German tower clock

Discussion in 'Tower, Monumental & Street Clocks' started by lukeadare, Aug 21, 2016.

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  1. lukeadare

    lukeadare Registered User

    Jan 29, 2011
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    Hello,
    After repairing clocks for a little while, I am now getting involved with my first tower clock. According to graffiti, the clock was installed in 1907. The setting dial is perfectly clear, except for the makers name! The only legible text is "... Sohne, Turmuhrenfabrik Munchen." The clock drives 4 dials & strikes only on the hour. The going train has some broken teeth on one wheel. I have circled one (rear photo), but there are about 5 missing.
    My questions are:
    1 - Does anyone have any clues as to the maker?
    2 - What is the accepted technique for repairing missing teeth?

    The clock is in a small town, 2 hours out of Adelaide, South Australia. The local community are very keen to get their clock up & running again.

    Regards,
    Luke

    Adare Clocks
    South Australia.

    Moonta Town Hall.JPG Setting dial.jpg Front 1.jpg Front 2.JPG Rear.jpg Graffiti.jpg
     
  2. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User
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    Aug 27, 2000
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    Had you dismissed the notion of cutting a replacement wheel for it. I would consider a patch job to be only temporary.
     
  3. lukeadare

    lukeadare Registered User

    Jan 29, 2011
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    Hi Doug,

    A new wheel is not out of the question, but it is beyond the scope of my equipment, so would be a subcontract job.

    Luke,
    Adare Clocks
    South Australia
     
  4. gvasale

    gvasale Registered User
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    Mar 30, 2005
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    That's going to be a big project to replace that whole wheel. I think because of the thickness of the rim and that it's running off the escape wheel dovetailing in a piece encompassing several teeth would be a fine repair.
     
  5. Les harland

    Les harland Registered User

    Apr 10, 2008
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  6. FDelGreco

    FDelGreco Registered User
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    Aug 28, 2000
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    There is a Kuhn & Sohn that made tower clocks in Germany around 1908. I've got two images of their clocks but they don't look anything like the clock in question.

    Frank
     
  7. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Jun 14, 2008
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    Letting in replacement teeth would be the path I would take on this clock. Teeth have been replaced on wheels since the beginning of time, pun intended, on clocks of all kinds. Properly done the repair will be nearly invisible and as strong as the original teeth, or perhaps even stronger. It is of course quite important to find why the teeth failed. They usually fail because bearings have worn to the point of allowing the mating pinion to spin, or there was a casting flaw, or a cable or something fell into the train and a ham fisted winder cranked on it without removing the obstruction.
     
  8. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    Jun 1, 2007
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    This is a Mannhardt with Ammant´s escapement,google for pics HTH
    Burkhard
     
  9. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    Jun 1, 2007
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    I´d agree with gvasale and Jim DuBois that dovetailing in a piece of brass of the total width of the rim and to about half of its thickness ,soldering or even better silversoldering in and then cutting the teeth would be an apropriate repair in my eyes.A lovely clock by an emminent german maker,well worth being repaired!
    Burkhard
     
  10. lukeadare

    lukeadare Registered User

    Jan 29, 2011
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    Thank you to all contributors.
    Much appreciated.

    Luke
     
  11. lukeadare

    lukeadare Registered User

    Jan 29, 2011
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    Hello,
    With the wheel repaired it was replaced & the clock was running again. In the next few weeks it was found that the clock was a poor time keeper. So, a colleague & I returned & did a tooth count on the going train & calculated the beat at 1.071 sec/beat. We got close to that with the Microset & left it to the local clock keeper to monitor & do the final regulating.
    A few more weeks passed & then another call. The clock has lost 4 hours & the strike is out of synch. Another 2 hour drive & we could find nothing wrong. I set it running & reset the strike (countwheel) & left it with the beat still at around 1.07sec/beat.
    No further calls. No further problems.
    Did "Freddy the Fiddler" (thanks Chris McKay!) visit the clock?
    Also, being a turret clock beginner, I only discovered after reading this forum, that the cover over the going train winding arbor was there to activate the maintaining power.

    Regards,
    Luke

    Adare Clocks
    South Australia.
    P1060332.jpg P1060333.jpg
     
  12. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    Jun 1, 2007
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  13. lukeadare

    lukeadare Registered User

    Jan 29, 2011
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    Burkhard, you are correct. The maintaining power system is essentially the same as the one you looked at. This one is a "V" shaped bracket which is moved by the shutter over the winding arbor. On top of the "V" is a pawl which engages on the second wheel & on the lower arm is a small weight. It only provides power for about 10 minutes, so it needs to be reset during a full wind. You can hear a thud as it drops off.

    Luke
     
  14. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    Jun 1, 2007
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    Mannhardt did live (and die) in Munich=München, but he had no sons-at least not in his firm;so it is Neher&Söhne in München.
    Best regards
    Burkhard
     
  15. electric_turret

    electric_turret Registered User

    Mar 20, 2009
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    Luke,
    I can confirm that this clock is definitely a German Neher tower clock. The setting dial has had the name of Neher rubbed off for some reason but as a collector of German Tower clocks and having a Neher myself i know that is who made it. It definitely was not made by Mannhard although they both worked in Munich.

    Regards

    Andy
     
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