French lifting pins

Fitzclan

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Jul 20, 2014
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Hello all.
I need to replace these lifting pins on a Frenchie. They are quite worn and one seems to lift consistently while the other is hit and miss so that the strike is not always actuated.

My questions are:
1. Are they supposed to be the same length, and
2. Are they supposed to be angled like they are, or is that just wear?
3. Is the length critical?

Haven't paid too much attention to them before, but these ain't workin. Thanks for your guidance.
 

Uhralt

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Sep 4, 2008
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View attachment 558777 View attachment 558778 View attachment 558779 View attachment 558780

Hello all.
I need to replace these lifting pins on a Frenchie. They are quite worn and one seems to lift consistently while the other is hit and miss so that the strike is not always actuated.

My questions are:
1. Are they supposed to be the same length, and
2. Are they supposed to be angled like they are, or is that just wear?
3. Is the length critical?

Haven't paid too much attention to them before, but these ain't workin. Thanks for your guidance.
From what I've seen so far:

1. They are the same length
2. I haven't seen them angled like this so I assume this is wear or somebody modified them for whatever reason.
3. The length is somewhat critical because they need to be long enough to lift the lever reliably, and short enough not to touch the plate behind the wheel.

Uhralt
 

Fitzclan

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Thanks for the reply Uhralt. Going to give it a go. Seems pretty straight forward, just didn’t want to do it wrong then have to do it over again!
 

wow

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I have seen them angled before. I assume they were angled so they do not jam if the hands are moved counter-clockwise. They slide past the trip lever.
 

kinsler33

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Aug 17, 2014
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Yes. And they are both angled tangentially to their travel. I would observe caution, for replacing these is unlikely to be a trivial job, my guess is that the pins are not at fault. Any wear that would have occurred would be on the long side of each pin and would not have affected the pin's length.

Look for other causes of the intermittent tripping first. Possibly that wheel or the warning lever or both have drifted sideways.

Mark Kinsler
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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I'm thinking more like kins. I would move the lifting piece slighty, just shy of touching the gear. I think it will work fine as is. Willie X
 

Fitzclan

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Thank you all for your input. I am glad I didn't jump right in and decided to have dinner first. After reading the later replies I decided to have a closer look and sure enough, you guys were right.

The pins are angled purposely and the lever is beveled on its upper side so that when the hands are moved backwards, the pins will slide over the lifting lever instead of jamming against it.

Upon closer inspection in accordance with sage advice, I realized that the wheel with the pins was not pushed on as far as it could have been making contact between the pins and lever iffy.

As you can see in the photo, the lever looks to have striations where the pin has passed over the face of the lever in the past by running the minute hand counterclockwise.

You saved me from a lot of unnecessary gnashing of teeth as well as possible future issues. Thank you all.
 

Peter John

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I’ve always followed the policy of don’t cut it, bend it, or file it unless you are VERY sure that will fix it. Usually you will give yourself lots of grief if you do and figure that will fix the problem. Peter
 

Uhralt

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Sep 4, 2008
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View attachment 558823 View attachment 558824

Thank you all for your input. I am glad I didn't jump right in and decided to have dinner first. After reading the later replies I decided to have a closer look and sure enough, you guys were right.

The pins are angled purposely and the lever is beveled on its upper side so that when the hands are moved backwards, the pins will slide over the lifting lever instead of jamming against it.

Upon closer inspection in accordance with sage advice, I realized that the wheel with the pins was not pushed on as far as it could have been making contact between the pins and lever iffy.

As you can see in the photo, the lever looks to have striations where the pin has passed over the face of the lever in the past by running the minute hand counterclockwise.

You saved me from a lot of unnecessary gnashing of teeth as well as possible future issues. Thank you all.
Sorry for misleading you and glad that others chimed in. My French clocks have simple pins so there seem to be different design around. I learned something new, too.

Uhralt
 

R&A

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Oct 21, 2008
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You may need to check and see if the pickup flirt is worn, if the strike is inconsistent. Or there maybe other issues
 

Fitzclan

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Sorry for misleading you and glad that others chimed in. My French clocks have simple pins so there seem to be different design around. I learned something new, too.

Uhralt
No problem Uhralt. I’m just glad to have such an easy fix.
Sometimes in an effort to keep from bending things, I try not to be too forceful, but this thing needed a pretty good push in order to seat properly.
At any rate it seems to be working well now.
 

kinsler33

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It took years of working on stamped-out Connecticut clocks and equally-dismal modern German grandfather movements until I realized (and reveled in) the superb craftsmanship of these French clocks. As big a chore as they generally are to deal with, those parts are pure artistry, as is the scheme of the whole movement. Vienna regulators are much the same in that regard, but still.

Not entirely related: The Christmas ads and catalogs have begun arriving, and I've been looking at ads for these ultra-fancy Swiss mechanical watches that every young executive seems to yearn for, and comparing the finish of the parts to those of the watches that our watchmaking colleagues here often display. Is it just me, or are the new watches kind of, um, lousy, at least in the category of finish?
 

JTD

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are the new watches kind of, um, lousy, at least in the category of finish?
Umm, yes! At least most of them are, maybe not the very top of the range ones. Given the choice I would take a really good mechanical watch from the 1930s (but I mean a good one), over one of the modern 'creations' with all their bells and whistles.

But each to his own I guess.....

JTD
 

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