tightening up the glass would likely make the strike better as well, especially on the one where the glass is practically falling out to begin with.
Replacing the thin shim of wood where the gong base attaches should also help now that I know it's there.

Thank you for tips :D
 
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JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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Ask your local optometrist to let you have a few inches (or as much as you need) of 'optician's friend'. It is a plastic strip used to make lenses fit into the glasses frame when they have been cut a fraction too small. It's useful stuff and should work well for you.

JTD
 

shutterbug

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Ask your local optometrist to let you have a few inches (or as much as you need) of 'optician's friend'. It is a plastic strip used to make lenses fit into the glasses frame when they have been cut a fraction too small. It's useful stuff and should work well for you.

JTD
Hopefully that stuff is not used too often for eye glasses! If so, the Optician needs a different lab! Anyway, the stuff comes in two sizes. You'd need the larger size. It's called liner, and can be purchases from stores that wholesale to the optical industry.
I think the split tubing idea would be less expensive, and probably better.
 

MartinM

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At a third of a millimeter for the thickest of that stuff, I doubt it'd be much help in taking out the slop we typically see in clock case applications. (Unless you stuffed numerous strands into the channel.) If you can reliably split the aquarium tubing or silicone fuel line, it sounds like a better idea.
 

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