Flume F53 Lathe Base

Dushan Grujich

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G'Day Jon!

Seems no one has given you an answer. Myself I do not have the Flume F53, however I do have a similar cast iron pedestal by Andrä & Zwingenberger with a motor carrier, not too different than the F53.

I do not use it much as my workhorse lathe, the Favorite II is bench mounted together with Multifix M80 motor. I am using the RE60 motor, the same one as was supplied with F53 with my Lorch 8 mm D-bed lathe. The whole F53 base with motor is damn heavy, stable and convenient in use, easy to put away when bench is needed for other work.

Cheers, Dushan
 
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wefalck

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I don't see much advantage, apart from the fact that it is a self-contained unit, for use with a slide-rest. This adjustable pad in front might be useful when using a graver - but then I am not really a graver-user.
 

Betzel

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I think these were specifically designed for fine / occasional work on modern wristwatches, etc. Is that your plan?

One can never have too many lathes ;-)
 

Dushan Grujich

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How does this compare with a Boley F-1
G'Day Jon!

Boley F1 is a different class lathe. OTOH, Lorch D-bed is 20 mm in diameter, Andrä & Zwingenberger bed is 25 mm, and Boley and Leinen Reform bed is 30 mm. The Flume F53 was made for these lighter lathes as Betzel already suggested, even the RE60 motor supplied with it confirms it. Regardless of all the accessories made for these lathes they all are rather flimsy compared to the likes of F1, WW or Favorite II or III.

When razor blade testing any of these lighter lathes, a light finger pressure downwards, at the tail stock end, causes the razor blade to fall down. They were intended for staff turning and light general turning e.g. bushings, jewel hole mounting, uprighting etc.

Cheers, Dushan
 

Betzel

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razor blade testing any of these lighter lathes, a light finger pressure downwards, at the tail stock end, causes the razor blade to fall down.
I knew everything deflects, but I thought that test was just for head/tail alignment & finding the center-line against a cutter. Every day I learn something new, so thanks.

Yep. my geneva absolutely deflects this much...and I need to clean up that dead center runner.
 
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AlexandreVienna

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G'Day Jon!

Boley F1 is a different class lathe. OTOH, Lorch D-bed is 20 mm in diameter, Andrä & Zwingenberger bed is 25 mm, and Boley and Leinen Reform bed is 30 mm. The Flume F53 was made for these lighter lathes as Betzel already suggested, even the RE60 motor supplied with it confirms it. Regardless of all the accessories made for these lathes they all are rather flimsy compared to the likes of F1, WW or Favorite II or III.
Hi,

I think you guys confuse something. The Fume is a company selling Leinen and Gboley lathes. This one is a Leinen attached with a motor drive and a hand rest. See that page.
The Boley, Boley-Leinen have all a 20mm D-beth, Lorch has the flat opening to the side, B and BL upwards. Zwingenberg 25mm.The question should be: what kind of collet does it use - 6mm or 8mm. D-beth have both WW style only 8mm. This Fume style Leinen has both, WW and D.

Dr. Jons tiny picture shows a WW-Style Leinen model that takes 8mm collets.

Regards Alex
 
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Betzel

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With historic machine tools, there's confusion. Tony's website in the UK is pretty accurate. Both Flume and Boley (GMBH) in business today mainly sell Vector and Prätecma lathes, but (I believe) only to the trade, rather than individuals. Their respective web sites show some of what they still sell today.

The Vector is an 8mm hard spindle "geneva" pattern made in China (but "inspected" and/or finished in Germany) and the Prätecma is an 8mm sealed bearing WW pattern made entirely in Germany, based on improvements from the original Leinen line. The family firms of G. Boley as well as Leinen (Boley & Leinen) are (like Lorch and Wold Jahn, A&Z etc.) no longer in business.

The many geneva pattern beds vary in major diameter and have locating flats in different orientations, such as horizontal or "up" (12:00) as well as vertical or "back" (3:00) and many of them do not interchange in many ways.They all had a range of headstocks with collet ranges beyond a standard appearing 6mm or 8mm. The B&L Reform bed is unique, and the WW's should be patterned after the American Webster-Whitcomb, which is heavier and more rigid than the older and/or lighter genevas. But, there are slight variations in bed angles, though many of the parts will function well enough if mixed. The collets, even within the 8mm size, may look similar, but many have variations which prevent full interoperation. Many will fit into most of them.

I agree the base in question was designed for a lighter geneva pattern and is not well suited for a heavier WW. People using short-bed WW lathes have often replaced their pedestal with an aluminum base that functions similarly, letting you push it in and out of the way on a crowded bench. I think the power-stat idea (pulley torque converter on a motor) added a lot of value in this "convenience" configuration. This lathe and base are mine, from Tony's UK website.

Base.jpg PS.jpg
 
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Dr. Jon

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Yes I did know Rudolf Flume was and is watch maker supply company. They largely sell material and tools made by others but they also sell items that seem made for them.

The lathe casting caught my eye when I first saw it at teh Furtwangen markets when I visited but I was not looking for one, and did not want to carry it in my bag for teh rest of my trip.

That attracts me to this and here it differs from the aluminum casting betzel shows in post 9 (which i own a copy of for one of my 8mm ww types) is that the Flume castig seems to accomodate almost any very small lathe and has an an apparently ergonomic bed.

I want to know whether any one has used one of these and what they think of the ergonomics.
 

Betzel

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Honestly, I don't think using your lathe on this frame would be ergonomically much different than using it on its own pedestal. Maybe someone out there feels differently, but wouldn't your chair, bench, height of the lathe, lighting, optics quality and whether you use a cross-slide or a graver play a more decisive role in comfort and avoiding work related problems?

As an old man (myself) I found the pressure of using a hand graver for extended work was just a bad idea. I would get cramps in my fingers and my eyes were strained, especially "roughing" which is not what a hand graver was meant for, but I learned (?) it was more about me not working correctly than the tools. Knowing when to stop and take a short break is also pretty important to me now. Usually, it's when I get too close to final dimension :)

The motor is mounted on the same frame, which only means it saves space, and a lighter lathe will need a sturdy base so it does not move around, but it looks kind of heavy, which is both good and bad. It depends on what you are going to do with it. Ideally each station has it's own spot, but I have to work in a very tight space. It becomes the clean room only when I clean it :)

Do you have a large bench top? If not, might lifting it be a hassle?

Also, I think the black pad or "rest" is not intended for using the cross slide, but a hand graver, and then only for occasional very close work. I know the F-1 had an idea like this, and the KD-50 as well so you could get your face in there, I guess with a loupe in your eye socket. Does the pad adapt for right as well as left-handed work? Is it intended to be used sideways, like the F-1?

Or, is it a chin rest?
 
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wefalck

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I gather such bases only make some sense, when you can't set up the lathe permanently on your bench, but due to space constraints have to move it to storage. Probably the thing for occassional users.
 

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