Flattening a hairspring?

glazba

New Member
Aug 1, 2009
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Hi all- another watchmaking student in hairspring hell! :rolleyes: I've managed to do a reasonable job of unmangling a hairspring in two dimensions. However, there is a particularly large lift in the spring about 360* from the stud caused by the index pins/boot as the movement fell from a timing machine and dislodged the regulator on its way to the floor via the table.

Is there a "simple" method for manipulating the large obvious vertical bend (it looks like I've begun to raise it for an overcoil) back into a flat? If I had overcoil tweezers, could I bend the spring back down, or would it risk twisting the hairspring? Is it simply a case of aquired skill and a pair of 7's/5's pulling in an opening-v direction?

The only thing I can think of at the moment is to modify one leg some tweezers with a notch, allowing me to hold the spring without twisting it, then pull the other end in the right position with my curved number 7's. Alternatively I could use modified tweezers to shove it into some pith wood, magically undoing the bend... right? o:)
 
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Skutt50

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Mar 14, 2008
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I read somewhere about the pit wood method when forming an over coil but I have never tried it.

I am not to sure if it will work the other way around or if it will just bend the spring lengthwise.

I have been lucky not to have that problem but I look forward to answers from others. You never know when you need it.

I hope you solve it somehow. Hairsprings can be quite annoying......
 

Samantha

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Jun 28, 2009
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I use a small block of rubber to make my vertical bends, and it works great. It is of uniform firmness, and provides good control. I don't use any modified tweezers when forming overcoils, just my #6 tweezers, and it sounds like straightening out this hairspring would be very similar.
Samantha
 

Don Dahlberg

NAWCC Member
Aug 31, 2000
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I highly recommend that you get a copy of Henry Fried's Bench Practices for Watch and Clockmakers. It is the second book that every new watchmaker should get. It has a very large section on hairspring work.

It is very difficult for us to explain how to do hairspring work without the aid of good drawings. Fried has already done it.

Don
 

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