Flossing My Clock?

Discussion in 'Case Construction, Repair & Restoration' started by Jim DuBois, Jul 6, 2019.

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  1. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Jun 14, 2008
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    So, here we have a pillar and scroll that some fine person redid in apparently a marine grade spar varnish. It is the nastiest stuff I ever stripped. (I am usually a purest who leaves original surfaces and finishes whenever possible) But this clock had been stripped and refinished a long time ago, inside and out topside and bottom. Just what I like, high gloss, failing finish, over interior parts? The failing finish had turned a bleached blond. It looked like the clock had sat in direct and strong sunlight for XX years. But, the wood was fine, the finish not so much. Oh, and over the interior varnish someone applied a red barn paint just to keep it interesting

    I finally found a stripper that would lift this stuff, but it all turns to a mixture of bubble gum and superglue and is no fun to remove. I finally got it down to having to floss out many of the recesses using coarse twine and acetone. I recall a curse I might wish upon the fellow who did this spar varnish finish, it called for the fleas of a thousand camels as a start.

    OK DuBois, would you like a bit of cheese with all this whine? End of rant, back to work!

    20190706_144318.jpg 20190706_144311.jpg 20190614_160806.jpg 20190614_163620.jpg
     
    S_Owsley likes this.
  2. gleber

    gleber Registered User

    Jun 15, 2015
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    Are you going to leave us hanging?

    Tom
     
  3. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Here you go...

    20190706_183602.jpg
     
  4. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    Thanks. I've heard of that, but never tried it. Good to know.

    To.
     
  5. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

    Jun 24, 2011
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    Can you tell us which products to avoid?
    I've always used aircraft stripper in my Corvette (and metal-bodied cars) work, but don't generally like what it does with wood. Citrus based strippers are supposed to be decent for biological-based varnishes, but it takes quite a while soaking to work.
    I guess it'd be best to actually know what kind of varnish was on your clock, but that's probably impossible to know, for sure.
     
  6. Gary Ewald

    Gary Ewald Registered User
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    Jun 13, 2014
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    Jasco also makes a paint and varnish remover that is intended (according to the label) to be used on antiques. I have used it over the years with good success. There are some downsides and precautions however. The liquid is potent so you need those heavy duty rubber chemical gloves and a visor to protect your face & eyes. It is best to do the stripping outdoors because of strong fumes and fire hazard from open flames. You don't want to breath this stuff for very long in a semi enclosed area! Other than that, just follow the directions on the can. You can strip off the surface coatings or go a step further, and also lift out the stain from within the wood. I work one area at a time to keep track of where I'm at. Slap on a thick coat with a 3" brush and don't brush it out as you would paint. Let it sit for 10 to 20 minutes and scrape off the bulk of the residue with a plastic scraper. Dip a pad of medium grade steel wool in the Jasco and go over the entire area again. That will get any remaining gunk off. Then I use an old tooth brush dipped in Jasco to get into all the really tight spots. If you like what you see at that point, wipe down the area with a Mineral Spirits soaked wash cloth and start the process over again on an adjacent area. When it's all done you can pretty much finish the piece with any process you are comfortable with. I like stain and then a high grade paste wax ("Pate Dugay" can be found on eBay and is the finest antique wax I have ever found. It's easy, long lasting and a soft rich shine.) And oh ya...…..Jasco is not inexpensive but it does work! Is seem to me that if you are willing to undertake a stripping project you would want to make the process as easy as you can for a few extra bucks. Have at it and enjoy the results...
     
    Jeffrey Zobel likes this.
  7. Jeff Salmon

    Jeff Salmon Registered User
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    Be careful of the paint stripper you use. The older, but more effective strippers, used methylene chloride and this is very nasty stuff, so it's harder to find now days. It is very smelly and will make you dizzy so wear a respirator. I have found that the newer strippers don't work very well, but they are not as hard on the nose or skin.
     

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