Galonne 1914 Pocket watch

Discussion in 'European & Other Pocket Watches' started by Jcole, Jun 14, 2019.

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  1. Jcole

    Jcole New Member

    Jun 14, 2019
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    Galonne 1914 pocket watch with protective case

    I cant find any information on the watch anywhere.

    It has alot of engraving.


    Please can someone help me out.

    Kindest regards

    Jai

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  2. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Jan 7, 2011
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    Hi Jai, and welcome to the forum,

    Your watch is most probably Swiss in origin, with a silver case which was originally gilt, which is what 'gallone' means. The movement has a cylinder escapement, (the 'cylindre'), now long obsolete, and claims to have 10 jewels, ('rubis'). The silver in the case is only 0.800 pure, which was a Swiss standard at the time, (towards the end of the 19th or beginning of the 20th centuries, as suggested by the dedication), and the crown and moon marking is a German import mark, put there by the Swiss makers to enable it to be imported to Germany, as it seems it was, or at least owned by a German speaker. This 0.800 standard is less than the UK sterling standard of 0.925.

    The case looks rather well worn, and the bow is not silver but plated base metal, probably brass, which was quite common. It's a shame the dial is damaged at 8 o'clock, possibly due to being dropped; these dials are fragile, being vitreous enamel on a copper base.

    A picture of the movement would be helpful; the inner back with the 1914 engraving is hinged and there should be a lip near the pendant which you can use to flip it open.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  3. Jcole

    Jcole New Member

    Jun 14, 2019
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    Hi there Graham.

    Thank you so much for the reply.

    After a little budge it came open. Feels like a tight fit or maybe not been opened for a while. I have attached a photo.

    Why did they put jewels into pocket watches? I litrally know nothing on the subject.

    Thanks

    Jai

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  4. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Jan 7, 2011
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    Hi Jai,

    The jewels are there to provide low friction bearings for the pivots of the arbors, (the shafts of the gear wheels). Because the jewels used, which are often ruby or sapphire, are much harder than the brass or nickel of the plates and the steel of the pivots, they reduce friction and wear. They're usually fitted to the wheels which move fastest. which are the balance itself and those closest to it.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  5. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Jan 7, 2011
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    Hi Jai,

    I should have added that the 'Larga' stamp is probably a trademark of Emile Barre et Cie / Camille Barre et Cie of Courgenay and Bressaucourt, Switzerland, registered 13/7/1905. This date ties in quite well with the style of your watch. A Swiss watch of this type isn't usually signed like this, most are anonymous. (Information from the Mikrolisk website index of watch trademarks).

    Regards,

    Graham
     

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