Gazo San Marcos Questions

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by Vercus, Feb 23, 2019.

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  1. Vercus

    Vercus Registered User

    Apr 9, 2009
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    Hello again,
    I'm curious about this Gazo. I know they don't come up very often, and I've always been kind of fascinated with them.

    I'm told this is a San Marcos, and this is the second version. Any idea when this was made? I'm guessing perhaps 70s, but am not sure. Sorry about the pictures, they're from the sale listing.

    I've heard Gazo wall clocks typically use a Jauch triple chime movement. Does that sound correct? If so, would this be a movement that would be better to repair versus replace like a lot of the more modern movements? Are they expensive movements to repair?

    I would appreciate any info you could give me. Trying to decide if this is a clock I want to add to the collection. It seems that Gazos are going for quite a bit of money, and the seller isn't asking much at all for this guy in it's current state.

    Thanks,
    Jon

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  2. chimeclockfan

    chimeclockfan Registered User
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    Dec 21, 2006
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    Yes - but some came with the Schubert's Ave Maria chime instead. These clocks were made during the 1970's up to 1986 when Gebr. Jauch went belly-up. The end of Gebr. Jauch marked the eventual end of Gazo because no other German company made all the movements required for Gazo's clocks.

    The San Marcos in all forms is a very late reproduction of a 1920's French box regulator, but with a fancier dial and pendulum. Gazo clocks tend to be desirable due to their heavily carved cases and good quality chimes.

    The price of repairs is entirely dependent on how much needs to be repaired. The spring barrels are a common wear point on these movements and the pivots are quite tiny and easily snapped. There are no modern equivalents for these movements so you'll have to repair what you got.
     
  3. brian fisher

    brian fisher Registered User
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    people that actually have Gazo clocks tend to be immensely proud of them. they were very expensive in their day. the first Gazo's were reproduction cabinets with antique movements. it didn't take long before they ran out of those and started using new. my personal opinion of this manufacturer is sadly not very high. when it comes right down to it, the clock is simply a fancy reproduction with a modern movement that was not by any means built to last(or even built to be rebuilt). perhaps if the clock is priced cheaply and you really like it, I say pull the trigger. just know that if you pay retail for a new movement as well as the cost of having someone install it, you will lose your rear in value even if the seller pays you to take it from him.

    if it were me, I would just look for an original version French box clock from around the turn of the century. this furniture style is called Henri II. most of the originals had nice European oak or walnut cabinets with good quality German Westminster 3 train movements. in fact, one of those original Henri clocks used to be on my grocery list of timepieces I wanted for my collection. I say "used to" because my collection has gotten to the point where I have more clocks now than I can handle and most surpass this one in desirability from my point of view. still though....an original French version is a very nice clock and will probably always be worth a few hundred bucks in good working condition.


    this is what I would aspire to:

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  4. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    I agree with Brian 100% - save your money and get an original clock, rather than a reproduction.

    JTD
     
  5. Vercus

    Vercus Registered User

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    #5 Vercus, Feb 26, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2019
    I'm a little surprised at the response, but I guess I shouldn't be. I was looking at the clocks from a different perspective. Not so much concerned about how they compared to the clocks they're purported to copy.

    I'm more interested about how the clocks stand up on their own, things like case quality, movement quality, etc. I was of the understanding that the woodwork was of very high quality and there was something of a cult following surrounding these clocks. Or am I wrong?

    Unrelated, but this clock has 8 chime rods and 4 strike rods. As I understand it, that would make it a triple chime. The Ave Maria chime doesn't use as many rods, right? I forget how many they have.
     
  6. Vercus

    Vercus Registered User

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    As far as the Ave Maria chime, it's actually the Lourdes Ave Maria that Jauch used, not the Schubert.
     
  7. chimeclockfan

    chimeclockfan Registered User
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    Some of these clocks came with the Schubert's Ave Maria, incorporating 11 gongs for the chime and another 4 to strike the hour. They also offered one with Ave Maria de Lourdes and the Colombian anthem which was referred to as a 'Palo Alto' chime in Gazo literature. Most commonly found would be the triple chime setup with Westminster/St. Michael/Whittington.

    The movements, while hardly the worst out there, simply aren't as durable compared to movements made during the 1920's. Small pivots, thin plates, and the spring barrel arrangement are the things to look out for. Servicing Gebr. Jauch movements is not the easiest chore and there are no modern Hermle or Kieninger movements which can be used as replacements. Some later Gazo clocks did use Kieninger or Urgos movements which can be replaced but those are beyond the scope of what you're looking at.

    On the other hand, the chime sound quality is top notch and the cases are extremely detailed. None of the domestic Gebr. Jauch clocks came in such ornate cases so there is something of a collector following for Gazo. The aforementioned array of chime melodies give more variety compared to what these wall clocks came with during the 1920's (Westminster and very little else). Alternative chime melodies such as Whittington and Ave Maria did not come into common use on wall clocks until the early 1930's by which point the Henri II style cases were giving way to Art Deco & Moderne.

    If you like the looks, sound, and are willing to put up with the movement's potential setbacks then go for it if the price is right. Given the chance, I'd probably take a Gazo over anything being made today.
     
  8. Vercus

    Vercus Registered User

    Apr 9, 2009
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    Chimeclockfan,
    Thanks for all the info. That was really helpful.
     

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