Fully wound Atmos

Discussion in '400-Day & Atmos' started by instarclock, Feb 12, 2019.

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  1. instarclock

    instarclock Registered User
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    Mar 23, 2009
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    Correct me if I'm wrong, but is this the way a properly winding Atmos clock should always look? (I manually wound the clock in the picture.) I've just recently started the clock after it having sat locked for a year or so.

    After about a month, the clock stopped. The chain remained at the bottom of the winding pulley. When I opened the bellows barrel, the winding spring was somewhat slack. I checked the bellows and it showed 25mm at 68 degrees. Within the 22 to 26mm recommended by the Atmosman site. I'm thinking the smaller winding spring should always be compressed if the clock is properly self-winding. All that said, if the bellows is good, what should I look for to make sure the bellows action is transferred to the mainspring? Could it be temperature-related?

    Sorry for the long post. I appreciate any suggestions.

    Rt
    atmos.JPG
     
  2. Ed O'Brien

    Ed O'Brien Registered User
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    Nov 30, 2009
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    Dry mainspring, unable to wind and unwind. Common.
     
  3. instarclock

    instarclock Registered User
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    That makes sense. I’ll clean and lubricate the mainspring. Thanks for the help.
    Rt
     
  4. James McDermaid

    James McDermaid Registered User
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    Apr 29, 2011
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    It appears to me the bellows has gone flat and is possibly assembled wrong.

    If the bellows is compressed as in cold it should be well back in the motor can showing a big spring in front of it.

    As the temperature rises the Ethyl Chloride inside the bellows vaporizes and expands the bellows toward the dial, front side.The chain would go forward and wrap further around the winding pulley under tension of the small coil spring, the winding pulley turns anti clockwise at this point.

    As the bellows gets cooler the Ethyl Chloride returns to a more liquid state (it condenses), and the bellows then goes flatter. There is a big coil spring in front of the bellows chamber which pushes the parts toward the back and pulls the chain inside the motor (can) which winds the main spring by pulling the winding pulley.

    The bellows should react within normal room temperature. When cold the end of the chain should be at about 7:00, and when hot it should pull the pulley clockwise to about 12:00.

    The orange / red dot on the pulley should go clockwise.

    Hope this makes sens.

    Jim
     
  5. Ed O'Brien

    Ed O'Brien Registered User
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    Nov 30, 2009
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    Jim's comment about the bellows seems to be wrong. What we are viewing is the small spring which is collapsed because the clock has been manually wound fully.
     
  6. James McDermaid

    James McDermaid Registered User
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    Apr 29, 2011
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    Good comment, I agree didn't think fully wound.

    Isn't there a slip inside the main spring barrel that allows it to expand a bit.

    Jim
     
  7. Ed O'Brien

    Ed O'Brien Registered User
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    Not sure what you mean by a slip, but there is a bridle piece inside the mainspring barrel. It and the mainspring are both pinned to the mainspring wall.
     
  8. James McDermaid

    James McDermaid Registered User
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    I have the Gerald Jaeger "servicing the Atmos 526-and 528" DVD, but I haven't actually ventured into a clock yet "fear Factor".
    I thought once fully wound the main spring could slip relieving the torque on the winding mechanism.

    If the clock is running you may need to wait a couple of years for the spring to run down. :)

    I didn't think my 528 was winding so I manually wound it a turn and it has been keeping very accurate time for the past year.

    Jim
     
  9. Ed O'Brien

    Ed O'Brien Registered User
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    Do Not Enter - the Atmos without the proper tools and a very clear understanding of the instructions. Very costly, beginning with the center arbor.
     
  10. instarclock

    instarclock Registered User
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    Roger that. I’ll order the proper tools and instructions before I attempt to remove and lubricate the mainspring. I have two 528-6 calibers built within a couple of years of each other in the late ‘50s, so I’m sure I’ll get plenty of use from the Atmos toolkit.

    Thanks for all the replies.
    Rt
     

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