Forestville clock Escape Wheel with bent teeth

Times

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Aug 29, 2020
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I am looking for your advice on how to safely straighten many bent teeth on this escape wheel. I have no idea how the previous owner managed to bent so many teeth on this clock. I can try to do this job using Smooth Jaws pliers, but, perhaps, someone knows a better and safer technique? Thanks!

Bent teeth - Copy.PNG
 

Altashot

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Oct 12, 2017
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Smooth jaw pliers are the way to go.
lightly pinch each tooth at the root and gently pull the pliers off the tips while very, very gently squeezing.
The are not bent back into shape per say, but pulled straight.
They may need to be topped after that.

These are the pliers I use for this task and only for this task, I've polished the jaws and I want to keep them that way.
I've got other similar pliers I use for everything else.

IMG-5132.JPG

M.
 
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Times

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Aug 29, 2020
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Smooth jaw pliers are the way to go.
lightly pinch each tooth at the root and gently pull the pliers off the tips while very, very gently squeezing.
The are not bent back into shape per say, but pulled straight.
They may need to be topped after that.

These are the pliers I use for this task and only for this task, I've polished the jaws and I want to keep them that way.
I've got other similar pliers I use for everything else.

View attachment 659603

M.
Good idea to keep such tool just for this task. Did you buy it in Canada?
 

Times

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One additional question about cleaning - in particular cleaning between the pinion and main wheel on this Forestville clock. Do you ever remove the pinion in order to get full access for cleaning? Or should I simply continue rotating it while cleaning with a brush submerged into cleaning solution (or lighter fuel)? I see a little gap between the pinion and a brass bushing - was it meant for removal purposes?
I am asking because even after three rounds of cleaning I see some old grease & cleaning solution mixture coming out from under the pinion.

My intuition aka inner voice :rolleyes: tells me to STOP thinking about taking it apart, but cleaning is so important! Any words of wisdom?

Forestville - Copy.PNG Forestville_ - Copy.PNG
 
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Altashot

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Rockin Ronnie provided the link to where I got my pliers from.

M.
 

Times

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Webster escape wheel straighteners do a nice job.

View attachment 659717
Thank you! Good to know. Probably not a bad idea to have such tool if one can get it reasonably priced. I will make an attempt to straighten all bent teeth using smooth pliers and my trusted K&D staking tool. Just wondering how did someone manage to bent 19 teeth?!!! A madman?
 

Altashot

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Sometimes people mess with them.
they’ll loosen the verge cock, move it then the escape wheel spins wildly.

“Whoa! What the….” Then they jam the verge back in the wheel. Then it happens a few more times while trying to tighten the screws.

“I guess I better take this to a pro”. And thats we get bent teeth.

there are other reasons too, like moving the clock with the pendulum attached or swinging it wildly…

M.
 
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Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Round nose pliers are also good for this task. Big tweezers can be used too. The motion is a squeezing/pulling motion, not actually bending as you may think.

One or two teeth can be straightened easily. When a lot of teeth are bent, you don't have good adjacent teeth to use as a guide. That makes this job a lot more difficult.

It's probably best to take, or send, this one to a pro.

Willie X
 

wow

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Jun 24, 2008
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The Webster tool does a good job once it is set up properly. It has to be set up for each EW. I use mine only for very difficult jobs where the teeth are bent unevenly(some bent more than others). It works well to smooth the points after they have been topped. I usually use my flat nosed pliers, though, because it is faster.
Will
 

Willie X

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Yes, I have both.

I just prefer the round nose pliers and I rarely use the Webster tool. As you mentioned, it can do a good job but often takes several trials to get it adjusted. I bought mine about 25 years ago and it didn't turn out to work as well as I thought it would. I can do as good, or better (by hand) in less time.

Willie X
 
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Times

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The whole point of buying $10 clocks is to learn how-to and become a PRO.
:emoji_clock:
 

Willie X

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Yes, but that takes many years of practice and a pro can get yer wheel repaired in a short while. If you count your time, the pro will probably cost you less too. :)

Willie X
 

Times

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I bet you someone gave you the same advice 20+ years ago, but you decided to purchase the Webster tool :) and became a :emoji_clock: PRO!
 

Willie X

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Tools can be a big help but not so much for me in this case. Willie X
 

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