Gilbert Standing Regulator 16 Pinwheel Movement

Dick C

Registered User
Oct 14, 2009
1,836
91
48
Country
I recently purchase a Gilbert Regulator 16 that has the 3 jar mercury pendulum and a pinwheel movement. Each of the main case pieces have "No 5" painted on the back. The movement bracket in this clock is made of two wood pieces, much like that in the Gilbert Standing Regulator 7 that I had. My assumption is that this is an early version of this clock. There are not other strange holes in the inside back of this case. The case and finish appear to be original with the exception of 3 and possibly 4 of the finials. The top finial is an original.

When disassembling the huge clock I find that the weight is literally "hanging by a thread" where it enters the winding arbor barrel. The interesting thing is that I can see the entry hole and the movement of the end of the cable when I look in the hole. It appears that with this movement there is not an exit hole that I can find so I am assuming that I have to break down the movement in order to repair the cable.

. Is my assumption correct?

. If so, then I have to remove the hands. When doing so, the sweep second hand easily lifts off of the post and I am able to unscrew the next portion. Now I have the square post holding the hour hand with a flat knurled fixture holding the hand to the post. What is the easiest way to release this knurled fixture without scratching the surface of the dial and without destroying the knurled portion?

. Assuming that I can get the hands off and the dial is simply held by the four posts, are there any cautions that I must follow in order to get at the inner end of the cable? Am I going to run into soldering or other problems.

. Is there a simpler way to replace this cable?

Here are some photos of what I am dealing with and more can be made available. Thanks for any guidance.

IMG_2816.JPG IMG_2784.JPG IMG_2804.JPG IMG_2828.JPG IMG_2829.JPG IMG_2831.JPG IMG_2834.JPG IMG_2835.JPG IMG_2837.JPG
 

bruce linde

ADMIN / MODERATOR
NAWCC Member
Donor
Nov 13, 2011
8,872
1,378
113
oakland, ca.
clockhappy.com
Country
Region
Is my assumption correct?
i predict you will find a hole in the front side of the great wheel that contains the knot holding the weight cord in place... and that you will have to disassemble the movement to get to it.






. If so, then I have to remove the hands. When doing so, the sweep second hand easily lifts off of the post and I am able to unscrew the next portion. Now I have the square post holding the hour hand with a flat knurled fixture holding the hand to the post. What is the easiest way to release this knurled fixture without scratching the surface of the dial and without destroying the knurled portion?

i'm not sure those are the original hand washers, but notice that the round minute hand washer has a square hole and is turned 1/4 turn to connect with the four corners of the brass cannon the hand sits on. the hour hand seems to have a square washer with square hole, with the knurled pattern available in four smaller areas on the outside edge of the washer. i predict you'll be able to grab those smaller areas with thumb and index finger.... all you need to do is turn it counter-clockwise 1/4 turn as it holds the hour hand in place just like the minute hand washer does.





. Assuming that I can get the hands off and the dial is simply held by the four posts, are there any cautions that I must follow in order to get at the inner end of the cable? Am I going to run into soldering or other problems.

you shouldn't have any issues... although i would replace any brass cable with 1.4mm braided nylon cord... easier on the great wheel, peace of mind, etc.

my standard practice is to at least clean (if not service) movements of new acquisitions, just so i can start fresh... and know i won't get bit by some issue a few months down the road. there are multiple articles on the MB about how to work w/ these movements. if you get stuck, send me a PM.

p.s.: jealous. :)
 

S_Owsley

NAWCC Member
Jan 24, 2011
278
70
28
67
San Francisco
Country
Region
What a fine clock! I can't offer advice, but I have to say I am very impressed with what you have gotten yourself into!
 

Dick C

Registered User
Oct 14, 2009
1,836
91
48
Country
I have been able to get the hands removed as well as the dial, exposing the box and the movement.

Now the question is how do I remove the movement or the back plate from the box?

I see the 4 machine screws holding the bottom of the movement to the box and the 4 brass pieces protruding into the top of the box.
However, it appears that if I were to remove 2 or 4 of the machine screws from the box I would not be able to remove the movement or the back plate as the box is rigid.

Is there a trick or science to this? I do need to get to the winding arbor so I can replace the cable/cord.

Thanks again,
Dick
 

bruce linde

ADMIN / MODERATOR
NAWCC Member
Donor
Nov 13, 2011
8,872
1,378
113
oakland, ca.
clockhappy.com
Country
Region
this might help:

 

Dick C

Registered User
Oct 14, 2009
1,836
91
48
Country
Mr. Linde,

You are fantastic. The video is just what I needed as it covered all of the questions that I had.

You and this video convinced me that I probably should use the woven nylon to replace the brass cord that is in it now. Will have to find a source for it.

Thank you
Dick C
 

bruce linde

ADMIN / MODERATOR
NAWCC Member
Donor
Nov 13, 2011
8,872
1,378
113
oakland, ca.
clockhappy.com
Country
Region
first off, they only call me 'mr. linde' when they ask me to remove my driver's license from my wallet... it's 'bruce'. :)

second, i don't get credit just because i found (and utilized) those resources before you did.

third, i said 1.4mm braided nylon cord but that's really overkill. any 1mm cord will be more than enough. i get mine on amazon... look for positive reviews, the phrase 'non-stretch', etc. i typically go with 'chocolate', but you can also go lighter and (per david labounty) easily stain with tea. :)
 

Forum statistics

Threads
167,147
Messages
1,456,506
Members
87,334
Latest member
fredericdb
Encyclopedia Pages
1,057
Total wiki contributions
2,914
Last edit
E. Howard & Co. by Clint Geller