Fusee with a broken Pinion

bchaps

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Can anyone recommend a person skilled in metal/gear restoration. From the photos below, you can see the broken pinion leaf on this Time wheel. The Time spring released or broke and this is the result. I'm reluctant to tackle the pinion repair on this old movement...not the place to learn. Your recommendations are appreciated.

Bill

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bchaps

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Dec 16, 2001
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Can anyone recommend a person skilled in metal/gear restoration. From the photos below, you can see the broken pinion leaf on this Time wheel. The Time spring released or broke and this is the result. I'm reluctant to tackle the pinion repair on this old movement...not the place to learn. Your recommendations are appreciated.

Bill

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Mike Phelan

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Dec 17, 2003
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That's a strange and interesting movement, Bill. Barrel on going train and fusees on chime and strike.
Like your 123 blocks!
I'm sure that someone here (Bill Curley?) will make a pinion for you. Did the spring break, and are the barrel teeth OK?
 

harold bain

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Bill, that movement looks a lot like a cuckoo movement. If not, what is it out of:???:
Harold
 

Joe Jones

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Sep 23, 2004
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Hi Folks,
I am going out on a limb here, but that pivot looks a bit suspect to me. I am thinking that is was originally a regular pivot that rode in a hole in the plate but broke and was repaired by drilling a hole in the shaft and inserting a pin in the plate to serve as a "female" pivot, so to borrow a term from the plumbing and electrical fields. Could be wrong, but I am curious about it. In that case, would a whole new pinion need to be made?
Interesting movement. Can't wait to hear more about it and its case.
Joe
 

bchaps

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I don't see any damage to the barrel teeth. The arbor had been repivoted, but I think the pivot was snug in the pinion because 1.)it's a tapered end in the pinion and 2.)the pivot is loose in the plate hole. Does anyone feel this broken leaf could be pulled back into position and silver soldered? The picture below shows the clock...but the lights aren't part of the case ;)

Thanks again for your input as I try to determine how to proceed. Bill

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Tom Kloss

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Dec 5, 2003
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Mister Bill:
After studying at the pictures, my guess would be a re-pivot and a re-bushing done at the same time with the pinion shaft being shortened due to some sort of damage. It looks to me as if the bushing is protruding beyond the inside of the plate creating a weak, unstable pivot point for the drive stress of the spring barrell teeth. Pix can be deceiving but the bushing itself actually looks to be bent or twisted. The re-pivot job used too large a diameter hole/drill that thinned the material at the root of the pinion teeth to the point of eventually tearing out. My repair approach would be the cutting of a new shaft/pinion gear. However, the repair also should address the too long a plate pivot bodge job. The plate should be repaired/re-bushed and the new pinion when cut, should be extended in length so there would be "normal" end shake at that pivot point.

Tom :)

"Sometimes you really don't know if your being rewarded or punished"
 

shutterbug

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What a cool clock!
 

bchaps

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Tom...I think you're right about the pinion being shortened. It's possible the pinion was refaced and shortened when repivoted. The bushing however, doesn't extend as it appears. The bushing is just that loose and it slipped back on the pivot after the spring released. But, I agree the arbor/pinion will need to be lengthened to decrease end shake. That condition will place excessive load on the pinion.

Thanks all for your comments and recommendations!

Bill
 

Mike Phelan

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Bill
Nothing to lose trying your silver soldering method - the pinion is scrap, anyhow. I would include the pivot in the soldering, and use the highest melting point solder you can get - sort of bright red, and then quench it to harden.

Myself, I would probably make a new one.
 

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