French or German or both?

Ron Roberts

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May 14, 2019
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Found this movement in this black slate French case. Is this trademark Junghans, or did some French company also use this mark? Or did Junghans have a French factory?

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new2clocks

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Apr 25, 2005
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did Junghans have a French factory
Junghans (along with Kienzle, Mauthe, and Werner) had "assembly" factories in France (and also Austria and Italy) for the purpose of assembling their German made components. This was done to avoid higher French tariffs (up until 1904) on complete movements.

According to Doug Stevenson, a brief case-study so to speak is found in the 1908 Kienzle publication about their first 25 years. They established a Paris branch to assemble movements and fit them to cases. And this was changed following the 1904 French change into a showroom, with complete clocks sent from Schwenningen.

However, your clock has nothing to do with Junghans. It is an HAC movement.

I do not believe that HAC had the ability to make a case such as yours and most likely sold "loose" movements to various case makers. Whether your case maker was located in France or Germany or Austria or the UK), I do not know.

Regards.
 
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jmclaugh

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Parts of a 1912 HAC catalogue in Collectable Clocks shows they supplied complete clocks in the style of French marble clocks using imitation marble and also loose movements for marble clocks.

According to another source the Treaty of Frankfurt in 1870 following the Franco-Prussian War allowed unassembled German movements into France free of all import duties. Such movements are said to have been shipped there, assembled, cased up and sold as being of French origin which no doubt French makers were less than impressed with.
 

Burkhard Rasch

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Niclas Thorpe has it in his "The French Marble Clock" that german movements of lower quality than the contemporary french "pendyle-de-Paris" movements were installed into french marble cases by some witty assemblers to reduce production costs and to increase profits.These movements where hard to distinguish from the "real thing" by most of the consumers.
Burkhard
 

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