Gebr Kuner night switch off question

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by MarkEBee, Jan 2, 2020.

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  1. MarkEBee

    MarkEBee New Member

    Jan 2, 2020
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    upload_2020-1-2_21-51-48.jpeg

    upload_2020-1-2_21-50-55.jpeg

    Here is a clock I’ve brought back to life (an eBay find that required some serious cleaning, chain repair and a few replacement parts). This is the first click I’ve dealt with so whilst I’m feeling good about the fact it’s running well, I do have a lack of awareness in one area. I’m wondering if there’s a way to silence the cuckoo at night? I had used some sponges to block the pipes but I don’t think that’s going to be good for the bellows.
    There is a black lever inside, at the front of the movement (not visible in the image of the movement but to the top left of the image - top right when looking at the front of the movement) that appears to push the bird out and force a call, but there’s no cord or wire attached to this at present. Any help would be much appreciated.
    Many thanks,
    Mark
     
  2. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    #2 shutterbug, Jan 3, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2020
    That's a very interesting movement that I haven't come across before. There probably isn't a good way to silence it. The issue is that most attempts to silence it would still let the rack fall, but may not allow it to be gathered again. That allows the rack tail to drag along the snail until 1:00 when it could either stop the clock or bend the tail.
    You could tie up the hammer for the gong, which would reduce some of the noise, but the best way to silence a cuckoo is to stop the pendulum at a particular time, and restart it in the morning at the same time. I would suggest that as your best option.

    Puzzling over your picture - did you remove something for the pic? Your movement has a lot in common with count wheel movements. I see the gear that would drive the count wheel, but the wheel itself is not there. Some of the issues associated with rack and snail movements would not exist with a count wheel, but the basic issues are still there. But with a count wheel movement, you could put a clothespin or a clip on the fan to silence it, but still let the clock run. You'd still have to remove the clip close to the same hour though.
     
  3. MarkEBee

    MarkEBee New Member

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    Many thanks Shutterbug, you’re quite right on the movement, I’d taken a pic of it midway through rebuilding so hadn’t reattached the count wheel - it’s back in place now.
    I’m torn between stopping the clock every night (it feels wrong to stop something that’s designed to tell the time, instead making it only functional for daytime hours), however I’m not 100% sure if putting sponges in to block the air (silencing the noise completely in fact) is going to stress either the bellows or any part of the movement that connects with the bellows. See the following images:

    upload_2020-1-4_0-11-11.jpeg

    upload_2020-1-4_0-11-36.jpeg
     
  4. MarkEBee

    MarkEBee New Member

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    A n image of one of the ‘silencing sponges’ in place... upload_2020-1-4_0-12-4.jpeg
     
  5. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    #5 shutterbug, Jan 4, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2020
    The air has to have entry and exit. If you block the entry, it might produce pressure in the bellows as they try to open, and hose up the movement. What are you proposing for the hammer? You might be able to put a block of wood under the hammer rod, but that would require taking the clock off the wall every day. Or you could disable it permanently I suppose.
    If you could devise a way to put the lifting rods in the upper position, that would work fine. I guess you will have to try it out and see what happens with your idea.
     
  6. JimmyOz

    JimmyOz Registered User

    Feb 21, 2008
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    If you turn the minute hand anticlockwise to 1:00 before you go to bed and take off the cuckoo weight it will run the time till you get up in the morning, then just put the weight back on and it should cuckoo the right amount shown on the dial, then just turn it anticlockwise to the right time.
     
  7. MarkEBee

    MarkEBee New Member

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    Interesting. I was of the understanding that the hands should only ever be turned clockwise, and that turning them anti-clockwise would damage the movement?
     
  8. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    It can. Move slowly and stop if resistance is felt. Otherwise it shouldn't hurt anything.
     
  9. JimmyOz

    JimmyOz Registered User

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    It can hurt some movements depending on how they were made, as Shutterbug said if you feel resitance stop, however cuckoo clock movements with a rack should be okay.
     

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