Furderer Jaegler wood plates, brass/steel movement

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by THTanner, Feb 20, 2019.

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  1. THTanner

    THTanner Registered User
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    Jul 3, 2016
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    This clock was rescued from a farm sale in Western Minnesota in the condition shown here.
    Furderer Jaelgler Cie is stamped into the back plate board and IM on the bottom board.
    The dial board has an almost perfect warped arch to it. I thought at first it was supposed to be that way to clear the motion works, but I think now it should be flat since no clearance is needed.
    The time ring and number portion of the dial are elevated slightly on the dial board and I think the hands should be curved to match that domed time ring area.
    The drums appear to be wood with brass great wheels.
    In addition to the count wheel on the back plate, there is what appears to be a quarter hour passing strike wheel and a wooden lever of some sort that moves another lever between the plates, but does not at this point cause a strike to the bell.
    I was told it is from mid to late 1800s but there is nothing on the clock to indicate any date.
    I cannot make out the pencil script on the back board, but it appears something like Larose?

    the dial is 10 inches wide and 13 1/2 tall

    On these wood and brass movements, it is common to put brass bushings in, or would only wood inserts be considered proper? There appears to be at least one brass bushing in the middle of one plate, but I have not taken it all apart yet.

    No weights or pendulum came with the clock, so I will be experimenting to get those figured out.

    Any suggestions on the best way to flatten the dial board? I have flattened some unpainted warps in the past with weights and steam, but I am not sure how best to proceed with the painted dial.

    Any tricks or warnings about taking these apart? There are 6 large and bent nails holding the back board on and a few brads elsewhere. The dial was held on with 4 - 2 inch long wire hooks that simply hooked into carved recesses in the wood on the back of the dial. One side board is missing. I would like to get proper wood to replace it. I think it may be walnut or ash, but I don't know how to tell.

    IMG_3635.JPG IMG_3636.JPG IMG_3637.JPG IMG_3638.JPG IMG_3639.JPG IMG_3640.JPG IMG_3641.JPG IMG_3642.JPG IMG_3645.JPG IMG_3648.JPG IMG_3650.JPG IMG_3651.JPG
     
  2. wow

    wow Registered User
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    Jun 24, 2008
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    Flattening that dial is just guess work I think. I don’t think I would use steam because of the heat on the painted dial. Cool mist may work. I would cover the dial with a towel, place it on a slick surface face up so the wood can move easily, and then put a weight across the center. You could use a cool mist vaporizer nearby to moisten the wood. Will probably take days or even weeks to see any change. Just my guess.
     
  3. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    What you have is a German Black Forest 8-day "Schilduhr" from about 1860. I would advise NOT to try to straighten the shield. If you do, the paint on the front, which appears to be in rather good condition, would crack off in flakes. It would be a pity! These movements do have brass bushings inserted in the wood plates. These need to be cleaned because they are usually full with dirt and old, hardened oil. I found that interdental brushes from the pharmacy or pipe cleaners work well. I use acetone or mineral spirits to help cleaning the bushes. There are two sections of the movement side-by-side, the going train and the strike train. To disassemble pull the small brads or nails on top of each center panel on the back (the ones with the bushings) and pull the panel out, pulling at the top. Don't attempt to disassemble any other parts of the movement cage. These are supposed to stay solid. The weights for these clock are about 2kg each. The pendulum is a steel rod of a little less than 1m long with a brass bob. Timesavers sells a suitable pendulum.
     
  4. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Oh, and the wood for the side doors is usually pine.

    Uhralt
     
  5. THTanner

    THTanner Registered User
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    Thanks for all the info Uhralt - that will certainly get me started. The curved shield with curved hands could present an interesting image for the clock.

    I assume the 1 M on the bottom plate is the pendulum length designation.
    I have seen pictures of tall, square weights on one like this having done a search with your information. I will start looking for some.
    Is there any particular process to clean and preserve the wooden barrels? They don't look too bad but will need some cleaning.
    Is cotton string the preferred material for these?
     
  6. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    The weights are usually not square but more cylindrical. Thin brass shells filled with lead is what I have seen often. I would just brush off the dirt from the wooden parts. The weight cords should ideally be hemp rope, about 3mm thick. Timesavers sell these. Look for "natural" in the description. The 1M , I believe is a sign of the movement cage maker. The pendulum length will be more in the 80 cm range. It is best to start with a 1 m rod and cut off as needed, found by experimentation. When you cut the rod, go slow. It is easy to cut off too much by just looking at the position of the bob when the clock keeps time and disregarding the weight of the rod that is being cut off.

    Uhralt
     
  7. THTanner

    THTanner Registered User
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    thanks - those are easier to find and I have a couple in the pile - the one I saw with the square was actually a wooden movement and probably was a tall clock movement not a wall
     
  8. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Here are pictures of two of my Black forest clocks with weights and pendulums. The pendulum of the first clock is original. This is the clock that started my interest in antique clock repairs in 1972 when I found it on a flea market in Germany. The second clock has the pendulum from Timesavers. I hope this helps.
    Uhralt
    Schwarzwald3.JPG Schwarzwald4.JPG Schwarzwald1.JPG Schwarzwald2.JPG
     
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  9. THTanner

    THTanner Registered User
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    it appears that the rod is not threaded and there is no regulating nut at the bottom. So I assume there is a screw or some such on the back of the bob instead?
     
  10. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Actually, the rod of the original pendulum is threaded and the bob also has threaded holes for the rod. To change the height of the bob you "screw" the bob up or down. A disadvantage of this design is that you can change the height only for a full turn up or down or the pendulum bob would stand at an odd angle. The Timesavers pendulum rod is not threaded and there is no screw to hold the bob. I made a small wooden wedge to slide it between the bob and the rod on the back of the bob to hold it in place. The back of the bob is wooden, therefore I didn't cut a thread for a screw there but I think it might also be a possibility. When I bought the pendulum I was wondering why Timesavers didn't include anything to hold the bob in place.....

    Uhralt
     
  11. THTanner

    THTanner Registered User
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    perhaps a long (inch or so) left handed threaded top hook would allow the rod to be rotated a bit to set the proper length with the bob aligned with the wall? For fine adjustments the rod would be rotated just a bit.
     
  12. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    I think that would be a possibility. Originally, however the top of the rod is just hammered flat and formed into a hook. I found that my clock keeps time good enough for my taste the way it is. It's not a precision movement anyway.

    Uhralt
     

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