GE "Hotel" World Clock questions

THTanner

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This GE world clock came in totally dead. I think this is a Hotel clock to alert the front desk when a room needs a wake up call? I have only seen one other and know almost nothing about them

It has a 1962 date on the bottom, the case is bakelite and it has the auxiliary 110 volt output on the back with a switch to activate or deactivate the alarm.

Are these collectible and what is usually the issue with the motors?

thanks
tom

IMG_4946.jpg IMG_4947.jpg IMG_4948.jpg
 

Molson3003

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Cool clock. Should have a Telechron rotor. I see 60 cycles, but cannot see what type of rotor.

The rotor is probably stuck due to old gummed up oil, and the internals may have worn. Depending on the type of rotor, it may have been lubricated with grease.

Check the forum and or internet for reviving Telechron rotor. There are also people who can rebuild your rotor.
 
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Molson3003

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Use a multimeter to insure 110 vac across the terminals at the field. You can check resistance, 700 ohms is usually ok.

Touch a screwdriver to one side of the field, you should feel the screwdriver vibrate.

If all checks out, it is probably a stuck rotor
 
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THTanner

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Use a multimeter to insure 110 vac across the terminals at the field. You can check resistance, 700 ohms is usually ok.

Touch a screwdriver to one side of the field, you should feel the screwdriver vibrate.

If all checks out, it is probably a stuck rotor
Thanks - it is a BF2 M1024 rotor. The gear rotates each direction and has a bit of "ratchet " resistance as you turn it.
The coil shows 740 ohms and has a strong growler response.
I will contact the telechron rebuild folks and see what they think. The rotor appears to have been taken apart and regreased as it is soldered together. A lot of grease has leaked out.

Will see what a rebuilt one costs
thanks so much
 

mxfrank

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Household timers were used to turn appliances on and off. You could use this to control a lamp when you go on vacation, or to turn on a coffee pot in the morning. The appliance you want to control connects to the socket. I believe the levers around the face control the on and off times.
 
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Molson3003

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Mxfrank is right. They were often used in conjunction with the family radio.

B2 rotors should have oil not grease. The output shaft should not be turned as it will ruin the internal gears.

It may be difficult to find a good working b2, but not impossible. If you do find one, it must match the original; as in cycles, wattage, and revolutions.

If you are adventurous, there is an excellent guide to rebuilding them available from David Labounty here http://www.abouttime-clockmaking.com/downloads/In the Can.pdf
 

Molson3003

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Mxfrank is right. They were often used in conjunction with the family radio.

B2 rotors should have oil not grease. The output shaft should not be turned as it will ruin the internal gears.

It may be difficult to find a good working b2, but not impossible. If you do find one, it must match the original; as in cycles, wattage, and revolutions.

If you are adventurous, there is an excellent guide to rebuilding them available from David Labounty here http://www.abouttime-clockmaking.com/downloads/In the Can.pdf
 
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THTanner

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This is a customers clock. Someone cut the wires on the switch and made a mess of the wiring. I have secured a new rotor from a telechron refurbisher for 120 which the customer was glad to pay. I plan to rewire the switch. Her husband told her it was from a hotel but not sure what it did there. He died in April and she brought me three of his clocks to repair. It seems the B2 rotor had 18 or 36 tooth pinions and the 36 tooth version has three diameters. This is the 15mm version which the rebuild shop has on hand
 

THTanner

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I liked the clock and decided to find one. Got one that claims to be in full working condition by the bay for the same as the cost of just the rotor. I am pretty sure how the switch was wired but can verify with the one I bought. What I don’t know yet is how the “off” function works. Perhaps whoever cut the wires did so because that stopped working. Still a bit of a puzzle but I will redo it for her even if I have to scavenge the one I bought.
 

Molson3003

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I commend you for your efforts. So many clock shops would have convinced her to convert to a quartz movement.

Keep us updated with your progress. I look forward to seeing the finished product
 

Molson3003

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A possible use in a hotel that occurred to me may have been to ensure the coffee was ready by a certain time. Electric drip coffee makers were certainly around in 1962.

Speaking of Coffee, I still need another cup
 
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THTanner

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UPDATE - the new rotor is in and the clock is running fine - but in addition to cutting some wires, someone also removed the actuator switch. It is the piece in the photo from a similar clock that points to the 2 o'clock position. Without that piece the outlet will not function properly. So unless I can find that part I won't be able to restore the outlet.

IMG_4971.jpg
 

Molson3003

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I’m sorry TH, I don’t have the actuator you speak of. Could you provide a close up pic?
I have many misc Revere parts, but am unaware of Revere ever making a timer clock.
Although not original, I wonder if there is some kind of modern equivalent.

The two Telechron clock gurus who I believe could help would be davefr and Pappy.

Pappy can be emailed at upload_2020-9-21_6-45-53.jpeg
 

THTanner

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I’m sorry TH, I don’t have the actuator you speak of. Could you provide a close up pic?
I have many misc Revere parts, but am unaware of Revere ever making a timer clock.
Although not original, I wonder if there is some kind of modern equivalent.

The two Telechron clock gurus who I believe could help would be davefr and Pappy.

Pappy can be emailed at View attachment 613390
Thanks :)

I will see if my friend will take the part off the back plate and get a good pic of it.

As of now the owner does not want to worry about it. It has not worked as a timer for 10 years or so and they just want it to work as a clock.

For documentation I will see if I can get a close up - I was planning to buy the clock from my friend and cannibalize it, but the owner did not want to pay the price. It is the same clock and a total swap would work fine. But they don't use the clock as a timer anyway and said the switch was removed when it burned one time. I suspect they plugged something drawing too much amperage into the outlet. I wish they had explained this when they brought it in - but they just wanted to clock to run as a clock.
 

coldwar

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I'm sure I have the seen contact assembly on a parts mech if is what you need.

These were termed 'radio timers' by GE/Telechron and by those involved in their service in and out of warranty. GE/T I'm quite sure later developed the idea they could sell more of them if they termed them a 'household' timer. The pull-out self resetting tabs are just the thing for 15-30-60 minute radio programs of years ago. Electric coffee pots of the same vintage as your timer had a very high current draw - Much more then just about any household radio set even considering the inrush current draw of the tube heaters on power up. But I'm sure customers used them for about anything switched on a schedule, one I can recall was aquarium lighting based on a daily assessment of algae seen on glass. I used one with a external contactor to control my outside Christmas light display for quite a while. The contact assy could handle quite a bit of current but then the limiting factor is the cord set and internal wiring size and insulation type - A 'heater' cord set would have been specified for high current draw appliance use, a standard GE practice. The front mounted toggle switch is a bypass - In one position the timer controls the rear outlet and in the other the outlet is on full time. Glad you found a good BF rotor. Good luck ~
 
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THTanner

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Thanks - good detail - looked at several on ebay but most do not show the details inside. I assume most are the same - or a suitable look alike - switch. For now the owner is happy with it as just a clock and does not want to put anymore money into it.
 

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