Germany's Market Share ?

Ontime

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Nov 6, 2012
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Looking for a general idea of how much of the market Germany had in U.S. sales in the heyday of higher production. . lets say 1880-1930. It seems as though there are always many up for sale at any given time, quite a few more then clocks from England or France.
 

new2clocks

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Looking for a general idea of how much of the market Germany had in U.S. sales in the heyday of higher production. . lets say 1880-1930. It seems as though there are always many up for sale at any given time, quite a few more then clocks from England or France.
I think you are addressing 2 different issues.

The German share of the U.S. market through 1930 is one issue. The amount of German clocks available for sale in the U.S. today does not necessarily equate to the amount of sales of German clocks into the U.S. for the period through 1930, as many German clocks (prior to electronic auction sites) were purchased in Germany post-WWII by American servicemen stationed in Germany. Today, of course, a German clock can be purchased directly from a seller any place in the world via the internet, regardless of the market the clock was produced for originally.

What I am about to state is based on the "eye test" versus actual statistics or other documentation, along with business logic, to substantiate my statements. I am not sure such documentation exists, but perhaps someone can provide such documentation.

With respect to your first point, many of the large clock producers were, in fact, located in Germany. The amount of U.K. and French clock producers combined could not equal the output of the German manufacturers during the pre-1930 period. Clockmakers such as Junghans, Mauthe, Kienzle, Becker were very large producers of clocks, both domestically and internationally. In order to be a major player in the international market, the size of the entity was important. The need to (1) set-up relationships outside of the country origin, (2) comply with the various importation laws and tariffs of each country and (3) have the financial ability (lower profit margins outside of the country of origin to create market share in that country) to price clocks in a manner that would be palatable to the consumer necessitated a large company with assets and manpower. As a result, IMO, the German manufacturers had a much larger international market for their products then manufacturers from the U.K. or France.

In today's market, it stands to reason that clocks from a country (other than the U.S.) that produced the most clocks would have the most clocks for sale.

Regards.
 
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