Georgian broken arch fusee clock

Greg Burton

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Jan 29, 2018
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This is an unusual clock that was just serviced by my local horologist. It is unsigned. The movement, which is beautifully engraved, is original to the case. The inside of the case shows that the cabinet maker originally intended for there to be arched sound frets in the sides. Those openings in the case body were filled in with oak before the veneer was applied. The front door door construction,however, seems to indicate that the lower quadrangles were never intended to be recessed as is unusual in this form of bracket clock. the oversized solid cast brass ball feet are original. The flat glass is also unusual. 10388285-2402-4B36-8014-4A3CE0121B87.jpeg
BDBC27BA-482B-4E72-8A04-F6CF78DED52D.jpeg 2E46456A-BE92-49A2-965D-8472C81D5D4E.jpeg
 

Chris Radano

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Feb 18, 2004
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Interesting. Looks like it has through the dial, or through the back winding. Missing the pendulum tie down which is not unusual. Very nice, enjoy!
 

Greg Burton

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Hi Chris,

Yes, is can be wound from the rear. What is interesting the key for the rear is a different size than for the front. Good eye!
 

Christopher Lloyd Owen

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These pad top clocks were made throughout the 19th century, and often were not signed. I've got one I'm restoring at the moment which isn't either.

As for the front spandrels, I can't quite see in the photograph of the back, but it looks like they were never there.

I've always liked those hands.
 

Ralph

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Not often signed? That’s probably has some merit with painted dials. Maybe redone? Broken arch dials were available.in the 18th century as well. I’ll try to post a couple later. A sheet silvered dial and a brass dial. One or both 3 pad tops.

A McCabe and a Dutton.

Ralph
 

DeanT

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Here's a miniature version of the broken arch.

Front.jpg E27.JPG
 
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P.Hageman

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Why do you call this a broken arch case:???: I don't think thats the case here (no pun) From what I always knew this is a broken arch case: Or do I miss something?

broken 1.jpg broken 2.jpg
 

P.Hageman

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@ Jonathan, stupid of me, indeed you are right! Hmm, and that after all those years collecting :banghead:
 

Christopher Lloyd Owen

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Sorry, Greg, that your original post has digressed into semantics and away from your original point about the clock and/or dial being unsigned!

But, Chris, the one thing I'd place a bet on is that Greg's dial is round or circular ....
 

DeanT

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I think the correct term is break-arch. There are a few examples from 1715-20 but generally they became popular after 1750. The can have pads on top or plain top. A common case description is "triple pad break arch case"

The one in the pictures is around 1760 with a brass arched dial. The examples in this thread are generally the same case top but with painted/enamel circular dial.

Not idea why its called "break-arch". Just is....

bosley_original.jpg
 

Chris Radano

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Usually threads here evolve.
I think Peter may have done an internet search, and was confused why the results showed longcase.
 

DeanT

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Usually threads here evolve.
I think Peter may have done an internet search, and was confused why the results showed longcase.
Yeap and some of the most interesting and informative threads are the ones which ramble all over the place :p
 

novicetimekeeper

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I think there is a bit of merging in descriptions. A break arch is one that has those horizontal flat bits either side. It doesn't exist in architecture really but it does in clock cases. To give it balance it originally had pillars that supported the flat bit. A Broken arch pediment is an architectural feature found above doors in Georgian house, on furniture like book cases, on longcase clocks, on barometers and gable ends of building. It is a break in the palladian style architectural pediment with the straight angled slopes.

 

jmclaugh

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It probably doesn't matter if you use the term broken or break arch but I've always seen it as referring to a clock case not a dial. I think the term comes from the fact the arch isn't contiguous, hence broken or break. To make matters more confusing the dials on the longcase clocks above afaik are just called arch dials even though strictly speaking the shape is a broken or break arch.
 

novicetimekeeper

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I think language always matters, and if you have the opportunity to learn the correct terms then not to do so is an opportunity missed.

Sadly a lot of skills are going, auction house descriptions being a case in point.
 
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jmclaugh

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Is there a correct term and if so who defined it?

For example C&W use the term 'broken arch' with regard to bracket clock cases and Loomes uses the term 'break arch' with regard to longcase clock cases, the break in the arch in this case is the centre not the sides.
 

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